Tool Talk

Wrench Forum => Wrench Forum => Topic started by: bonneyman on May 06, 2011, 08:00:35 PM

Title: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on May 06, 2011, 08:00:35 PM
It seems that many of you are interested in the inner workings of ratchets, and how they differ.
I will post pics of the insides of various brands of ratchets that have come across my desk, along with the names that I give the different designs. This should help to "standardize" the different gear mechanisms, so we are all on the same page as far as terminology is concerned. This should help individuals troubleshoot problems, facilitate repairs, and/or obtain the correct repair kit for our problem ratchets.

Here's a list of the most common category's compiled thus far. Grouped together at the beginning so it's easier to add to later, and the pictures follow.
Pear head rats
            - "Batman" pawl (1,2, or 3 tooth on each "wing")
                   - "D" pawl
                   - "Nighthawk" pawl
            - "Tic-Toc" pawls (almost always in pairs)  https://patents.google.com/patent/US2803980
                   - Rectangular pawls
                   - "Two step" pawls
            -  Free floating pawl (single or double)
                   - "Canoe" pawl - totally free "floating" pawl sitting on spring
Round head rats
            - "See-Saw" pawl (single or double pawls that rock back and forth)
            - "Sliding" pawl (pawl "slides" on a shelf forged into the gear assembly)
            -  Semi-Free floating pawl (pawl sits on spring tip and is pivoted with two pegs by a plate)
            -  Stair stepper pawls (i.e. Crescent roundhead) https://patents.google.com/patent/US2715955
Frankenstein rats
            - Sliding rod selector/pawl (1,2, or 3 tooth)
Open head rats
            - "Waterwheel" gears
            -  Single tic-toc type of pawl. (Used alot on refrigeration wrenches)
            -  Single Nighthawk pawl
Universal head rats
            - Floating ball head (New Britain)
             https://patents.google.com/patent/US2709386
             https://patents.google.com/patent/US2800821
Ratcheting wrenches (one direction ratcheting, non-reversible)
            - Box end
                - Winch style pawl (old Dunlap)
                - Rocker type pawl
            - Open end
                - Cam-Loc (floating pins)  https://patents.google.com/patent/US2550010A/en?oq=Cam+Loc+2550010
                - Moveable lower jaw (common of newer ratcheting open end wrenches) - Chicago and Alden brand (China)
Mini-ratchets
            - Reversible - Flip toggle (Yankee, General tools, others)
            - Non-reversible - Single tic-toc pawl (Chapman)


Pear head rats:
An Indestro 6272 used what I call a "batman" pawl. The 3/8"er had 24 teeth gear
The pawl reminds me of the trademark "Batman" symbol from the old 60's TV show.
The corresponding 1/4" version (6072) has 24 teeth also

The old  Plomb WF-series rats used a pair of "tic-toc" pawls - so named because the action of the pawls is like an old grandfather clock. The 1/4" version ahd 24 teeth, and the corresponding 3/8" version (WF-21) has 24 teeth as well.

Round head rats:
The very popular S-K 45170 in 3/8" uses an integrated floating pawl.
https://patents.google.com/patent/US2232477
But it's much easier to remember it as a "see-saw" pawl.
This is one of the most commonly copied actions. You find it on many ratchets, including Craftsman Tri-Wings, Stanley, old Thorsens, and others.

The Bonney -702 round head rats used a pair of floating "see-saw" pawls integrated into the gear head. This design is no stronger than a single see-saw pawl (as only one pawl engages head teeth at a time), but it is longer lasting (as there are two pawls to divide the work) and it effectively "doubles" the amount of teeth, as the gear only has to rotate half as much to get a click. So, although both rats have only 36 teeth, the action is one of a 72 tooth. Nice!
Another brand that uses the design is the ever popular Craftsman RHFT.

The S-K TUFF 1 rats used the FACOM design which I call a "sliding" pawl. Other brands that use this design are the FACOM round heads and the Stanley-made Master-Pro rats, as well as the Craftsman Quik Clean and Tri-Prop rats.

There's much more to come, so, stay tuned. Better yet, if you have any ratchet that is not shown, post up some pics. Tell us what you call them, so we can all learn something. Let's make this a great thread!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on May 06, 2011, 08:12:27 PM
Here's some more rats!
An Indestro Super 2775 in 3/8". It used a variation of the single see-saw pawl which I call the "pilot wings" pawl, with two bearing balls to reduce friction. https://patents.google.com/patent/US2686582

An easy-to-spot "Frankenstein" ratchet, so named because the switching rod sticks out of the neck of the head. S-K and Wright also made "Steiny" rats.  https://patents.google.com/patent/US2701977

Here is a Bonney refrigeration wrench, RF-22. It uses what I call a "water wheel" gear, because it reminds me of those old riverside mills with the big wooden waterwheels.
Many other older ratchets (Thorsen, Action, Wright, etc) used a similar design, known as the "open" style of gear head.

Duro 672 rats used a variation of the batman pawl. Since the triangular pawl looks like a F-117 stealth fighter, I call  it a "nighthawk" pawl.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on May 06, 2011, 08:24:49 PM
Craftsman teardrop-shaped ratchets:
All of the C-man teardrop (i.e pearhead) ratchets use a variation of the batman pawl. The only differences are how they are assembled. It appears that, as time went on, the amount of machining was reduced, and the manufacturers found simpler (i.e. cheaper) ways of assembly. I've listed them with the newest style first, and getting older as you go down the post.

Here's the standard teardrop ratchet available in Sears stores now (since 1993), with what I call the figure-8 plate. So named because the front cover plate looks like an "8".
It is a variation of the batman pawl, with 3 teeth on "wing".

The design it replaced is commonly known as the LLTD (long lever tear drop) ratchet, made from 1957 thru 1992.
I call this a "baby rattle" selector lever, whereas the figure-8 plate selector is a "manta ray". Notice that the pawl on this rat is the older style, with a "D" post. The newest examples have a hyphen-shaped "tang" on them. And this pawl has 2 teeth per wing.

When you place the two side-by-side, it's easy to tell them apart.
The LLTD is on the left, the figure-8 is on the right.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on May 06, 2011, 08:29:55 PM
Some sliding pawl rats.

The first two pics feature a FACOM J.161 in 3/8", with the sliding pawl plainly visible:
The second pic is a Master Pro made by Stanley in 3/8"
The last pic is a Craftsman Tri-Prop (so-called because the selector disc looks like a plane propeller)
It utilizes a fish-hook style of spring with a bend for the pawl, rather than a heart-shaped spring.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: benjy on May 07, 2011, 04:09:09 AM
i have a facom 3/8  flexihead where the wire thingy is completly destroyed.. have you ever made new ones or must it be a service kit?
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Nolatoolguy on May 07, 2011, 10:19:16 AM
Thanks for rebuilding this thread, I loved it.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on May 07, 2011, 10:38:57 AM
i have a facom 3/8  flexihead where the wire thingy is completly destroyed.. have you ever made new ones or must it be a service kit?

There is a US-based company that has exclusive rights to FACOM tools and parts stateside. I checked it out some time ago, and, as I recall, they did have repair kits. They cost $15. But at least they are available. Or you could try a S-K TUFF 1 spring.
Making that little heart-shaped spring yourself? Hmmm - I bet it could be done.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on May 07, 2011, 11:04:07 AM
Double "see-saw" pawl

The ever popular Craftsman RHFT (round head fine tooth) uses the dual integrated floating pawl. Made from 1970 or so thru 2010, it's said to be the best ratchet to bear the Craftsman name.
Here's a 1/4" along with a 3/8"
The close-ups of the 43178 1/4"

The RHFT's were made for Sears by EASCO. Here's an EASCO 3/8" above a Craftsman RHFT 3/8". Notice the heads are the same:

Here's the RHFT above a LLTD. About the only shortcoming with the RHFT is it's not a one-handed rat. You need both hands to switch direction, whereas with the LLTD you can switch directions with one hand - without removing the rat from the bolt.

UPDATE: I've seen an Armstrong and a K-D rats with the same gears in them. I'd be willing to bet the rebuild kits will all interchange.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on May 07, 2011, 01:17:24 PM
Some vintage Snap On ratchets, both are batman pawls
A FV71 in 3/8", 20 tooth and a FN70 in 3/8", 20 teeth
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on May 07, 2011, 01:21:43 PM
Free-floating pawl rats

Here's a very fine tooth Stanley 1/4", #89-817. 45 tooth gear, 7 tooth pawl that is totally free-floating. It is held in relative position, moved for switching, and allowed to ratchet all by the spring. As you can guess, this mechanism doesn't like grease - light oil only!

I believe the new Snap-On Dual 80 uses a pair of pawls, but they operate very much like this single pawl unit.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on May 07, 2011, 01:24:11 PM
The old stand-by Proto 5249 rats in 3/8" used the standard tic-toc pawls, 24 teeth.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on May 07, 2011, 01:40:43 PM
Some single "see-saw" pawl rats

Here's a Stanley-made Tri-Wing Craftsman 1/4" #9-43795 above a newer Stanley-made Husky QR 1/4" #20202. Though bearing different brand names - and separated by more than 20 years - the gear sets interchange, because both are made for Stanley in Taiwan.

Here's the guts of the Thorsen 1/4" to the left of the Tri-Wing 1/4". The single see-saw pawls are evident.

Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: fflintstone on May 07, 2011, 06:48:10 PM
WOW you are indeed the ratchet man.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: hofferwood on May 08, 2011, 12:38:22 AM
This is a 1/2" sparta cs-45, New Britain, Napa low cost :)
 Here's how it goes together. I had to clean and lube, so why not share

All the parts (note one leg a smidge longer on the hair spring)
(http://i870.photobucket.com/albums/ab269/hofferwood/sparta%20ratchet/SD531061.jpg)
This is a 45 tooth action
(http://i870.photobucket.com/albums/ab269/hofferwood/sparta%20ratchet/SD531063.jpg)
Pawl spring in the body
(http://i870.photobucket.com/albums/ab269/hofferwood/sparta%20ratchet/SD531065.jpg)
Pawl in relative place
(http://i870.photobucket.com/albums/ab269/hofferwood/sparta%20ratchet/SD531066.jpg)
Hairspring in pawl movement plate
(http://i870.photobucket.com/albums/ab269/hofferwood/sparta%20ratchet/SD531067.jpg)
(http://i870.photobucket.com/albums/ab269/hofferwood/sparta%20ratchet/SD531068.jpg)
Selector plate mounted on pawl mov. plate (note spring legs thru holes, long leg to the inside)
(http://i870.photobucket.com/albums/ab269/hofferwood/sparta%20ratchet/SD531069.jpg)
E-clip ready to pop on (no lube for photo clarity)
(http://i870.photobucket.com/albums/ab269/hofferwood/sparta%20ratchet/SD531070.jpg)
Lubed and ready to go
(http://i870.photobucket.com/albums/ab269/hofferwood/sparta%20ratchet/SD531072.jpg)
The lube I use
(http://i870.photobucket.com/albums/ab269/hofferwood/sparta%20ratchet/SD531073.jpg)
Head size comparison, Sk 42470,Sparta, Cman 44985, Cman 44809
(http://i870.photobucket.com/albums/ab269/hofferwood/sparta%20ratchet/SD531074.jpg)
(http://i870.photobucket.com/albums/ab269/hofferwood/sparta%20ratchet/SD531075.jpg)
Chuck
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: fflintstone on May 08, 2011, 09:57:17 AM
The lube I use
(http://i870.photobucket.com/albums/ab269/hofferwood/sparta%20ratchet/SD531073.jpg)
Chuck

That photo looks familiar!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: mrchuck on May 08, 2011, 04:38:53 PM
Thanks for re-surrecting your old post on ratchet innards.
I have depended upon them many times as I venture into the "mine field" without experience.
I'm still alive with all limbs thanks to you,,,mrchuck.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: lzenglish on May 08, 2011, 05:01:46 PM
Thanks for re-surrecting your old post on ratchet innards.


Yes, I agree. The long running ratchet post is an Excellent Educational Tool, and has saved me more than once! Thanks George, and Please keep up the Good Work!

Wayne
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: snapmom on May 10, 2011, 04:17:13 AM
A one inch drive No. 73 Snap on, from the 30s
(http://i390.photobucket.com/albums/oo343/snapmom/HPIM2295.jpg)
(http://i390.photobucket.com/albums/oo343/snapmom/HPIM2294.jpg)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: snapmom on May 10, 2011, 04:45:54 AM
Snap on FR84
(http://i390.photobucket.com/albums/oo343/snapmom/HPIM1811.jpg)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on May 18, 2011, 08:27:22 AM
Thanks for the kind words, folks!

Be assured that I'm learning as much as you all. The thread is a community project. The more contributors we get, the better it will be.


Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on May 18, 2011, 04:38:15 PM
"Semi-free" floating pawl design by New Britain. Used by Sparta, NAPA, Husky, Blackhawk, and others
UPDATE: I've seen a Craftsman Digi-torque rebuild kit on ebay, with enough detail to be able to tell it's this type of pawl system. FYI

With the semi-free floater, the coil spring under the pawl allows the up and down movement, while helping to keep the pawl in relative position. The close-pin spring switches the pawls direction, as well as providing the ratcheting action. With the total free floater, the coil spring performs all of these functions.
The shape of the selector ridge (a hyphen with a bulge in the center) is a dead give-away.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on May 19, 2011, 08:22:06 AM
Ratcheting screwdrivers

They seem to be an ever-popular tool in most tool boxes, so I'll post the ones I've had. They do have some interesting actions in there!

70's SCREWBALL (yellow egg-shaped ball - mine is painted red) used stamped steel pawls - I count 38 teeth on the stamped steel gear.
A great tool history on it here: https://harveycountyvoices.blogspot.com/2013/05/a-tool-with-all-features-missing-in.html

70's EASYDRIVER (half red/half black ball) used three plastic step pawls, with 7 teeth on each. The inside of the ball has 180 teeth. With so many teeth, even though it's plastic, there's plenty of engagement- and it doesn't slip even under heavy load.
http://www.datamp.org/patents/displayPatent.php?number=3742787&typeCode=0
https://patents.google.com/patent/US3742787

I have a palm ratchet made in Mexico that uses two tic-toc pawls and a 24 teeth stamped gear.

YANKEE screwdrivers utilized a pair of stamped steel "L" pawls.

Snap-On ratcheting screwdrivers used a pair of what I call them "bleacher" pawls, because they look like the bleachers at the local high school.
If someone has pics of the assembly, please post them. Thanks!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: rusty on May 21, 2011, 09:13:25 AM

This is what's in the rivited together Blackhawk 9811 ratchet.
Essentially a winch type mechanism.

Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on May 21, 2011, 09:27:06 AM

This is what's in the rivited together Blackhawk 9811 ratchet.
Essentially a winch type mechanism.

Cool!
Looks like an easy mechanism to fix. A replacement pawl could easily be cut and ground out of shop stock.
Is the gear reversible by removal and flipping it over? As is, all the wear will concentrate on one side of the teeth. If it's reversible - when it gets worn -  you can flip the gear, and have fresh teeth surface.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on May 22, 2011, 10:30:24 AM
Some more rat pictures.

Here's a New Britain NM40 in 3/8"
Two-step tic-toc pawls, shared-spring design, 20 tooth gear:

And a None Better (N.B. = New Britain) design S40. Same type of pawls, slightly different shared spring and selector pivot design, 26 teeth:  http://www.datamp.org/patents/displayPatent.php?id=52590
You may have noticed that some of the older "BE" Craftsman ratchets are the same. This is because New Britain had a Craftsman contract for many years.

A Diamalloy reefer wrench, using a triangular pawl, instead of the more typical tic-toc, waterwheel gear, or winch-type rocker pawl setups. 24 teeth
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on May 24, 2011, 12:36:26 PM
What kind of Craftsman rat do I have?
Some folks may be unfamiliar with the minor differences between the two very similar Craftsman round head rats. Here they are in 1/4" versions, side by side.

The top rat is what's commonly known as a "Tri-Wing" - the selector has 3 panels on it.
The lower rat is a "Tri-Prop" - the selector has a center screw and three projections like a propeller.

The Tri-Wing is an 80's era round head using a single see-saw pawl. Made in Taiwan by Stanley for Sears. My example is not QR, though later rebuild kits were QR.
The Tri-Prop is a sliding pawl design, intro'd in 2009 or so, cannot be QR, and is USA made as far as I know.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on May 26, 2011, 06:45:10 PM
Ratcheting open end wrench: Bonney Cam-Loc

Here are a pair of double Cam-Loc wrench, used in the automotive industry.

https://patents.google.com/patent/US2550010

It used a series of spring-loaded pins and steel ramps to simulate a ratcheting action. Non-reversible, you flipped the wrench over to ratchet in the opposite direction.
While tightening, the hex points of the fastener moved the pins against the ramps, which let the pins slide only so far forward before jamming them. In ratcheting direction, the hex points pushed the pins backwards against the spring, which allowed enough movement for the pins to skip over the hex point. My example has 5 pins (for 6-point fasteners), but others I've seen have 10 pins (12-point action). Most Cam-Loc wrenches were a single size, but mine is a shorty double, probably for tight work on automotive hydraulics or refrigeration fittings.
Found the next size DFE today (8-12-13) and added a pic.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on May 29, 2011, 11:29:29 AM
Here's some more ratchets out of my picture archives.

A pair of Indestro pear-head 3/8". One with a genuine Batman pawl, the other with a Nighthawk pawl. As far as I could tell, either set of guts would fit in either head.
The bottom pic is a Duro 672 in 1/2" drive. The Nighthawk pawl is clearly visible.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: rusty on June 01, 2011, 05:08:31 PM

The 1/4 drive Sparta is like it's big brothers,  but a with spring clip instead of a C-clip.
Getting the tiny spring clip out is an interesting challenge...
I didn't take the guts apart, they worked fine, and I can barely see the parts...
So all it got was cleaned and lubed...

Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on June 01, 2011, 07:40:25 PM
Nice Sparta rat!
For some reason, I started thinking NAPA while looking at this ratchet. Did Sparta make tools for NAPA auto parts stores?

And, I'm learning about the "too small to see" thing. Seems to have hit with a vengeance since turning 50. :(
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bc_z on June 18, 2011, 12:45:03 PM
As a new guy on the site, THANKS for creating a wonderful reference piece.  Is there a way on this site to "Sticky" or "Leave at the front of the forum page" such an informative post?

bc_z
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on June 19, 2011, 01:22:10 PM
Glad we could help you out, bz. And - if you have any ratchets not yet pictured - take 'em apart and post some photos. I'd love to see what you've got. B-man
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: rusty on June 19, 2011, 02:20:47 PM

The Walden Worcester Ratchet is a little Plumb/Proto like, and a little New Brittan like.

The first thing that is odd is, it has screws in both sides.

You want to take the 2 furthest from the handle out first.

The poor ratchet below also shows the weakness of this design, all the force on the pawl is focused at  the screw, when forced, the thin end of the pawl breaks and the pawl jumps out of place and i t's all over...
Title: For you RHFT fans: A Proto!
Post by: bonneyman on June 25, 2011, 06:13:39 PM
There's a guy over at the gazette who posted pics of a new Proto with the double see-saw pawls like the Craftsman RHFT and the Triangle-era Bonney's. He says I can use his pictures - as soon as I figure out how to import someone else's pics off of photobucket, I'll post them here.
I believe it is a 5452A in 3/8"
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Papaw on June 25, 2011, 08:13:10 PM
Right click the picture on the Gazette, read the properties, copy the url, and paste here, using the picture icon above the post text box.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on June 26, 2011, 02:39:15 PM
Let's try that:
(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/IMG_3339.jpg)
And the gear assembly:
(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/IMG_3344.jpg)

This gear assembly is remarkably similar to the Bonney gear, though it has QR (whereas the Bonney does not). But the similarity of design and manufacture is uncanny.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: 48548 on June 28, 2011, 11:06:44 AM
Here is a snapon 3/4 ratchet adapter broken down....  4 pawls on this model  Here are the pawls 1/2, 3/4 and 1" model versions.

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/tools/IMG_3692.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/tools/IMG_3693.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/tools/IMG_3694.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/tools/IMG_3695.jpg)



(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/tools/IMG_3485.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/tools/IMG_3486.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/tools/IMG_3487.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/tools/IMG_3488.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/tools/IMG_3489.jpg)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: 48548 on June 28, 2011, 11:10:26 AM
Here is a plomb 1/2 ratchet adapter with broken teeth...

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/tools/IMG_3429.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/tools/IMG_3430.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/tools/IMG_3431.jpg)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: 48548 on June 28, 2011, 11:13:46 AM
A toptul version...  3/8 head version on botton and 1/4 bit on top.

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/tools/IMG_3335.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/tools/IMG_3336.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/tools/IMG_3337.jpg)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: 48548 on June 28, 2011, 11:17:40 AM
A genius version.

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/tools/IMG_3211.jpg)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: 48548 on June 28, 2011, 11:19:49 AM
Here is a snapon FHNF100.

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/IMG_4256.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/IMG_4257.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/IMG_4258.jpg)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: 48548 on June 28, 2011, 11:21:39 AM
Here is a Snapon TK860

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/IMG_3368.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/IMG_3369.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/IMG_3370.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/IMG_3371.jpg)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: 48548 on June 28, 2011, 11:35:41 AM
A Snapon F747A

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/IMG_3351.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/IMG_3343.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/IMG_3350.jpg)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: 48548 on June 28, 2011, 12:37:26 PM
Here are some new NB.

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/Koken/IMG_4013.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/Koken/IMG_4014.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/Koken/IMG_4015.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/Koken/IMG_4016.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/Koken/IMG_4017.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/Koken/IMG_4018.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/Koken/IMG_4019.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/Koken/IMG_4020.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/Koken/IMG_4021.jpg)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: 48548 on June 28, 2011, 12:40:27 PM
Some more koken all based off the proto/plomb design, but upgraded a little.

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/Koken/IMG_3914.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/Koken/IMG_3915.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/Koken/IMG_3916.jpg)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: 48548 on June 28, 2011, 12:50:43 PM
(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/Koken/IMG_3901.jpg)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: 48548 on June 28, 2011, 02:34:54 PM
A koken Ratchet adapter.

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/toolbox%204-2011/IMG_5453.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/toolbox%204-2011/IMG_5452.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/toolbox%204-2011/IMG_5451.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/toolbox%204-2011/IMG_5450.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/toolbox%204-2011/IMG_5449.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/toolbox%204-2011/IMG_5448.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/toolbox%204-2011/IMG_5447.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/toolbox%204-2011/IMG_5446.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/toolbox%204-2011/IMG_5445.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/toolbox%204-2011/IMG_5444.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/toolbox%204-2011/IMG_5443.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/toolbox%204-2011/IMG_5442.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/toolbox%204-2011/IMG_5441.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/toolbox%204-2011/IMG_5440.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/toolbox%204-2011/IMG_5439.jpg)

(http://i421.photobucket.com/albums/pp296/48548/toolbox%204-2011/IMG_5438.jpg)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on June 28, 2011, 03:54:44 PM
Welcome aboard, 48548! And thx for all those pics.
Lots of familaia actions in there. See-saw pawls, FACOM-style sliding pawl, and others. Yeah!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: 48548 on June 28, 2011, 04:02:11 PM
Not a problem, since I left GJ, I have just stayed on GG, but nice to see a different forum.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on June 29, 2011, 09:47:55 PM
Not a problem, since I left GJ, I have just stayed on GG, but nice to see a different forum.

I figured you'd like it here!
Drop by the introductions page, and say hi. Let everybody know who you are. They're real friendly in these parts!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on July 04, 2011, 01:22:59 PM
Just a little thanks for getting the thread up to 700 views!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on July 17, 2011, 10:59:03 AM
An old P&C ratchet, in 1/4" #6246
Standard Tic-Toc pawls, 24 tooth gear

I can't get the idea out of my head that the plate looks like mickey mouse, due to the little projections on the side for the attachment screws. :)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on July 22, 2011, 02:14:44 PM
Some "new" ratchets!
First off, an S-K "Roto-Head" in 3/8". Haven't used it yet, but I hear it's really nice. Same single see-saw pawl as the regular S-K round heads.

A Craftsman "Quick Clean" ratchet in 1/4". #43771
45 teeth, 11 pawl teeth, sliding pawl
Here's the 1/4" gear next to a 3/8" QC gear for ease of viewing the sliding pawls:
These ratchets have a neat feature for removing the gear clusters for cleaning and lubing. You push the QR button in until it locks in. Then twist the gear out. To reinstall, push the QR button in until it locks, then re-insert the gear cluster into the ratchet head. While holding it in place, push in the pin on the knuckle side to release the QR button. The gear then locks back into place. My particular 3/8" gear uses a thin disc to unlock and lock the gear cluster in.
Gotta say I really like this ratchet overall. If it were USA made and had a knurled handle, it could easily become my favorite style!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on August 13, 2011, 01:21:33 PM
Happy 1000th viewing!
Thanks for all the support!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Papaw on August 13, 2011, 02:31:48 PM
Here is a Proto Challenger #1060 ,1/4 drive, see-saw pawl, 45 tooth model.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on August 13, 2011, 05:59:27 PM
Gosh if the gear head in that rat doesn't look like the old Thorsen parts! Nice ratchet!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Papaw on August 13, 2011, 06:20:50 PM
I found that ratchet in a local pawn Friday. Place I go to regularly, and he had it marked $6.95. I had my grandkids with me showing them some stuff when I saw it. I wanted to show the grandson about haggling, but the guy took my $5 offer right out of the box!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: jimwrench on August 22, 2011, 08:00:20 PM
 Got this Armstrong No. FAB-51 today. wonder what the (B) stands for as alloy shows a FA-51 but not a FAB-51
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on August 23, 2011, 10:02:30 PM
From the look of the lever, probably a pair of tic-toc pawls in there. Could also be a batman pawl, too.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: wvginseng on August 26, 2011, 02:10:17 PM
Nice Sparta rat!
For some reason, I started thinking NAPA while looking at this ratchet. Did Sparta make tools for NAPA auto parts stores?

And, I'm learning about the "too small to see" thing. Seems to have hit with a vengeance since turning 50. :(
New Britain made tools under different brands, sparta, mustang, none better, husky, blackhawk ( once acquired in 1955) as well as napa and New Britain.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: wvginseng on August 26, 2011, 03:05:26 PM
I collect mostly older ratchets, here is a odd one a mopar u.s.a. I believe may have been made by bonney? the bottom 
photo shows the gear and the single pawl, does not really match too many designs. sorry for the poor photos.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on August 26, 2011, 07:36:14 PM
Cool ratchet!
Try angling your camera a little off of 90 degrees when snapping it. Then the chrome won't send the flash back in the lens.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: lauver on August 28, 2011, 11:37:24 AM
Bonneyman,

I have a Thorsen 77J 3/8" drive open head ratchet for you; the overall length is 7-1/2" while the head width is 1-1/8".  This design was not intended to be disassembled during normal use or a normal lifetime.  It was instead designed to be easy to clean and lube and perform reliably under the worst of conditions.  Here's some photos:

Overview with the gear cover removed and shown below the ratchet
(http://i366.photobucket.com/albums/oo109/lauver_photos/Thorsen77J1.jpg)

Close-up side view of head.  Note there is a cavity in the handle shank with spring and ball that keeps tension on the V-shaped lever/pawl assembly.  The lever and pawls are all one piece.  The pawls each have two teeth that engage the drive gear.  The drive gear has 30 teeth.
(http://i366.photobucket.com/albums/oo109/lauver_photos/Thorsen77J4.jpg)

Top view of head.  Note the pivit pin for the lever/pawl assembly.  This pin is pressed in.
(http://i366.photobucket.com/albums/oo109/lauver_photos/Thorsen77J3.jpg)

I'm guessing the drive bit could be pressed out from one side or the other, which would allow the gear to be removed/replaced, but I have never had reason to try this.

Hope this adds to the body of ratchet knowledge....
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on August 28, 2011, 02:19:18 PM
Thanks, Gary, for those great open-head pics!
Really kicking myself for letting those two open rats get away. Live and learn I guess.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: lauver on August 28, 2011, 05:38:53 PM
bonneyman,

You're welcome.  If you have this same thread on other tool sites, feel free to repost my photos and text.  It's all good.

BTW-- I used this thread the other day when I was reassembling a Proto boxhead ratchet.  I wanted to make sure I got the selector cam oriented correctly before I got everything buttoned up.  Nothing like having a good photo to look at.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on August 28, 2011, 07:45:22 PM
bonneyman,

You're welcome.  If you have this same thread on other tool sites, feel free to repost my photos and text.  It's all good.

BTW-- I used this thread the other day when I was reassembling a Proto boxhead ratchet.  I wanted to make sure I got the selector cam oriented correctly before I got everything buttoned up.  Nothing like having a good photo to look at.

I'm glad you found the thread helpful. That's one of the reasons I started it - to help others out.
I did try it over at GJ, but have since left that forum. Was thinking maybe GG, but then I see alot of guys from over there posting here. Don't want to do too much reduplicating.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Tool Pants on September 11, 2011, 11:48:52 AM
The one marked Mopar is a Bonney.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: kxxr on September 13, 2011, 04:43:50 PM
Here are some Husky guts with lots of really old crud on them. I'll take it apart and clean it up for another photo later.
(http://i301.photobucket.com/albums/nn48/kxxr/HuskyGuts.jpg)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on September 14, 2011, 12:35:01 PM
Nice old rat, kxxr!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: kxxr on September 14, 2011, 06:20:16 PM
More guts, less crud. This came to me courtesy of Bob W.(amertrac) up in the Mountains of N.Y., UFO country!
(http://i301.photobucket.com/albums/nn48/kxxr/tools/moregutslesscrud.jpg)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on September 14, 2011, 07:28:02 PM
That looks very much like a New Britain S40 rat I have pictured on page 2. Could they share a common manufacturer?
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: kxxr on September 14, 2011, 08:42:03 PM
I'm pretty certain the Husky is New Britain made also. I'll look closer for any model number stampings as I do more cleaning.
The Husky name has endured but the company only stood on its own for a very few years, having been founded in 1924 by Sigmund Mandl (of Blackhawk fame). The Husky name was sold in 1929 to Olsen Mfg, and Sigmund went to work for Blackhawk. New Britain had acquired Husky by 1932. That's a pretty short run for a name that is still with us today and not going anywhere soon.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on September 15, 2011, 08:25:18 AM
Cool! Guess I learned something new from the ratchet forum today!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: kxxr on September 18, 2011, 09:51:52 AM
Can someone tell me how to disassemble this little devil? I think Stanley still makes a version of this ratchet but I'm not sure. I didn't see it pictured in this thread yet. If I can get it apart, I'll take some photos. I borrowed these photos from Lump, I wonder if he still has some of these? It is a taiwan MicroTough. The shift switch is machined out to hold some sort of mechanism, if that's a clue to anyone. I can see it moving in there and can manipulate it with a probe, but damned if I can see how it comes apart.
(http://i301.photobucket.com/albums/nn48/kxxr/tools/Ratchetquarterin3.jpg)
(http://i301.photobucket.com/albums/nn48/kxxr/tools/ratqmt3.jpg)
(http://i301.photobucket.com/albums/nn48/kxxr/tools/Ratchetquarterin2.jpg)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: rusty on September 18, 2011, 12:22:01 PM

Never seen one of those either, but, sometimes the trick is pushing the release button in all the way with the reverse lever held in the middle.....
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on September 18, 2011, 08:41:48 PM

Never seen one of those either, but, sometimes the trick is pushing the release button in all the way with the reverse lever held in the middle.....

+1 on that. I've not seen this style of ratchet before either, but I'm figuring it's a dual movement removal trick.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on September 21, 2011, 08:21:29 AM
Thanks for the 1500 hits, folks! Guess this thread is really helping people.
I'll be trying to post some more ratchet pics of recent acquisitions to make it more interesting.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on September 25, 2011, 08:48:37 AM
I've had to delete my photobucket account due to my disagreement with their new terms of use policy. That will probably drop off all of my ratchet pictures. I'm looking into other options at this time, but I wanted you all to know in advance so you're not caught unawares.
They say my account will be deleted within 48 hours. If you print the thread before then, you will at least have a hard copy of my pics. Sorry for the inconvenience.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Papaw on September 26, 2011, 01:44:27 AM
I downloaded every photo in your Photobucket Album, but I could only get the 640x480 size. I saved them in a zip file, and also extracted them and saved them on a thumb drive.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on September 26, 2011, 06:30:42 PM
Wow! Impressive! I'm really a low tech guy at heart.
I have all the photos on my hard drive. If I can figure a way to get them from my computer back to the forum, I'll reload them that way. Just a bit busy on this end right now.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: lauver on October 12, 2011, 10:36:41 AM
hofferwood,

Thanks for post #13 re: Sparta CS-45 1/2" drive round head.  Your photos of the ratchet core saved my bacon and my sanity today. 

I picked up a nice vintage Husky CS-45 this weekend that was not working smoothly at all.  I took the core out to clean and lube it.  Reassembled it and it was still not working 100%.  So I did a complete disassembly and flattenened both top plates and deburred several pieces.  When I went to reassemble it I had trouble remembering how it came apart.  Then I remembered this thread.  Bingo! Your photos helped me get it back together.  Now all is well with my newly acquired Husky.

For the record, my ratchet has patent 2,291,389 stamped on it.  This is the patent for this Kilness ratchet mechanism.  This patent was applied for in 1957 and issued in 1961.  This patent was assigned to the New Britain Machine Company, where Kilness worked.  There are some really nice illustrations of this ratchet mechanism attached to the patent.

Thanks again...
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: johnsironsanctuary on October 22, 2011, 08:45:39 AM
Now for the T-Rex of ratchets. A Williams 'SUPERECTOR'  E1-24 standard duty. If you look at my 'Williams, Herbrand, Armstrong catalogs' post in Catalog forum, you can see the 1939 catalog page for this piece.  My 24 inch is the baby of the family. It only weighs a little under 11 pounds. The made them as an E1-24" standard duty, an E1-36" standard duty, an E2-36 heavy duty, an E2-48 heavy duty and an E3-48 extra heavy duty. This is a 4 pawl design as you can see.  The unusual part is that the sockets are forgings with the ratchet teeth milled into the socket. You simply backed out the two set screws in the hole and the set the shifter lever in neutral and the socket/ratchet slides out to change the wrench size. The set screws are a little chewed from being used, but the rest of this wrench shows absolutely no signs of wear. The little rat in the photo is a Craftsman 1/4". If anyone has any sockets, I would be interested in buying them.

Here is one on Ebay. http://www.ebay.com/itm/USED-J-H-WILLIAMS-THE-SUPERECTOR-e3-48-RATCHET-3-7-8-SOCKET-/110760924070?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item19c9dd93a6 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/USED-J-H-WILLIAMS-THE-SUPERECTOR-e3-48-RATCHET-3-7-8-SOCKET-/110760924070?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item19c9dd93a6)

He says it weighs 59 pounds. Obviously, not a wrench for wimps.

Bonneyman, thanks for the post. I NEVER would have learned all of this if it weren't for this post.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: kxxr on October 22, 2011, 10:06:23 AM
I get it. Do you think those are the original type screws?
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: johnsironsanctuary on October 22, 2011, 02:40:26 PM
Yes, I think that the screws are original. They show a little wear from being tightened, but not much and the wrench itself is in such remarkable shape.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Uncle Buck on October 26, 2011, 09:56:16 AM
This thread is a smashing resource guys! Very well done for the folks needing to crack some of these old timers open!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: KeepinOldBolts on November 13, 2011, 04:03:32 PM
Here is a S-K slide type reversing 3/8 drive ratchet. No part number. It's a pretty coarse sounding 32 tooth mechanism as the cylindrical slide performs the ratchet action.

Arrows reflect the detents for the spring loaded ball.

Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on November 13, 2011, 06:54:49 PM
I am so gratified that our little stickey here has surpassed 2000 views. And I'm glad you all are getting so much out of it!
With Papaws help, I've figured out how to post pics from my PC to the forum, so will be adding some new photos as I get the ratchets.

And that is a great exploded view of the S-K frankenstein ratchet! Angled spring and all!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on November 14, 2011, 02:21:22 PM
Old Craftsman Moore Drop Forge ratchet.
Prior to the LLTD, MDF rats were the standard ratchet offered by Sears. They used a batman pawl setup. A  friend had a pair he inherited form his dad, and he was kind enough to let me take them apart and take pics. Thanks RG!

We have a 1/2" and a 1/4" MDF, with interior views. Then there are two pics of the MDF compared to an LLTD for comparison.
Title: Williams 1/4"er
Post by: bonneyman on November 19, 2011, 01:32:29 PM
Picked up a "new" ratchet yesterday. A Williams M-52A. Couldn't wait to post pics.
Uses dual see-saw pawls, but they're offset from one another. Bottom pic has it next to a Bonney 1/4" with dual see-saw pawls, and the offset is clearly visible. 40 teeth in gear head.
Title: EASCO 1/4"er
Post by: bonneyman on November 19, 2011, 04:57:45 PM
Been on the lookout for an ergonomic ratchet since ruining my Matco. While I had it apart for cleaning and lube, I snapped a few pics. Single see-saw pawl, like the S-K and Thorsen roundheads. Very smooth, and comfortable to hold. And very small head diameter. Great for tight places. Wonder how the durability is on these?
Title: American Forge 3901
Post by: bonneyman on November 23, 2011, 04:52:54 PM
Snagged other ratchet today. An American Forge in 3/8" drive.
A semi-free floating pawl, with 44 teeth in the head.
https://patents.google.com/patent/US2981389

I have a no-name that was made by New Britain that uses this design, and we have a Sparta rat exploded view with the same thing. Plus I've seen a Husky with this system. Maybe N.B. had a niche with this mechanism?
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: rusty on November 28, 2011, 04:53:09 PM
>Here is a S-K slide type reversing 3/8 drive ratchet. No part number.

Kewl,I just found a broken one at the flea. Took it apart and the tiny ball was rusted and stuck, a few gentle taps and it's all happy now. Lubed it up and it works fine.

It is a coarse ratchet, not as nice as the later SK's, also has a lot of backlash, the frankenstein ears tend to travel with the gear so they have to move back quite a bit when you reverse direction before the pawl pin reengages the gear.  Probably why this type of ratchet didn't stay around long...
Title: Old Dunlap ratcheting box wrenches
Post by: bonneyman on December 03, 2011, 05:20:46 PM
I found a Dunlap ratcheting box wrench about a year ago. Simple but strong steel construction, with simple guts once you de-rivet the thing. I think I'll call it the 'winch' style of pawl.  https://patents.google.com/patent/US2421038
A related patent: https://patents.google.com/patent/US3742788A/en

I recently managed to grab some others, and updated them as well with S.S. cap screws and nuts. This then allows for disassembly for cleaning, lubing, and repairs. What I really like is that, if something breaks, one can make the pawls and spring at home with basic hand tools. A great feature when you can't just go to the local store and buy new.

The pawls can be flipped if one side gets really worn. So you can get twice the life out of a wrench. But I don't think wear is much of a concern. I tried cleaning up one pawl tip with a file, as it had a pesky nick. The file barely even touched it!
Plus, I discovered that the 3/8x7/16 pawls are the same size as the 1/2x9/16. Nice to know if you have a spare of one wrench and need parts to fix a broken one of the other size.

Update: I've got the largest size, so now I have the complete set of four.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: KeepinOldBolts on December 17, 2011, 03:21:49 PM
Armstrong, in 3/8" drive. I must say, this is the saamoooooothest ratchet I have ever used. It has replaced my Proto pear head as my go-to 3/8" un-buckler. Measuring a full 3/4" thick in the head of the ratchet! That's the same thickness as a 1/2" drive Cman.

It's a 24 tooth ratchet drive with a small knurled selector switch knob. Note the ball detent (between selector positions) which prevents accidental reversing while in hot pursuit of that 19/32" fastener under race conditions.



Title: Unmarked Proto, or Fleet?
Post by: Papaw on December 18, 2011, 02:14:57 PM
Snagged this 3/8 drive ratchet at an estate sale yesterday. Locked up, frozen, and seemingly unmarked. I hope my $1 was well spent!
Needs a vinegar bath and disassembly.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: kxxr on December 18, 2011, 07:04:57 PM
Looks Proto-ish. No markings discernible, maybe some will show up in the cleaning.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: mrchuck on December 20, 2011, 07:24:56 AM
It should clean up just fine. The Phillips head screws are always the hardest to get out, without buggering them. The springs behind each pawl dis-integrate sometimes too.

Let us know when you finish the restoration.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: lauver on December 20, 2011, 11:00:01 PM
Papaw,

Pretty sure it's from the Plomb/Proto family; likely to be Fleet or Penens based on the two coverplate design.  Let us know what you find under the rust and crud.  I have a Fleet and it's one of the better ratchets made by plomb/Proto.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Papaw on December 21, 2011, 06:50:27 AM
24 hours in vinegar, warm water wash, and a light brass wire brushing cleaned it up nicely.
It is a Fleet #1261, Made in USA. The markings are clear, but so fine that they don't show in a close-up. Fleet is in all caps italicized. Also has OFF and ON by the selector, which is still very stiff.  I count 24 clicks when turning the drive.
Now for disassembly.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Papaw on December 21, 2011, 07:10:47 AM
Nasty inside, and one spring missing. Looks like it will rebuild nicely.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Tool Pants on December 21, 2011, 10:42:34 PM
There is something about those Fleet ratchets, and springs.  First Bull then me.

I have taken 100 or so ratchets apart,  Never lost a spring.  Then it happened with a Fleet.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Papaw on December 22, 2011, 07:27:34 AM
Haven't had time to search for springs yet, and the selector is stuck to one side still.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Tool Pants on January 06, 2012, 02:21:29 AM
It does not have to be a cone spring.  Find a normal spring that has little tension and the correct diameter and cut it.  The spring in the pic has been used to fix 2 ratchets with missing or damaged springs, including the Fleet.  All the cone springs I have seen at hardware stores had way too much tension and are too big.

Those dual plate ratchets can be tricky getting back together.  Don't lose a spring.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: KeepinOldBolts on January 21, 2012, 01:47:11 PM
There is something about those Fleet ratchets, and springs.  First Bull then me.

I picked up my first Fleet today, a solid buck brought it home, although the end plates were weirdly bent and upon opening it....missing a spring! Go figure.

A donor spring from the parts bin was procured, and I'm on the way to the hardware store for a replacement missing phillips screw. Fun 'lil rat!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: rusty on January 21, 2012, 03:49:52 PM
> the end plates were weirdly bent ...

The only weakness of this design, other than the pawl pinning, if you get the ratchet stuck to a socket, and try to pry it iff, it bends the face plates....

>on the way to the hardware store

You are supposed to have a coffee can full of ratchet screws - P

They are a nice overall idiot proof design tho, one of my favorite of the older designs : )
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Papaw on January 21, 2012, 05:17:43 PM
Haven't had much time to work on the Fleet, but a part of a ball-point spring fits well, and the ratchet works nicely. Now for a real cleaning.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: lauver on January 26, 2012, 09:21:19 AM
bonneyman,

I have a MasterPro (Stanley) 3/8 ratchet with some issues.  I have removed the core, cleaned, lubed, and reassembled.  The sliding pawl is not fully engaging.  I suspect the heart shaped spring that connects the pawl to the selector disk is bent, kinked, or not properly connected to the pawl.

My questions for you, Mr. Ratchet, is how do you disassemble the core once removed?  How do you remove the selector disk so you can get to the heart shaped spring.  And last, how do you put it back together?

FYI, I can get the selector disk part of the way off by pressing the QR button and pulling up, but something is keeping it from coming all the way out.  Is there a detent ball inside the core that I can't see? Is there some other trick?

Pleazzzzzz!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Papaw on January 29, 2012, 10:09:59 AM
A vinegar bath followed by a soft brass brush cleaned the Fleet ratchet nicely, but reassembly with a piece of ball-point pen spring was lacking. The selector is hard to move to one side. I found that it would not move the pawl dog all the way to one side. Re-peening sort of helped, but it sticks easily. Moving toward the replacement spring is very hard and the ratchet won't ratchet that direction. Back to the drawing board, I guess.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: lauver on January 29, 2012, 09:02:26 PM
Papaw,

Sorry to hear your Fleet is not working out the way you wanted.  If memory serves, the original springs were cone shaped.  Tool Pants did a similar spring replacement and his worked out nicely.  You might pm him and ask him what kind of spring he used.  You know Tool Pants, he's probably got all kinds of photos of his spring experiment which might be helpful to you.

It sounds to me like you might have two problems with your fleet; 1) the replacement spring might be too stiff, and 2) something could be wrong with the cam/selector that pushes the pawl out of engagement.  I remember on my fleet ratchet the selector lever/cam assembly was real sloppy.  I had to drive the selector further down on the pin and restake the selector pin to take this play out of the assembly.  Then everything clicked into place. It not only works good, but it works great... like a Swiss watch.  Just some ideas...

Keep me posted on your progress.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on February 04, 2012, 02:45:42 PM
Sorry I can't be of any help on that Master Pro, lauver. I only got it apart to the core assembly, and a long ATF/acetone soak got it working. My spring wasn't damaged. I wasn't able to figure out how to get it apart, and at that point it worked, so I didn't want to risk breaking it to get it apart further.
Title: A old Crafstman baby rattle ratchet
Post by: bonneyman on February 10, 2012, 11:36:03 AM
Had an OLD Craftsman 1/2" ratchet come across my desk, and I thought it was a Batman type of pawl. To my surprise, the pawl was completely circular, with two rounded grooves machined in it to give the pivot point it needed to skip. Guess the original "D" post pawls were made this way until the Batman pawl I'm more used to replaced it.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on April 20, 2012, 07:32:13 PM
Some EASCO round-heads. Known as the "paintbrush style" (or "spoon handle") because of the gently curved handle. Single see-saw pawls and coiled flat spring retainer (like the old Thorsen round-heads). Very slim head, comfy handle, fits my hand well.
42 teeth on the 3/8", 36 teeth on the 1/4". Both gear heads have one hole drilled into the side that goes all the way to the center hole. Don't know what purpose it serves.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Papaw on June 14, 2012, 01:34:55 PM
A vinegar bath followed by a soft brass brush cleaned the Fleet ratchet nicely, but reassembly with a piece of ball-point pen spring was lacking. The selector is hard to move to one side. I found that it would not move the pawl dog all the way to one side. Re-peening sort of helped, but it sticks easily. Moving toward the replacement spring is very hard and the ratchet won't ratchet that direction. Back to the drawing board, I guess.
This ratchet needs a new home with someone who wants to rebuild it. It is in the Buy, Sell Forum.SOLD!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: kxxr on July 08, 2012, 12:18:24 PM
NAPA NB43 rebuild:
Here is the repair kit for the NAPA NB43. One end of the spring has a loop, which you can see, and the other end is bent at 90 degrees, which is tough to see in my picture. I got the body for free and the kit was $10.69 at NAPA.
(http://i301.photobucket.com/albums/nn48/kxxr/tools/nb431.jpg)
The instructions say to assemble things as you see here (NAPA side up), and then you are to align the little post on the selector cover so that once it is in place and you turn it to the left, it engages the spring. At that point, you insert the center screw most of the way, turn the selector to the right and tighten the screw (T-15), and you're done. The problem is that it is a blind procedure once you get the cover near the target.
(http://i301.photobucket.com/albums/nn48/kxxr/tools/nb43c-1.jpg)
I made several attempts at that method without success. Then I took the spring out of the ratchet head, placed it in the correct position on the cover plate and, as I peeked through the center hole, I lined the 90 degree end into the pawl hole, then turned the plate to the left as the instructions say, then to the right and then tightened the screw. I got it all done on the first try by this method.
The instructions also say to carry out the assembly with the logo side up; and that would be the "NAPA" logo, not the "NB43" stamp. They are serious about this. Of course my first mistake was to try it upside down. Everything seemed to go together ok, but when you tighten the center screw, the selector won't turn. Assemble "NAPA" side up, no such problem.
The instructions also seem to be very serious about lubrication, it says, "Ratchet mechanisms should be cleaned and lubricated with SAE 30 oil. Never use a heavy weight grease."
Here's the finished product.
(http://i301.photobucket.com/albums/nn48/kxxr/tools/NB43.jpg)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: mrchuck on July 09, 2012, 07:19:40 AM
That exact ratchet is on the end of my 26" long K-D 1/2 inch drive torque wrench.
Made in the USA.
I took the ratchet head apart to lube it with "Super Lube".
I figured it out after several attempts at re-assembly.

Here is what bothers me:
This small ratchet head is on a 280# rated torque wrench.
It is the 'clicker" type, and you also feel it also thru the handle.
 It is also very,very accurate.


Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: mytoolsupplies on September 03, 2012, 06:06:37 AM
Intersting subject also very enlightening, Have you investigated the torque amplifierer for ratchets and sockets?
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: rusty on September 07, 2012, 03:01:31 PM
>This small ratchet head is on a 280# rated torque wrench.

It is a torque limiting ratchet, at 281 foot pounds the ratchet head explodes....
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on September 29, 2012, 02:25:04 PM
NAPA NB43 rebuild:
Here is the repair kit for the NAPA NB43. One end of the spring has a loop, which you can see, and the other end is bent at 90 degrees, which is tough to see in my picture. I got the body for free and the kit was $10.69 at NAPA.
(http://i301.photobucket.com/albums/nn48/kxxr/tools/nb431.jpg)
The instructions say to assemble things as you see here (NAPA side up), and then you are to align the little post on the selector cover so that once it is in place and you turn it to the left, it engages the spring. At that point, you insert the center screw most of the way, turn the selector to the right and tighten the screw (T-15), and you're done. The problem is that it is a blind procedure once you get the cover near the target.
(http://i301.photobucket.com/albums/nn48/kxxr/tools/nb43c-1.jpg)
I made several attempts at that method without success. Then I took the spring out of the ratchet head, placed it in the correct position on the cover plate and, as I peeked through the center hole, I lined the 90 degree end into the pawl hole, then turned the plate to the left as the instructions say, then to the right and then tightened the screw. I got it all done on the first try by this method.
The instructions also say to carry out the assembly with the logo side up; and that would be the "NAPA" logo, not the "NB43" stamp. They are serious about this. Of course my first mistake was to try it upside down. Everything seemed to go together ok, but when you tighten the center screw, the selector won't turn. Assemble "NAPA" side up, no such problem.
The instructions also seem to be very serious about lubrication, it says, "Ratchet mechanisms should be cleaned and lubricated with SAE 30 oil. Never use a heavy weight grease."
Here's the finished product.
(http://i301.photobucket.com/albums/nn48/kxxr/tools/NB43.jpg)

Dang if this rat parts don't look exactly like the latest Craftsman fine tooth guts. Wonder if the parts kit will interchange?
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: mrchuck on September 30, 2012, 07:54:45 AM
I have this NAPA ratchet too, and keep it with the Craftsman's that look exactly like it.
Bet the mfr is the same!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: kxxr on September 30, 2012, 08:56:56 AM
Bonneyman, those innards do look identical and I would be surprised if they did not interchange. I have a Craftsman like yours but yours looks to be a polished finish, mine has more of a brushed or satin finish. I have had it for quite a while and I think it came with a small set. How old are you thinking yours is?
Title: Wright MN60 from 1942
Post by: mtds on October 04, 2012, 05:14:26 PM
This Wright MN60 3/8-drive ratchet caught my eye at a garage sale last weekend.

(http://fototime.com/4C9C73A6FD6401A/large.jpg)

I didn't know anything at all about it, but since my favorite “using” ratchet is a Wright 3490 and the price was right on the older ratchet, I took it home with me.  Next I checked AA and saw that it was date-coded 1942.  I had a seventy year old ratchet.  Not the oldest tool I have, but definitely the oldest ratchet.

(http://fototime.com/510C2A16CEED6D8/large.jpg)

AA went on to say, “This ratchet has an unusual design not previously seen in other tools.”  So I did what anyone else would do: I took it apart and cleaned it.

(http://fototime.com/D6E95D68D5371D3/large.jpg)

Note (picture below) that the gear is controlled by a spring-loaded “peg” that rests in the slot in the selector.  (The spring has a rectangular cross-section.)  Is this the “sliding rod selector/pawl” that bonneyman refers to in the first post in this thread?

(http://fototime.com/6F324DD37E7A701/large.jpg)

Here it is when partially reassembled:

(http://fototime.com/6B3119707EF9ABA/large.jpg)

Another question: What is the function of the spring and ball located in the center of the gear?

(http://fototime.com/708CA8E6673D448/large.jpg)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on October 05, 2012, 11:18:54 AM
Nice pics, mtds!

That is one beefy pawl. And the gear teeth aren't shabby, either!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: mrchuck on October 06, 2012, 03:32:06 PM
I believe the spring and ball acts like a "floating centering shaft" as the teeth engagement load up with torque pressure.
Machining tolerances must be high and true and lots of lubrication for this to work.
The main gear has a "centering shoulder" on it, and must be lubed regularly , or it will wallow out.

Use it, and enjoy the pleasure you will receive from such a nice vintage ratchet!!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: hofferwood on October 23, 2012, 10:46:22 PM
hofferwood,

Thanks for post #13 re: Sparta CS-45 1/2" drive round head.  Your photos of the ratchet core saved my bacon and my sanity today. 

I picked up a nice vintage Husky CS-45 this weekend that was not working smoothly at all.  I took the core out to clean and lube it.  Reassembled it and it was still not working 100%.  So I did a complete disassembly and flattenened both top plates and deburred several pieces.  When I went to reassemble it I had trouble remembering how it came apart.  Then I remembered this thread.  Bingo! Your photos helped me get it back together.  Now all is well with my newly acquired Husky.

For the record, my ratchet has patent 2,291,389 stamped on it.  This is the patent for this Kilness ratchet mechanism.  This patent was applied for in 1957 and issued in 1961.  This patent was assigned to the New Britain Machine Company, where Kilness worked.  There are some really nice illustrations of this ratchet mechanism attached to the patent.

Thanks again...

You're welcome Gary,
A year later, sorry. I have been so overwhelmed with stuff, I haven.t been here  :(
So here's a newer Stanley

(http://i870.photobucket.com/albums/ab269/hofferwood/New%20tool%20box/SD530952.jpg)
(http://i870.photobucket.com/albums/ab269/hofferwood/New%20tool%20box/SD530954.jpg)

They have the "floating" pawl, similar to the Proto "Big Dawg"
(http://i870.photobucket.com/albums/ab269/hofferwood/New%20tool%20box/SD530992.jpg)

It's best to use light oil on these, because grease tends to "Glue" the pawl to the ratchet wheel. Causing "Auto-reverse"
They even put detent balls in the selector to help prevent this.
(http://i870.photobucket.com/albums/ab269/hofferwood/New%20tool%20box/SD530991.jpg)
(http://i870.photobucket.com/albums/ab269/hofferwood/New%20tool%20box/SD530988.jpg)

Chuck
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: James on January 04, 2013, 11:55:01 PM
Dear Sirs;      I'm trying to find a spiiefcc tool, and I need some help.  The tool I'm looking for is a wrench that looks very similar to a crescent wrench.  However, instead of a worm gear adjustment for the jaws it has a spring and pivot arrangement, which when you slide your thumb up under the jaws, they open in a parallel fashion and as you back off after the initial tightening pull it allows the jaws to open and walk the work, on it's way to the next pull.   Any ideas???   I'd appreciate any help.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Papaw on January 05, 2013, 08:42:18 AM
James, that sounds like a type that was made many years ago by several makers,  and is now produced as a "Versa Wrench", and still available.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on January 10, 2013, 04:32:12 PM
Very good pics of the "semi-free" floating pawl design found in Stanleys (and others!), Chuck!

Here's my latest acquisition - my first S-K Frankenstein ratchet. 3/8" Very lightly used, some drawer wear if anything. Very slight wear on the pawl as well - the internals were very clean and shiny. A keeper!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: EVILDR235 on January 10, 2013, 05:14:20 PM
I picked up a Frankenstein ratchet last summer. It is the world famous Globemaster.

EvilDr235
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on January 22, 2013, 05:23:54 PM
Just noticed the thread total views. All I can say is, "WOW"! Not even two years old, and already approaching 7500 views. I guess that means people really like the thread and use it as a resource.

Well, keep looking. And keep adding pics. We like ratchet photos!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on February 13, 2013, 03:34:48 PM
Picked up a non-functional Williams M-51  1/4" today. Soaking didn't free it up, and I pretty much destroyed the thing getting it apart. Too bad - the gear and pawl were in fine shape. At least now I know how to disassemble this style in the future. Plus, we can all see the guts!
Batman pawl with 2 teeth per wing, 24 tooth gear.

The gear comes out the front after unscrewing the two-hole disc. The little metal rod/pin on the selector knob (not shown in the pic) gets pulled out with pliers. Then, the selector screw can be turned out to remove the pawl and gain access to the ball and spring.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: lauver on February 22, 2013, 04:47:33 PM
Just noticed the thread total views. All I can say is, "WOW"! Not even two years old, and already approaching 7500 views. I guess that means people really like the thread and use it as a resource.

Well, keep looking. And keep adding pics. We like ratchet photos!

bonneyman,

Your are correct, this thread is getting some serious traffic; and that's because this thread has something to offer to a fairly broad cross-section of members and visiters.

Now, the other side of the statistics (i.e. the number of replies); as of now their are 129 replies vs. 7,981 views.   Replies represent 1.6% of the total views.  Why is this important.  Because the folks who post are contributing to the thread.  The other 98.4% are mining the thread for content, getting what they want, and a leaving without contributing a thing to the thread.  This thread deserves and needs active member who contribute content to the thread.  As for inactive members and non contributing visiters... we could probably do without most of them.

Your thoughts? 
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: jnc on February 23, 2013, 12:51:48 PM
looking for parts for an Indestro #6272 3/8 ratchet (forward /reverse lever) any parts out there?
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on February 25, 2013, 07:33:23 PM
Just noticed the thread total views. All I can say is, "WOW"! Not even two years old, and already approaching 7500 views. I guess that means people really like the thread and use it as a resource.

Well, keep looking. And keep adding pics. We like ratchet photos!

bonneyman,

Your are correct, this thread is getting some serious traffic; and that's because this thread has something to offer to a fairly broad cross-section of members and visiters.

Now, the other side of the statistics (i.e. the number of replies); as of now their are 129 replies vs. 7,981 views.   Replies represent 1.6% of the total views.  Why is this important.  Because the folks who post are contributing to the thread.  The other 98.4% are mining the thread for content, getting what they want, and a leaving without contributing a thing to the thread.  This thread deserves and needs active member who contribute content to the thread.  As for inactive members and non contributing visiters... we could probably do without most of them.

Your thoughts?

If the question was directed at me, I personally don't feel slighted if people view and don't post. I always considered this an informational thread, and Papaw was gracious enough to give it the sticky status and take up space on his forum. Many thanks, Noel!
I have gotten so much out of the thread, learning from what others say and post, I think I've gotten the better end of the deal for the time and effort I put into it. Although, I gotta say, doing a google search one time brought up this thread and my ratchet pictures right on the first page! Apparently someone linked the post (or whatever you call it), and had the rat pics on their site for instructional purposes. Have to say I was surprised - and a little stunned - about that.
Title: New additions 3/1/13
Post by: bonneyman on March 03, 2013, 05:13:17 PM
An EASCO RHFT in 3/8" and a Bonney V-702K 1/4" (also a RHFT design, though no QR).
The EASCO has minimal wear inside - both the head and pawl teeth are sharp and crisp. Did a total disassembly for proper cleaning and lube - and pics. And I can see why the design was discontinued - all those little parts and machining probably pushed costs up to high.
I have another Bonney in 1/4", same model number, but it's a bit shorter, wider handle, and stamping is smaller and crisper, too. Could be end-of-life production?
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on April 11, 2013, 03:18:07 PM
Got a new ratchet in this week from Ken W. An older model Bonney 3/8" flex, T-702. After a 4 day soak in acetone/ATF (amongst others) it's finally turning freely.
Has dual sliding pawls (not see-saw). Head has 45 teeth, very compact design for a 3/8". And I really like the tapered handle!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: lauver on April 12, 2013, 07:49:50 PM
Gang,

I found an interesting ratchet that is so unique it deserves a post in this thread.  Functionally, it is like a combination of a flex handle breaker bar and a ratchet.  Made by New Britain, the NB50 3/8 drive flex ratchet was first introduced in 1953 and ran until at least 1958, but could possibly have run into the mid 1960's.

Here's a photo of the assembled ratchet...
(http://i366.photobucket.com/albums/oo109/lauver_photos/NB50RatchetingFlexHandle_zpsaf1c25ca.jpg)

Here's a  top view photo of the disassembled ratchet...
(http://i366.photobucket.com/albums/oo109/lauver_photos/NB50RatchetingFlexHandle2_zps9e42d689.jpg)

Here's a lower angle photo of the disassembled ratchet...
(http://i366.photobucket.com/albums/oo109/lauver_photos/NB50RatchetingFlexHandle3_zpsf26ac251.jpg)

Here's a closeup photo of the spring plunger that controls the reverse lever (in this case the ratchet handle)...
(http://i366.photobucket.com/albums/oo109/lauver_photos/NB50RatchetingFlexHandle4_zps918e2e89.jpg)

This ratchet can be completely disassembled by removing two pins, one that locks the turret shaped head on the handle, and one that  locks the pawl/spring/ball assembly togather.  It should be noted that the hardest part of reassembly is installing the pawl/spring/ball assembly as it requires more than two hands.  Everything else goes back together quite easily and logically.

I am unaware of anyone else that has run across one of these unique ratchets in the wild.  If any of you have seen one, let me know.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: rusty on April 13, 2013, 06:32:03 AM
Very interesting, and odd. A variation on Allen's ratchet patent for a swivel head ratchet with a spherical gear. probably just about the time the original patent expired....
I was unaware anyone else had made a ratchet on that design....
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: lauver on April 13, 2013, 11:32:36 AM
rusty,

Do you have the patent no. for the Allan ratchet design?  I'd like to look at it and see if there are any noteworthy differences.

Thanks for any help.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: rusty on April 13, 2013, 03:22:26 PM

1,261,092 from 1918

http://www.datamp.org/patents/displayPatent.php?number=1261092&typeCode=0

Datamp doesn't seem to have a photo of an actual one, I will have to photograph mine (current photos are junk)

Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: lauver on April 13, 2013, 07:26:31 PM

1,261,092 from 1918

http://www.datamp.org/patents/displayPatent.php?number=1261092&typeCode=0

Datamp doesn't seem to have a photo of an actual one, I will have to photograph mine (current photos are junk)

rusty,

Thanks for digging up the patent no. for me.  The Allen ratchet does indeed have a ball gear.  Do you know how long tool patent coverage typically lasts? 

Also, if you search the same patent no. on Google Patents you'll find a nice illustration.   
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: rusty on April 13, 2013, 08:17:43 PM
>Do you know how long tool patent coverage typically lasts? 

Varies a bit depending on when, for 1918, with no special extensions, it would expire for a utility patent in 17 years.

Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: lauver on April 15, 2013, 08:26:36 AM
rusty,

Since the Allen patent ratchet is early and unique, would you mind posting a photo of it?  I can add the patent drawing so folks can see how it is constructed and how it works. 

Also, are there any clues as to who might have manufactured it?
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on April 15, 2013, 05:08:47 PM
Thanks for posting pics of your NB ratchet, Gary. It truly is an amazing mechanism.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: rusty on April 15, 2013, 06:31:19 PM
It turns out Alloy Artifacts has a photo, but I will try to remember to take pics of mine.

It is Highly likely, but not provable, that Billings & Spencer made them, as B&S made later ratchet/socket sets for Allen Tool...
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: lauver on April 16, 2013, 10:04:37 AM
Thanks rusty,

I borrowed the Alloy Artifacts photo and will post it here for those who are interested.  I will add the patent illustrations later that shows the inner workings:

Allen Universal Wrench, patent pending, ca. 1914-1918
(http://i366.photobucket.com/albums/oo109/lauver_photos/AllenUniversalRatchetca1914-1918_zps46b94a3f.jpg) (http://s366.photobucket.com/user/lauver_photos/media/AllenUniversalRatchetca1914-1918_zps46b94a3f.jpg.html)

Title: Proto Challenger 3/8
Post by: bonneyman on April 26, 2013, 12:07:08 PM
I uncovered this gem while digging thru a deep box of grimy stuff. Just jumped out at me.
Can't imagine why someone sold it to a pawn shop. Thing just needed some love.
After a deep solvent cleaning slapped her back together and put her on my shop pegboard so she can get back to work.
Double see-saw pawls (very stout), yet fine action and thin external head profile. She goes perfectly with the 1/2"er I've had for some time.
Title: Another little Steiny rat!
Post by: bonneyman on May 02, 2013, 04:44:42 PM
Found this 1/4" Frankenstein ratchet today, and, although there are already internal pics elsewhere in the sticky, it's so cool I figured you all wouldn't mind a few pics.
The guy I bought it from said that, until I came in there and bought two such ratchets, neither he nor his boss had ever heard of a frankenstein ratchet.
This design is attributed to Wright tools, and that's borne out by patent info: https://patents.google.com/patent/US2701977
Title: My latest acquisition: A 1/4" Herbrand
Post by: bonneyman on May 17, 2013, 07:43:34 PM
In honor of almost 10,000 views, I'm posting the latest ratchet to find its way past my desk.
A Herbrand 1/4" M-5. 24 teeth, tic-toc pawls.
The sliding selector had a spring-loaded ball in the end, which engages a slight "dimple" on the front cover to hold it to the right or left. If the front cover isn't on tight, there's no engagement of this dimple, and the selector won't stay put - hence, the gear "locks" up, and won't turn either way. Makes it seem like the ratchet is toast, so, one can get it cheaply. As I did this one. A good cleaning and lubing, and it works like new.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: humber2 on May 23, 2013, 02:55:57 AM
Sidchrome 14912 1/2" drive, no COO, who made it?

I can't see how to dismantle it, it needs a new detent spring for the switch.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: metaldad on May 27, 2013, 11:02:18 AM
Thank you for this thread, gents. Wish I knew it was here, before I took apart my new K-D rhft ratchets for lubing. Took 1 apart, couldn't for the life of me get it together rite. Took the 2nd apart to note orietation, and promptly dropped it. (oops!).
Had to 'play' with the pin to catch the spring, and jiggle it when tightening.
KXXR's reply # 113 kinda explains it.
O'Rielly's is clearancing these out for a fraction of the price. They have been sitting on the shelf a long time, and the lube is non existent.
Haven't opened the 3/8's yet.
(http://i448.photobucket.com/albums/qq210/heavymetaldad/kd_zps8b483214.jpg) (http://s448.photobucket.com/user/heavymetaldad/media/kd_zps8b483214.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: humber2 on May 27, 2013, 10:00:34 PM
My rat in post #148 appears to be the same design or manufacturer as the smaller one on page 5 #73

I'll retry when I'm back home and report in.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on May 30, 2013, 11:14:59 AM
Humber, your little ratchet looks like the gear cluster comes out the front. Hence, somehow the selector lever on the back has to come off so the cluster can slide out the front. Could be a press fit? Can't really tell from the pics. though, if someone else has a closeup of that lever or first-hand knowledge of that rat style, that would help alot.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: jimwrench on June 14, 2013, 12:56:23 PM
 Got this Cornwell JR-5 open rat last night. Not shown in my 1986 cat so assume its older than that. Has a Tru-Arc type snap ring holding pawl retaining pin in place. Would disassemble but have no reason to and I'd probably lose something. Anyone know vintage?
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: lauver on June 14, 2013, 01:10:13 PM
jimwrench,

Your JR-5 ratchet is not in the 1955 catalog either.  And there were no ratchets, in any drive size, with that design.  I'm thinking your ratchet is earlier yet.

Just guessing here, but I'm thinking 1935 - 1949 based on the general appearance of their tools during this period.  After that, their tools took on a more modern look.

The "7" stamped on the ratchet handle could be a date code.  If so, it could be 1937 or 1947 based on my guestimated date range.  Your ratchet is also stamped with the "Cornwell Man" trademark, which is thought to have gone into use about 1946.  This would tend to argue for the 1947 date.  Your call...  hope this helps or get you thinking.
Title: The EASCO RHFT and Craftsman RHFT connection
Post by: bonneyman on June 25, 2013, 01:22:31 PM
As has been been mentioned before, EASCO made the RHFT ratchets for Craftsman. Thus, the gear sets are interchangeable. Since I have one of both 1/4" types in my possession at the moment, I thought it was worth a pic to show this connection. The model numbers of both rats are clearly visible so anybody needing a kit for one can be on the lookout for the other part # as well.
Title: Older Williams M-51 1/4"er
Post by: bonneyman on August 27, 2013, 03:23:38 PM
Pulled a sweet old thing out of a tool box full of mediocre stuff the other day, and it needed clean and lube, so....she gets a write-up.

24 tooth, batman pawl, nice chrome, cool handle shape. But too small for my hands.

Original patent?: http://www.datamp.org/patents/search/advance.php?pn=1957462&id=27942&set=90
Title: Husky CB41 3/8"er
Post by: bonneyman on September 20, 2013, 02:31:37 PM
Came across an old 3/8" Husky ratchet today.
Standard batman pawl, 2 teeth per wing.
24 tooth gear.

Related patent: https://patents.google.com/patent/US2542241
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on September 20, 2013, 02:43:20 PM
looking for parts for an Indestro #6272 3/8 ratchet (forward /reverse lever) any parts out there?

Just saw this request. Long overdue response, but, I have "made" selector levers for this type of rat. The 3/8 and 1/2 below have homemade selector levers, secured by a drop of epoxy.
Title: Action 3/8"
Post by: bonneyman on November 02, 2013, 11:48:55 AM
Came across an Action 3/8" 77JA. I'm told that Action was the economy line of Thorsen.
See-saw pawl, 3-teeth per wing, 36 teeth.
Very tough mechanism. Here is a view of the Action besides an S-K 45170 mechanism (which I can attest is very durable!). The Action pawl dwarfs the S-K pawl, being more than twice as wide!
Title: Plombs: Old and older
Post by: bonneyman on November 02, 2013, 11:55:22 AM
I have two older Plomb ratchets on my desk this morning. They are both what I would call pear-head rats, and - not being a Plomb expert - I never realized the different styles. (It's like with the Craftsman ratchets - until you put them side-by-side they all kinda look the same).  Since this is the first time I've had two such old Plombs at one time, I figured we should pull'em apart and take a look at them guts!
The one on the left is a 4749 1/4", the one on the right is a WF-8 9/32" drive. The little screws on both are 2-56, though one uses a pair of flathead philips and the other a single round head phillips. Both have 24 tooth gears, but the end bushings are different, so, no interchanging is possible. The pawls on both are tic-tocs, but very different, so, those are not switchable either.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: B17E1943 on November 12, 2013, 11:35:36 PM
Bonneyman asked me to post my weekend ratchet find over here, so here it is. It's a 1/2" drive KANE pat. pend. 2070 ratchet. I wasn't able to find ANY info on this company and only found one other identical ratchet, including a KANE socket on Worthpoint. http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedi...pend-117867486

I have never seen a mechanism like it, though I'm no expert. The mechanism is held in by a screw in the front, and a snap ring on the back. I was afraid I'd screw it up, so I didn't pop off the snap-ring to remove the whole mechanism. Like an IDIOT, and I KNOW better, I turned the ratchet without the cover on, and the spring flew off into the dirt/leaves. I was damn lucky that I found it, cuz I'm pretty sure it's unobtainium. 

It doesn't have a COO stamp, so I don't know where it was made. It is very well constructed and has a crisp ratcheting action; I didn't count the teeth.

I neglected to take a pic of the back of the front cover, but there is a pin on it just off-center of the screw hole that fits into the hole below the half loop in the spring - that reverses it with about 1/8? turn of the cover.

Anyone ever seen one of these, or heard of the company? Thanks!

(http://i222.photobucket.com/albums/dd69/da66chevelless/Tools%20and%20tool%20stuff/Kane2070ratchetbought11-9-2013013cropped_zps51d3a9bc.jpg) (http://s222.photobucket.com/user/da66chevelless/media/Tools%20and%20tool%20stuff/Kane2070ratchetbought11-9-2013013cropped_zps51d3a9bc.jpg.html)

(http://i222.photobucket.com/albums/dd69/da66chevelless/Tools%20and%20tool%20stuff/Kane2070ratchetbought11-9-2013012cropped_zps803f71c9.jpg) (http://s222.photobucket.com/user/da66chevelless/media/Tools%20and%20tool%20stuff/Kane2070ratchetbought11-9-2013012cropped_zps803f71c9.jpg.html)

(http://i222.photobucket.com/albums/dd69/da66chevelless/Tools%20and%20tool%20stuff/Kane2070ratchetbought11-9-2013014cropped_zps49835fba.jpg) (http://s222.photobucket.com/user/da66chevelless/media/Tools%20and%20tool%20stuff/Kane2070ratchetbought11-9-2013014cropped_zps49835fba.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: kxxr on November 13, 2013, 06:51:25 AM
The socket looks like SK.
(http://i301.photobucket.com/albums/nn48/kxxr/tools/kane1.jpg)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on November 13, 2013, 03:18:20 PM
Thanks for posting those pics, B17.
That has got to be one of the top three wildest ratchet mechanisms I've seen. And I've look at alot of ratchets!

The off-center pin on the inside of the selector knob/disc is how it shifts directions. It move's the spring just enough to allow one pawl to engage while the other gets bypassed. And the spring allows enough movement when ratcheting so the engaged pawl can slip past the teeth.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: B17E1943 on November 14, 2013, 10:07:41 PM
My pleasure, bman.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on November 16, 2013, 04:52:23 PM
Picked up a RHFT in 3/8" today, along with some extensions. Took the rat apart for the usual clean and lube...and it was anything but usual! Dang there were alot of parts in there - 13 pieces in all!
Must be the earlier style of RHFT, as a pin extends out from the knuckle when the QR button is pushed. Has a patent number forged on the handle. I'll have to see if I can determine the age of this one, and when Craftsman simplified their RHFT mechanism.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Bus on November 16, 2013, 05:15:13 PM
It's a 1968 patent assigned to Moore Drop Forging Co.

http://www.google.com/patents/US3467231 (http://www.google.com/patents/US3467231)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: lauver on November 21, 2013, 12:52:32 PM
It's a 1968 patent assigned to Moore Drop Forging Co.

http://www.google.com/patents/US3467231 (http://www.google.com/patents/US3467231)

While it's true that MDF originaly held rights to the patent, they never got to put these ratchets into production.  Easco bought MDF outright in 1968 and got the patent rights as well as the Sears/Craftsman contract. 

The first Crafty RHFT ratchets (3/8" & 1/2" drive) were sold by Sears in 1970.  In 1971, the 1/4" drive RHFT was added.  Over the next 38 years, other models including long handle & flex handle versions in various drive sizes were added.  All in all, these ratchets enjoyed a 40 year run.  In my mind, these are some of the best ratchets ever sold under the Craftsman brand.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on November 21, 2013, 03:11:38 PM
It's a 1968 patent assigned to Moore Drop Forging Co.

http://www.google.com/patents/US3467231 (http://www.google.com/patents/US3467231)

While it's true that MDF originaly held rights to the patent, they never got to put these ratchets into production.  Easco bought MDF outright in 1968 and got the patent rights as well as the Sears/Craftsman contract. 

The first Crafty RHFT ratchets (3/8" & 1/2" drive) were sold by Sears in 1970.  In 1971, the 1/4" drive RHFT was added.  Over the next 38 years, other models including long handle & flex handle versions in various drive sizes were added. All in all, this these ratchets enjoyed a 40 year run. In my mind, these are some of the best ratchets ever sold under the Craftsman brand.

And yet, rebuild kits are almost impossible to find. Go figure.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: lauver on November 21, 2013, 05:00:09 PM
b-man,

Nothing surprises me about Sears or it's suppliers.  I would, however, expect the aftermarket to be swimming in NOS rebuild kits.  I take it this is not the case?

I recall Cripes was selling NOS rebuild kits as recently as a year or two ago; haven't checked lately.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on November 21, 2013, 10:02:35 PM
I have not seen many. A few. I see alot more LLTD rebuild kits.
And guys always seem to be asking about where to get RHFT kits. So, I'm kinda assuming they are not around. maybe someone is sitting on a stash, just waiting for all other sources to dry up?
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: RedVise on November 23, 2013, 07:20:26 PM
Figured I needed to post a Thank You for this thread, as I opened up a NB ratchet this evening, after checking out the details here first.

Thanks to all !!

Brian
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on November 25, 2013, 09:11:58 PM
Figured I needed to post a Thank You for this thread, as I opened up a NB ratchet this evening, after checking out the details here first.

Thanks to all !!

Brian

You are welcome! That's what this is here for.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on December 21, 2013, 05:10:12 PM
Got another 1/2" rat today in the mail. An old Bonney AA 707. (looks like Toolpants and wvginseng have one also).
I'm calling it the "sweetheart" ratchet, due to the prominent heart-shaped stamp on the back cover plate. Free floating pawl design. 
https://patents.google.com/patent/US3019682
This thing is built like a Sherman tank! The drive gear is one huge, thick piece of forged steel that seems way over-designed. But, back then they built tools to last.

P.S. This free floating pawl design has been redesigned, and has become the almost universal "Canoe" free floating pawl in most superhigh tooth count pear head designs.
Title: Ever wonder how those offset ratcheting screwdrivers work?
Post by: bonneyman on February 08, 2014, 11:06:42 AM
Picked up a rusty, frozen driver today. Just wanted to see what was inside, figured it was worth a quarter.
Reversible design. Has a single pawl with two teeth that "rocks" back and forth to engage and slip like an old clock movement. I'll call it a flip toggle pawl. Seems like most of the reversible mini-ratchets utilize the same mechanism. (YANKEE, General Tool, etc.

By not using rivets this is easy to take apart, clean, lube, and re-bolt together.
Works as good as new!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Chillylulu on February 08, 2014, 05:30:32 PM
I know its been a month and a half, but sometime could you get a picture of the Bonney AA 77 with just the cover off and the mechanism's in place?

Thanks,
Chilly
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on February 09, 2014, 12:08:29 AM
He's those pics of the Bonney you requested.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on March 05, 2014, 08:39:51 PM
Well folks, it looks like sometime last week we passed 15k views. People still ask me about this thread, and I've gotten more than a few pats on the back for doing it. It really seems to help folks. And I found one of my ratchet comparison photos on somebody's website!

Thanks and keep on lookin!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Papaw on March 05, 2014, 09:08:53 PM
Keep on running the thread! It is a treasure.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: mrchuck on March 06, 2014, 07:15:24 AM
I get "stuck" sometimes when looking into the "guts" of a ratchet. So,,,,what do I do?I bring up this website, go to this forum, and look up this posting.
It has made "the day" for me many times.
Thanks Bonneyman!!!! You are the EMT of ratchet knowledge and repair !!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: B17E1943 on March 08, 2014, 04:37:13 AM
...

An easy-to-spot "Frankenstein" ratchet, so named because the switching rod sticks out of the neck of the head. S-K and Wright also made "Steiny" rats...

(Post #2 first page)



B-man - I bought a Frankenstein rat identical to yours last Friday. I could not figure out how to get it apart until I did a search and came across this thread.

I got the handle unscrewed, but how the heck do you get the guts out of the head?!

Did you ever figure out a manufacturer? No markings at all ...

(http://i222.photobucket.com/albums/dd69/da66chevelless/Tools%20and%20tool%20stuff/NoIDquarter-inchFrankensteinratchetbought2-28-2014003cropped_zpsff474758.jpg) (http://s222.photobucket.com/user/da66chevelless/media/Tools%20and%20tool%20stuff/NoIDquarter-inchFrankensteinratchetbought2-28-2014003cropped_zpsff474758.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: mrchuck on March 08, 2014, 01:56:05 PM
I have one just like this, 1/4" drive. I just put oil in it and it was good to go into the 1/4" ratchet drawer.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on March 08, 2014, 05:43:29 PM
Glad you found us here!
When I snagged my first one, I posted it and asked who made it. Various suggestions, but the consensus was Wright tools.
I sold it, as it was too flimsy to really torque on it. And regretted it almost immediately. Was lucky to find another 1/4" and also snagged an S-K 3/8".
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on June 10, 2014, 10:02:40 PM
...

An easy-to-spot "Frankenstein" ratchet, so named because the switching rod sticks out of the neck of the head. S-K and Wright also made "Steiny" rats...

(Post #2 first page)





B-man - I bought a Frankenstein rat identical to yours last Friday. I could not figure out how to get it apart until I did a search and came across this thread.

I got the handle unscrewed, but how the heck do you get the guts out of the head?!

Did you ever figure out a manufacturer? No markings at all ...

(http://i222.photobucket.com/albums/dd69/da66chevelless/Tools%20and%20tool%20stuff/NoIDquarter-inchFrankensteinratchetbought2-28-2014003cropped_zpsff474758.jpg) (http://s222.photobucket.com/user/da66chevelless/media/Tools%20and%20tool%20stuff/NoIDquarter-inchFrankensteinratchetbought2-28-2014003cropped_zpsff474758.jpg.html)

Glad to hear my/our little thread here is attracting web attention, and allowed you to find us.
Sorry for the delayed reply. Been a while since I've been searching.
The consensus for the manufacturer is Wright.
Once the handle is unscrewed, the spring should fall out with the ball. You then pry off the press-fit retaining ring on the front of the knuckle gear, and then pull the gear out of the back of the ratchet head. Then the selector rod should slide out.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on June 10, 2014, 10:08:03 PM
My latest acquisition - a Chapman mini-ratchet that was frozen and thus required dis-assembly for cleaning and lubing. Thus, you all get to see them guts!
Non-reversible hex drive. A single tic-toc pawl, looks like 20 tooth gear.

Sorry, I was so intent on fixing it and getting it back together - with rivets! - that I forgot to get a close-up with the pawl engaging the drive gear. But I think you can figure out how the pawl and spring sit in the machined grooves of the three stiffener plates.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: mrchuck on June 11, 2014, 07:13:46 AM
Regarding the 1/4"ratchet,, There was one on eBay this last week with a price of 29 dollars, and I did NOT bid on it, as I thought this price was just too High!
It did NOT sell,,,no bids.
The "frankenstein" models I have , I don't use them, collectors only.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on June 11, 2014, 08:11:47 AM
Regarding the 1/4"ratchet,, There was one on eBay this last week with a price of 29 dollars, and I did NOT bid on it, as I thought this price was just too High!
It did NOT sell,,,no bids.
The "frankenstein" models I have , I don't use them, collectors only.

10-4 I would use mine if it will get me out of a jam - but only if nothing else will do, and it's a low torque application.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: B17E1943 on June 11, 2014, 10:30:01 PM
Glad to hear my/our little thread here is attracting web attention, and allowed you to find us.
Sorry for the delayed reply. Been a while since I've been searching.
The consensus for the manufacturer is Wright.
Once the handle is unscrewed, the spring should fall out with the ball. You then pry off the press-fit retaining ring on the front of the knuckle gear, and then pull the gear out of the back of the ratchet head. Then the selector rod should slide out.

Thanks, B-man - I wasn't able to get that retaining ring out and I kinda bunged it up in my attempt, so I gave up for now. Not even sure where the thing is at this point. One of these days ...
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on June 12, 2014, 12:12:49 PM
Well, if you find it and can't get it fixed, send it to me. I'd love to have a spare one of those.  :smiley:

Let me see if I can find the pics of the dis-assembly process. That might help you out.
Update: here they are. Notice I buggared up my retainer ring a little, too.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on June 15, 2014, 10:24:43 AM
I'd like to wish everybody a happy fathers day...and thank all who have contributed to the thread, as we are approaching 17,000 views. Just glad that we're helping folks out here, and that the thread comes up on internet searches. Should help bring more members in.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on September 28, 2014, 07:27:15 PM
Falling down on the job a little here - didn't catch our 20,000 view until now.
Thanks for all the interest, folks!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bear_man on September 30, 2014, 10:37:54 PM
I too just now found this conversation and have a little 1/4"-er myself.  Now I'm gonna hafta go back through the thread to learn how to pull the swing handle out of it.  PS: I only use it for light stuff and don't have any problems with it, but I do like to Know "just in case."  Thanks!   -bear
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: OkieTools on January 06, 2015, 11:35:57 AM
Love this thread, great info. Papaw suggested I post this video here, it is me taking apart and lubing my Papa's late 1960s Husky CB-45 RH ratchet.
(http://i1343.photobucket.com/albums/o795/yustinus1973/IMG_1428_zps489e9ea0.jpg) (http://s1343.photobucket.com/user/yustinus1973/media/IMG_1428_zps489e9ea0.jpg.html)
http://youtu.be/GvRSQwUyJjs.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: OkieTools on January 07, 2015, 09:39:04 PM
Here is the other video I told Papaw I would post. This is my Fleet 1650-2 "model-2" 1/2in. drive roundhead ratchet, it was my father in-law's. He let me have an old rusted tool box full of crap, in the bottom was a old pillow case, full of 1/2in. metric Popular Mechanic's sockets, and this late 1960's Fleet rat. The Fleet was rusted so bad, I could not even tell what it was, I just put it in the bottom of my tool box and forgot about it. Until I got some evapo-rust from HF, and put it in, thinking if this brings this old rat back to life then it must be good stuff. Well it worked, and after it was all cleaned up I did some research and found out I had a nice jem of a vintage rat, thanks to my father in-law. This video is me taking it apart and lubing it, enjoy. Thanks.
(http://i1343.photobucket.com/albums/o795/yustinus1973/IMG_1426_zps19412791.jpg) (http://s1343.photobucket.com/user/yustinus1973/media/IMG_1426_zps19412791.jpg.html)
http://youtu.be/NsOzepoWF4o.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on January 08, 2015, 08:14:17 AM
Great video, Okie! That gear cluster design held in by a coiled flat spring seems to be a real popular one. Very similar to Thorsen Action, Bonney, etc.
Probably also some NB types - though I've never come across any of those in person.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: turnnut on January 08, 2015, 02:19:39 PM
Okie, I enjoyed your video on the ratchet.

what would make your videos pop, would be showing a picture of the tool
before you start the cleaning process.

keep up the good work.

thanks, Frank 
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Old Hawaiian on January 10, 2015, 09:10:36 AM
GREAT to see familiar faces in here!!  Awesome Pics with Tear Down and Reassembly Tips and Tricks! Hey that could be a separate Topic - one just for T&T.

Shout out 'Howdy' to GG folks.  Lets see if we can't cant push the sound barrier to 40000 views  ;) Howdy B-Man and Mr. Chuck and if i missed anyone refer to rule 1.

Rule 1 - I'm old and forgetful, feeble minded can't always see past my glasses and Ahh... I know there's one more --  oh ya, i fart a lot.

Old Hawaiian / Rick
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: OkieTools on January 10, 2015, 11:41:12 AM
Thanks Bonneyman.
Good idea Turnnut, for my next video ill take a few pics before I clean them up, thanks. 
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: BurninBob on January 17, 2015, 12:55:29 PM
Just got this this morning.
Lowell no.0,female 3/8 drive.
Appears to be extremely heavy duty,like a Plomb on steroids.
16 tooth and veery smooth action.
To reverse direction,you just turn the knob at the base of the handle.
Naturally,I had to open it up and have a peek and share here.
Lubed it up while I was there.
They are still in business,Lowellcorp.com.
Title: New-to-me 3/8" rat: MAC X8R
Post by: bonneyman on March 03, 2015, 04:51:18 PM
Looks like a New Britain derivative mechanism. Standard traps to be avoided (flip spring in right way, don't pinch finger when reassembling with the little E-clip) and detent ball was stuck and then the spring was toast. Replaced the spring and reassembled with lube - good as new.

It seems that Stanley Tools absorbed the NB design - alot of their ratchets use it. I've seen some Blackhawk, Pro America, Proto, Matco BR8N, that are the same. So, someone needing a kit for this one could probably insert one of the other (available) kits, and it would drop right in. 45 teeth in the head, 9 teeth on the pawl.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: OkieTools on March 03, 2015, 09:11:08 PM
Nice, love New Britain Rats, most of what I got is Husky marked.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: OkieTools on March 07, 2015, 05:23:39 PM
I made a new rat video, it's of a vintage Thorsen 77C 1/2in. drive roundhead ratchet, disassembly and lubrication. Thanks for watching.
(http://i1343.photobucket.com/albums/o795/yustinus1973/IMG_1674_zpszbs6k2rm.jpg) (http://s1343.photobucket.com/user/yustinus1973/media/IMG_1674_zpszbs6k2rm.jpg.html)
Link: http://youtu.be/vLSoK68KgJ0
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on March 07, 2015, 05:35:18 PM
Nice vid! 
That style of Thorsen ratchet has been explained to me as the AK47 of the ratchet world. Very tough.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: OkieTools on March 07, 2015, 05:39:18 PM
Got another ratchet video, of an S-K 42470 1/2in. Drive Roundhead Ratchet Disassembly & Lubrication. Thanks for watching.
(http://i1343.photobucket.com/albums/o795/yustinus1973/IMG_1675_zpsgd8rueqb.jpg) (http://s1343.photobucket.com/user/yustinus1973/media/IMG_1675_zpsgd8rueqb.jpg.html)
Link: http://youtu.be/B7tUOEvIEDk
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: OkieTools on March 07, 2015, 05:44:33 PM
Thanks Bonneyman, I believe it about the AK-47 part, this thing is built like a tank, as you can see from the video I am very impressed with the size of the teeth on it. I also have a video I'm going to put on of a 3/8in Drive Thorsen flex-head rat.     
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: OkieTools on March 07, 2015, 05:51:37 PM
Here is the video I was telling Bonneyman about, it is my video on a vintage Thorsen 88JNR Vintage 3/8in. Drive Flex Head Roundhead Ratchet Disassembly & Lubrication. Thanks for watching.
(http://i1343.photobucket.com/albums/o795/yustinus1973/IMG_1666_zpszyht1fw9.jpg) (http://s1343.photobucket.com/user/yustinus1973/media/IMG_1666_zpszyht1fw9.jpg.html)
http://youtu.be/yLXC-MXN82s
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on March 09, 2015, 09:54:53 AM
JH Williams 1/4" drive M-52.
Single see-saw pawl, 3 teeth per wing. 45 teeth in the head. Flat coil spring with bushing rather then the 4-notch screw-in ring that I'm used to with old Williams rats.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: OkieTools on March 09, 2015, 10:42:38 AM
Nice Williams rat there bonneyman. I do not have a lot of 1/4in. ratchets, but back when I was in aviation man I used them all the time, and even now I seem to always need one for something or another, on what ever car I'm working on then.
Title: Wright "Tootsie Roll" 3/8"
Post by: bonneyman on March 10, 2015, 04:25:04 PM
MN 400 
Single see-saw pawl, 41 teeth in head. Shorter than the average 3/8" drive ratchet, nice grip, very much like the Thorsen ratchets. Me likey!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: jimwrench on March 31, 2015, 04:11:48 PM
 Got these two at auction Saturday. I know snap-on and I know wright but haven't seen both names on one ratchet and don't find this rat on collecting snap-on. Also wonder about the IH5449 on the proto ratchet. Any information would make me happy,happy,happy.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: OkieTools on March 31, 2015, 08:22:59 PM
Bonneyman that Wright ratchet looks so much like a Thosen it's not funny, me likey to.
Jim those rats are nice, very interesting both Wright and Snap-on names on the same ratchet.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: FAISAL on April 17, 2015, 04:15:26 PM
this is  Williams No, E1-24 THE SUPERECTOR 1" square Ratchet Wrench 25" Length ,the gear is really big and the sound of the ratchet is horrible ..LOL

still i don't know when its manufactured ,any idea?

(http://i.imgur.com/Ez6safO.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/VfyS28n.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/lLxdCbJ.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/muCum0e.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/D6nxoai.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/fxaQLfm.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/F1Q8heT.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/nLLRAlC.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/wq7zf28.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/8JnE3lg.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/VoxmKNz.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/YEomGlL.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/ZYUMT38.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/Sz2v3Qo.jpg?1)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Papaw on April 17, 2015, 04:33:03 PM
That is certainly a "Super ratchet"!

We saw one here- http://www.papawswrench.com/vboard/index.php?topic=2054.0 (http://www.papawswrench.com/vboard/index.php?topic=2054.0)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: FAISAL on April 17, 2015, 06:11:31 PM
these are Craftsman 1/2,3/8 and 1/4-drive ratchets with a "V"-shaped shifter, stamped with the "Craftsman" double-line logo on the raised panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and a "V" code on the reverse panel.

1/2" overall length is 10.3 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.
3/8" overall length is 6.8 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.
1/4" overall length is 5.2 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The ratchet head is fitted with an oil hole closed by a steel ball
Although not marked with a patent notice, the design of the V-shaped shifter is described by patent #D185,651, issued to R.M. Vose in 1959 with assignment to Moore Drop Forging.


(http://i.imgur.com/Yiv5iWR.jpg)
(http://i.imgur.com/TtaUgPJ.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/kacEkAP.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/DoFEsRb.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/wwSfLQC.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/iAmt3ah.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/Kqp7Scv.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/bhfFKaE.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/o0pcpml.jpg)

thank you for watching
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on April 17, 2015, 07:08:00 PM
Nice rat pics, faisel!

The Craftsman are classic "batman" pawl. So named because the pawl looks like the bat signal from the 60's TV show "Batman".

Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Papaw on April 17, 2015, 07:09:33 PM
Excellent posts, Faisal!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: turnnut on April 17, 2015, 07:33:15 PM
thanks for sharing, I like the pictures.

and also a big welcome from Massachusetts.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: FAISAL on April 17, 2015, 09:50:44 PM
thanks for sharing, I like the pictures.

and also a big welcome from Massachusetts.
Excellent posts, Faisal!
Nice rat pics, faisel!

The Craftsman are classic "batman" pawl. So named because the pawl looks like the bat signal from the 60's TV show "Batman".




That is certainly a "Super ratchet"!

We saw one here- http://www.papawswrench.com/vboard/index.php?topic=2054.0 (http://www.papawswrench.com/vboard/index.php?topic=2054.0)


thank you for your support gentleman and warm welcome
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: OkieTools on April 18, 2015, 11:32:44 AM
FAISAL nice rats. I really like that SUPERECTOR it is a beast. Great posts man.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: FAISAL on April 18, 2015, 03:06:00 PM
hi everybody

this is a Lane "Unique"  1/2-hex drive ratchet , marked with "Will B. Lane" and "Chicago Ill. U.S.A." forged into the handle, with a "Pat. Jan. 14, 08" patent notice below. The reverse side is marked with "Unique" forged into the handle and the finish is plain steel.

The patent date corresponds to patent #876,680, filed by J.P. Bartholomay in 1907 and issued the following year.

(http://i.imgur.com/uCepCaw.jpg?2)

(http://i.imgur.com/WurxNya.jpg?2)

(http://i.imgur.com/UNc9Ae6.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/IqhXLNP.jpg?2)

(http://i.imgur.com/0WByvA4.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/cYjHa7T.jpg?2)

(http://i.imgur.com/lrJyGPE.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/EJIkzEe.jpg?2)

(http://i.imgur.com/h2i1kMh.jpg?2)

(http://i.imgur.com/VACEns1.jpg?1)

thank you for watching :)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: FAISAL on April 18, 2015, 03:06:49 PM


this is 3/8 -drive P&C 3209 ratchet,the finish is plain steel.

(http://i.imgur.com/NMynP2N.jpg?2)

(http://i.imgur.com/UB2LSYP.jpg?2)

(http://i.imgur.com/pExTA8j.jpg?2)

(http://i.imgur.com/RSR8LA6.jpg?2)

(http://i.imgur.com/5G2Hf5y.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/cj1ULVm.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/L2Fidsp.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/oqVYIBc.jpg?1)


thank you for watching
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: mrchuck on April 19, 2015, 11:18:42 AM
Faisal, Your great photos certainly help others here.
Details are important, and the clarity and magnification you achieve is now to be your standard!
Thank you.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: gibsontool on April 19, 2015, 01:03:56 PM
Real nice pictures, very clear, thanks for the post and welcome from British Columbia Canada.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on April 19, 2015, 01:38:17 PM
That Lane racthet mechanism is bare-bones. And totally out in the open for all to see.

Love the simplicity!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: FAISAL on April 19, 2015, 02:55:08 PM
Faisal, Your great photos certainly help others here.
Details are important, and the clarity and magnification you achieve is now to be your standard!
Thank you.
Real nice pictures, very clear, thanks for the post and welcome from British Columbia Canada.
That Lane racthet mechanism is bare-bones. And totally out in the open for all to see.

Love the simplicity!

thank you gentelmen  :)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: FAISAL on April 19, 2015, 02:58:23 PM
Craftsman 1/2-Drive Ratchet H-Circle model

(http://i.imgur.com/lwEDzrD.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/fHJrKPM.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/xW4METS.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/9wEYGnM.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/E0xlGLg.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/WNp9LcQ.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/UxaWLtw.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/Iv417N6.jpg)

thank you for watching
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: FAISAL on April 19, 2015, 03:09:26 PM

3/8" plomb ratchet 5249
3/8" breaker bar 5265

(http://i.imgur.com/NI1Tsav.jpg?2)

(http://i.imgur.com/Gn8kj3H.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/xeeKpAu.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/qTfrHnW.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/zR4NvCL.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/N4bIb0U.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/iuCJfcc.jpg?4)

(http://i.imgur.com/zOmDXQ2.jpg?4)

(http://i.imgur.com/7xM7hvp.jpg?4)

thank you for watching
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: FAISAL on April 19, 2015, 03:21:34 PM
this is 3/4-drive Williams H-51 reversible ratchet with a forged handle, stamped with the "Williams U.S.A." logo on the reverse face (see middle inset). The shank has forged-in markings for the model number and "Superratchet" trademark on one side, with "J.H. Williams & Co." and the W-Diamond logo on the reverse. Additional markings "Drop Forged" and "Patented" are also forged into the reverse.

The overall length is 19.0 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The patent notice refers to patent #1,957,462, filed by W.C. Kress in 1933 and issued in 1934.

(http://i.imgur.com/0tAfvBs.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/vMPX3uB.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/A9FWckd.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/4VROpHs.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/6ACZhBk.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/jNt7DMK.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/2z8JdL0.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/DGqBuo7.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/GdtkXp7.jpg?1)


thank you for watching


Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: FAISAL on April 19, 2015, 05:01:45 PM
this is a a 1/2-drive Armstrong 20-906 ratchet marked with a forged Strong-Arm logo, and with "Forged in U.S.A." on the reverse.

The overall length is 10.5 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

(http://i.imgur.com/kcIJW08.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/gsXgzfX.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/oNd6y1k.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/YFwishm.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/ou3G748.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/i5mtYym.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/K4liL2s.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/IRmPVU0.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/bBmddSa.jpg)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: OkieTools on April 20, 2015, 08:12:16 AM
God those are nice, that craftsman is so over built I love that. The Plomb, and Armstrong are sweet to. That Williams is a very interesting design.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: FAISAL on April 20, 2015, 02:46:57 PM
God those are nice, that craftsman is so over built I love that. The Plomb, and Armstrong are sweet to. That Williams is a very interesting design.

for me the mechnisim of  williamas ratchet  is best ,really tough!!!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: FAISAL on April 20, 2015, 03:49:51 PM
this is Craftsman "BT" 1/2-drive reversible ratchet, marked with "Drop Forged" forged into the handle, and with "Made in U.S.A." forged into the reverse. The head is stamped with the Craftsman block logo, and the small "BT" manufacturing code is (faintly) visible between the two screws at the bottom of the head.This "BT" ratchet was first listed in the 1936 Sears Spring and Summer catalog as item number 6155

(http://i.imgur.com/YSZFVdW.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/yAhToJ9.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/IsLuZQb.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/wLeTDmv.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/RZXrlBB.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/LQ193tg.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/lNZBwxS.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/UkNrXuq.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/932Osmy.jpg)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: FAISAL on April 20, 2015, 03:54:51 PM
this is Craftsman "K-Circle" 3/4-drive fine-tooth ratchet, stamped with "Pat. No. 2188846" and the Craftsman double-line logo, with a "K-Circle" manufacturer's code at the right.

The overall length is 17.7 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The patent notice cites patent #2,188,846, filed by T. Rueb in 1938 and issued in 1940, with assignment to the Sherman-Klove Company.

The Craftsman double-line logo and chrome-plated finish on this ratchet suggest production in the mid to late 1940s. & SOCKET SET


(http://i.imgur.com/MYstQbA.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/rie3i09.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/ilAAjU6.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/GYU35tA.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/hpZwDH2.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/AAVXu9A.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/53s3h0Y.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/PwIYAvH.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/Fy76iCG.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/EnBs8Ls.jpg)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Nolatoolguy on April 26, 2015, 07:12:46 PM
Great photos, thanks for sharing FAISIL
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on April 26, 2015, 08:52:43 PM
I think you need to buy stock in Super Lube! lol

Awesome pics as usual!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: FAISAL on May 02, 2015, 01:48:55 PM
I think you need to buy stock in Super Lube! lol

Awesome pics as usual!

i have a  lot  LOL :smiley:
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: FAISAL on May 02, 2015, 01:51:11 PM
 Craftsman U Circle 1/2" ,3/8 and 1/4 drive ratchets dating back to approximately 1944-1948. have been made for the war effort of WWII. The U circle would indicate that this ratchet was made by Plomb / Pennens, for Craftsman.

(http://i.imgur.com/QmECgCr.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/pqyTIdO.jpg?2)

(http://i.imgur.com/GulZeWQ.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/lxEaljW.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/NetW9kv.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/Bb11GAN.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/q6EP3jS.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/tqpowWI.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/yylsfgZ.jpg?1)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: FAISAL on May 02, 2015, 01:51:56 PM
craftsman stanless ratchet set , costly but sexy Lol ..cant tell you how they are strong and well made .found it in 1987 catalog

(http://i.imgur.com/LFCWUh5.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/FuQQ2yQ.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/ugER31T.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/i6FcsqJ.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/I4Ndozn.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/9NlfUj7.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/5k5S3Rt.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/JImWcc8.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/QSx7gB6.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/BBXgoFB.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/nU5T5vr.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/H7OUs1T.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/Cn6rbdY.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/KckoHEh.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/3NRDVdX.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/SaXtIIU.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/KdNbOt1.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/EU1YNhC.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/XQKQvY0.jpg?1)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: FAISAL on May 02, 2015, 01:52:38 PM
another rare craftsman vanadium steel ,chromium plated "BE" 3/8" also there is 1/2" and 1/4" as per catalog 1939.the gear mechanism and selector switch is very strong and awesome .i will post the other 1/2" and 1/4" soon .stay tuned  ;)

(http://i.imgur.com/szwMD9E.jpg?1)

(http://i.imgur.com/NyJucwt.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/tdDi8uV.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/iPxW2es.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/HKM3KcC.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/y9GM5Xx.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/ysp4HLT.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/0KnweDW.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/FBoswOI.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/etJ0bZR.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/UVIlgUx.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/7zJocjE.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/CIQl3Og.jpg)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: FAISAL on May 04, 2015, 03:20:21 PM
rare craftsman vanadium steel ,chromium plated "BE" 3/8" also there is 1/4" as per catalog 1935

Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on May 06, 2015, 07:56:30 PM
Dang, FAISAL, those 2 triple plays of Craftsman ratchets are fine indeed! especially the U-circle. outstanding!

I think you have a future in tool restoration. When you get back stateside, you outta advertize. I know alot of guys would love to buy tools done by you.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: FAISAL on May 07, 2015, 02:12:31 PM
Dang, FAISAL, those 2 triple plays of Craftsman ratchets are fine indeed! especially the U-circle. outstanding!

I think you have a future in tool restoration. When you get back stateside, you outta advertize. I know alot of guys would love to buy tools done by you.

that is good project Lol , thank you for your support
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on May 07, 2015, 04:09:34 PM
Dang, FAISAL, those 2 triple plays of Craftsman ratchets are fine indeed! especially the U-circle. outstanding!

I think you have a future in tool restoration. When you get back stateside, you outta advertize. I know alot of guys would love to buy tools done by you.

that is good project Lol , thank you for your support

Shoot man, your work is outstanding!
People ask me to help with their ratchet problems. I'm gonna start referring them to you. Your workmanship puts mine to shame. :grin:
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on June 02, 2015, 08:14:23 AM
New ratchet guts to explore.
Herbrand Van-Chrome 1/2", model S-10.  28 teeth on the drive gear, dual tic-toc pawls with the springs mated to the pawl, not free or in the side of the head as most other designs. Very thick pawls, looks stout.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: mikeswrenches on June 02, 2015, 08:33:24 AM
Faisal,  You have done an outstanding job on cleaning those old rats.  If you don't mind sharing, how are you doing it?  Getting the "grunge" off isn't too much of a problem, but getting rid off the rust stains is.  Well done!

Mike
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: OkieTools on June 02, 2015, 10:04:26 AM
Nice Herbrand ratchet there bonneyman. I like that the springs are apart of the pawls very smart idea.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: OkieTools on June 02, 2015, 10:09:30 AM
I'm with Mike, Faisal I'd like to know too how you get your rats looking so nice. I think we all have an idea on how, and we all have are own way of doing it, but would be interesting to know your process.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: FAISAL on June 03, 2015, 04:50:20 AM
Faisal,  You have done an outstanding job on cleaning those old rats.  If you don't mind sharing, how are you doing it?  Getting the "grunge" off isn't too much of a problem, but getting rid off the rust stains is.  Well done!

Mike
I'm with Mike, Faisal I'd like to know too how you get your rats looking so nice. I think we all have an idea on how, and we all have are own way of doing it, but would be interesting to know your process.

nothing special in my work ,i am using evapo rust with chrome and nickle fish tools but Unfinished tools i am using soft brush wheel to remove the rust 
1-put the tools in paint thinner for one day to remove the old grease and dirt ,then wash them by water and any type of ordinary cleaner like simple green  and wipe them
2-for chrome and nickle finish just keep the tools in evapo rust solution 4 hours or more depend of tools condition and every hour take
the tools out and clean them by plastic brush ,until all the rust is gone
3-When finished, rinse item with water and use wire or plastic brush in the processes
4-Then allow item to air dry buy using any hot air source
5-use TURTLE RUBBING COMPOUND HEAVY DUTY CLEANER TO REMOVES STUBBORN STAINS AND HEAVY OXIDATION TO ACHIEVE A CLEAN, SMOOTH FINISH BY USING SPONGE PAD (MEDIUM GRADE )
6- for the heavy scratched ratchet cover plate you can use sand paper 400,800,1000,1500 in sequence and use polishing compounds by using puffing wheel to remove the scratch and to reach mirror finish or chrome finish
7-Apply light coat of Flitz polish  with soft cloth and  Polish with clean dry cloth
8-and the most important is lots of patience,take your time and Be safe. Don't overload your self by restoring many tools in one time because you you will miss many things

i am going now to restore 3/4" and 1" plomb ratchet and i will use new processes  derusting by electrolysis , i will post the result soon !

thanks
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: OkieTools on June 03, 2015, 02:27:46 PM
FAISAL Nice process. You have a lot more patience than I do, that is for sure, but the proofs in the pics nice ratchet after nice ratchet. Very worth it. Let us know how the electrolysis goes.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: FAISAL on June 03, 2015, 03:24:55 PM
Vintage Craftsman =V= 3/8" Drive Spinner Speeder Ratchet ,just i I've cleaned  and polish the selctor .i have replaced the gear cover plat  retaining ring becuse it broken while removing

(http://i.imgur.com/VdtJhYL.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/sUyf2px.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/XuqBJ38.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/7J8XlFw.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/ydYjP7V.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/0h1yYtZ.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/e0xUFZE.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/6Z3sVwx.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/iGfblk9.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/WQCNNw3.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/f8Qyq98.jpg)

thanks
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: FAISAL on June 03, 2015, 03:27:53 PM
these are Craftsman 1/2 ,3/8 and 1/4 -drive quick-release ratchet with a dual-pawl mechanism, stamped with the "Craftsman" double-line logo on the raised panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and a "-V-" code on the reverse panel.

1/2 length is 10.4 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.
3/8 length is 6.8 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.
1/4 length is 5.2 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.


(http://i.imgur.com/woZDcNN.jpg)
(http://i.imgur.com/8XaEcyL.jpg)
(http://i.imgur.com/WArIAAW.jpg)
(http://i.imgur.com/at09LuU.jpg)
(http://i.imgur.com/kois8kj.jpg)
(http://i.imgur.com/mmcR62C.jpg)
(http://i.imgur.com/4J8CCEL.jpg)
(http://i.imgur.com/42qj9Q5.jpg)
(http://i.imgur.com/ZarLPLm.jpg)
(http://i.imgur.com/65T3sSh.jpg)
(http://i.imgur.com/bq8DSuT.jpg)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: FAISAL on June 03, 2015, 03:36:24 PM
this is 1/2-drive Snap-on 71-N ratchet KENOSHA WIS , with "Snap-on U.S.A." in raised letters forged into the shank, and with "Patent No 1854513" forged into the reverse.

The overall length is 9.5 inches, and the finish is polished chrome

(http://i.imgur.com/cZWy7PW.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/31I2bXK.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/kRtsv9H.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/Di9ojBS.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/VWn0u38.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/PNdjvBF.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/NBJvyJP.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/jmR1EEm.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/rme36rz.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/4rHmWTk.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/YnRE9bn.jpg)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: OkieTools on June 03, 2015, 10:29:53 PM
That Craftsman Spinner Speeder Ratchet is so cool, never seen one before. The Snap-on looks really nice after clean up. Good job.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: turnnut on June 04, 2015, 09:09:19 AM
FAISAL, thank you for posting your method of cleaning vintage tools, very interesting information.

everyone has their own method, but as you point out, patience is very critical to doing a good job.

I am also a fan of Evapo-Rust.  for stubborn tools like adjustable wrenches, I like to spray them
with Gibbs, and let set for a few days.

again, thank you, Frank from Massachusetts.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: OkieTools on June 05, 2015, 05:55:50 AM
Got another ratchet video for all of you, it's my Fathers Day gift from my wife and son. A Proto 3/4 Drive 5649BL ratchet. Hope you all enjoy.
(http://i1343.photobucket.com/albums/o795/yustinus1973/IMG_1968-1_zpszmzcaev3.jpg) (http://s1343.photobucket.com/user/yustinus1973/media/IMG_1968-1_zpszmzcaev3.jpg.html)
https://youtu.be/QC_vThf53TI
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: FAISAL on June 05, 2015, 05:57:52 AM
FAISAL, thank you for posting your method of cleaning vintage tools, very interesting information.

everyone has their own method, but as you point out, patience is very critical to doing a good job.

I am also a fan of Evapo-Rust.  for stubborn tools like adjustable wrenches, I like to spray them
with Gibbs, and let set for a few days.

again, thank you, Frank from Massachusetts.

you are most welcome
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: FAISAL on June 05, 2015, 06:01:55 AM
Got another ratchet video for all of you, it's my Fathers Day gift from my wife and son. A Proto 3/4 Drive 5649BL ratchet. Hope you all enjoy.

nice and useful video,thanks for sharing
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: OkieTools on June 05, 2015, 08:27:41 AM
FAISAL, your welcome sir.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on June 28, 2015, 03:58:14 PM
Someone from GG sent a Bonney 1/4" gear assembly with a lazy pawl. Figured I should put one of the pics in here so you could see the parts in the Bonney dual pawl set-up.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: lauver on July 23, 2015, 10:37:57 AM
bman,

Great work... yu da man!

I'm curious how and what you used to squeeze the two pins together to extract the selector disk/central shaft out.  Also, who supplied the 3rd or 4th hand to pry the selector disk up? 

In a 3/8" or 1/2" version of this ratchet it would be no problem because there is plenty of room to work, but in the 1/4" ratchet the amount of space behind the pawls is very tight.

Gang,

Just so you all understand the trouble that bonneyman went to in fixing this ratchet, the term "lazy pawl" means that this ratchet was only firing on one of two cylinders.  Or, put another way, this 72 tooth hot rod ratchet was reduced to a common 36 tooth action clunker ratchet.  This was a very slick patented design that beat many other ratchet makers like MDF to the punch with their RHFT ratchet that was not introduced until 1970.

In helping me, bonneyman saved two very nice and somewhat rare vintage Bonney ratchets. Thanks again bman!!!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on July 23, 2015, 12:34:46 PM
Wanting me to share my trade secrets, eh? :smiley:

LOL

I put a small standard screwdriver in my vise, and locked it in in a horizontal position facing away from the bench. (I then positioned it between the selector knob and gear body).
I then took too smaller screwdrivers, and pushed in both pawls pins. Simultaneously, I leaned on the assembly so the driver prying off the selector knob put pressure on it to separate the parts while I fiddled with the pawl pins. When both pins were pushed in enough to slide into the hole, the pressure on the vise driver separated the parts. I then stopped, and slowly pulled the selector out the rest of the way by hand, being careful to catch both pawl pins as they shot out once they got past the outer end of the body.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: oldtools on July 23, 2015, 04:46:55 PM
WOW!!  was it difficult to reassemble?.. 
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on July 23, 2015, 08:16:37 PM
WOW!!  was it difficult to reassemble?..

No. You have to have the pawl pins horizontal, in as far as they will go easily, then apply light pressure on the selector knob in. The pawl pins will "bind" up against the body, which allows you to free a hand and push them both in with fine needle nose pliers. Once they are pushed in far enough to slide into the body hole, the whole assembly pops in.

I've got a line on a 3/8" Bonney -702K rat that has a lazy pawl. Still trying to finangle the deal.
Title: Thorsen 3/8" open gear 77J4
Post by: bonneyman on August 09, 2015, 01:32:12 PM
Had to take apart my new to me Thorsen to repair the spring and clean up the pawl teeth. Got some help from a GG member, and managed to get it apart. Here's the guts.
Title: Stanley/Challenger 1/4" RHFT
Post by: bonneyman on August 18, 2015, 04:08:29 PM
Picked up a 1060A during my travels. Since I'm a bit light on 1/4"ers figured it was worth the $2.
Dual see-saw pawls, offset in the gear assembly so they don't run in the exact same tooth channel in the head. Probably helps disperse the wear a bit. 45 teeth, very smooth action, short round knurled handle just like I like.
Here it is next to an EASCO RHFT for comparison (with a similar dual pawl set-up, also used in the Craftsman version).
Title: Crescent LT70
Post by: bonneyman on September 02, 2015, 05:19:49 PM
A new-to-me 3/8" drive roundhead ratchet made by Crescent. It has two pawls, which I'm calling "stair stepper" pawls, because they have this upright shape like a stair stepper machine.
They are retracted and extended into working position by a cammed cutout in the cast selector knob, which appears to be the shortcoming of the design. A bit weak due to the thin cast metal, it tends to fail by cracking.
As I repair the one I have I'll get teeth counts and more data. But here's some pics.
Seems originally to be a Wright patent.  https://patents.google.com/patent/US2715955A/en
Later patented by Crescent Niagara Tools  https://patents.google.com/patent/US2982161

It seems that S-K had a similar design as well: https://patents.google.com/patent/US2744432A/en
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: OkieTools on October 11, 2015, 05:35:24 PM
As I told Bonneyman, when I got the videos on my new to me Easco RHFT ratchets done I'd post them here. Should go nice with his post from last month. In it I talk a lot about how to take them apart, and some of the ticks I use to get them back together. Hope you guys enjoy.

(http://i1343.photobucket.com/albums/o795/yustinus1973/IMG_2589_zps7nh9hj4j.jpg) (http://s1343.photobucket.com/user/yustinus1973/media/IMG_2589_zps7nh9hj4j.jpg.html)

https://youtu.be/15SyIaLB98s
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: OkieTools on October 11, 2015, 05:45:28 PM
Also wanted to post a video I did on the Plomb Wright Field WF-21 3/8 ratchet Chilly sent me.

(http://i1343.photobucket.com/albums/o795/yustinus1973/IMG_2582-2_zpsogzefjrl.jpg) (http://s1343.photobucket.com/user/yustinus1973/media/IMG_2582-2_zpsogzefjrl.jpg.html)

https://youtu.be/6dohMEWWdPI
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Twertsy on October 12, 2015, 06:10:52 AM
Based on the categories on the first page of this thread, how the heck would you folks "bin" this mechanism from the Wright No. 50?
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on October 12, 2015, 12:27:30 PM
Based on the categories on the first page of this thread, how the heck would you folks "bin" this mechanism from the Wright No. 50?

I think your working title of "piston pawl" works well.

Not the finest action in the world, but looks dang near bulletproof. And the pawls and springs could be DIY made if one broke.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on November 16, 2015, 08:32:38 AM
Well, we're less than 200 views from 40,000. Imagine that? 4 1/2 years and 40,000 peeks. That's roughly 10,000 views a year.
Amazing that the thread has proven so popular.

I'm grateful that it has proven so helpful.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Twertsy on November 16, 2015, 08:55:57 AM
Well, we're less than 200 views from 40,000. Imagine that? 4 1/2 years and 40,000 peeks. That's roughly 10,000 views a year.
Amazing that the thread has proven so popular.

I'm grateful that it has proven so helpful.

No surprise to me George, great idea for a truly helpful thread!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: JackieB on November 19, 2015, 10:46:27 AM
this is  Williams No, E1-24 THE SUPERECTOR 1" square Ratchet Wrench 25" Length ,the gear is really big and the sound of the ratchet is horrible ..LOL

still i don't know when its manufactured ,any idea?

I have done a small amount of research on the net and found a couple "claims" about J.H. Williams that puts their move to Buffalo around 1914.  Please, this is just what I found on the net so it should be taken with a large softener salt nugget.  I've also found dates of the move around 1923.  I too am interested in finding out the age of my ratchet, an E2 48, yeah, 48" long with a 2½" hex socket.  Assembled it tips the scale at 33 pounds.

After checking out the socket, a one piece forging socket and cog, I can't imagine what they would cost today.  I work at a forge job shop in maintenance, I know what it would take to forge and machine this piece and it wouldn't be cheap.

Nice job of cleaning it up.  I'll get some glamour shot taken and upload them later this evening.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on November 19, 2015, 03:47:37 PM
Welcome, JackieB!

We would certainly like to spy the inner workings of that ratchet.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Papaw on November 19, 2015, 04:58:07 PM
Here is the picture from the original thread-
(http://www.papawswrench.com/vboard/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=18434.0;attach=40195;image)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on November 20, 2015, 08:30:54 AM
Here is the picture from the original thread-
(http://www.papawswrench.com/vboard/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=18434.0;attach=40195;image)

Hmmm, that's a big one! See-Saw pawl from the look of it. Selector knob must be removed, then the pawl, pawl spring, and ball should come out of the top there. I doubt that 1" drive gear teeth are worn badly, just clean and lube and reassemble.

Update: Guess I was wrong. Looks like it's got 4 separate tic-toc pawls that engage and disengage in sequence to get it to ratchet. Yikes!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bill300d on November 20, 2015, 10:47:05 AM
I knew that someone had done one of these before
http://www.papawswrench.com/vboard/index.php?topic=128.msg102425;topicseen#msg102425 (http://www.papawswrench.com/vboard/index.php?topic=128.msg102425;topicseen#msg102425)
and johnsironsantuary a little further down the page refers to a catalog page he posted in another thread.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: JackieB on November 23, 2015, 01:29:06 PM
Here are a few pics of the clean-up this weekend.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: JackieB on November 23, 2015, 01:38:50 PM
Somebody stop me...
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: JackieB on November 23, 2015, 02:16:16 PM
Please...
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: JackieB on November 23, 2015, 02:20:57 PM
And...
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: JackieB on November 23, 2015, 02:23:16 PM
And finally for effect.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on December 05, 2015, 03:52:18 PM
I didn't know AR's had so many pawls! lol

Nice photo.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: JackieB on December 06, 2015, 08:13:20 PM
Legal AR's (like the one in the picture) have what, two?  Others have more depending on the fire selection.  The AR was for scale.  I figured a quarter wouldn't work well with this ratchet.  :cheesy:
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: mrchuck on December 07, 2015, 09:53:50 AM
I've got my big 1" drive Snap-On standing on it's 4 foot handle next to the door. As I pass by it I turn the drive 1 or 2 clicks.
Haven't had to use it yet.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: JackieB on December 07, 2015, 12:58:42 PM
The only use this old JH Williams Superector will see will be if I get a call that somebody has a bolt with a 2.375" hex that they can't turn.  Then someone will need to give you a call to hold the other end.  Other than that it's a 33 pound hammer that I don't want to swing more than once.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Twertsy on December 08, 2015, 06:11:08 AM
All, would appreciate some eyes on this ratchet.  No guts yet but I'll be back from Omaha on Thursday and will get some pics of the innards.  We're thinking Bog/Cragin made for Plomb suring WWII.  Any other thoughts?  Mech and selector kinda look Williams also??

http://toolarchives.com/node/1657
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on December 08, 2015, 09:26:12 AM
Looks nice whatever it is.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Twertsy on February 07, 2016, 04:11:34 PM
Anyone ever seen this one?  Penens 1661 with a batman pawl!

http://toolarchives.com/node/2334
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: mrchuck on February 08, 2016, 09:05:22 AM
I have several of these ratchets. What makes them rare??
Just age I guess.
They are very heavy, like a hammer.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Twertsy on February 08, 2016, 01:54:03 PM
I have several of these ratchets. What makes them rare??
Just age I guess.
They are very heavy, like a hammer.

I have tons of them, but not a single one that has this mechanism (batman pawl).  Mine are all tic-toc.............that's what makes this one special.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on February 08, 2016, 06:55:17 PM
I have several of these ratchets. What makes them rare??
Just age I guess.
They are very heavy, like a hammer.

I have tons of them, but not a single one that has this mechanism (batman pawl).  Mine are all tic-toc.............that's what makes this one special.

How's the back drag compared to the tic-toc Penen's version?
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Twertsy on February 09, 2016, 02:24:51 AM
I have several of these ratchets. What makes them rare??
Just age I guess.
They are very heavy, like a hammer.

I have tons of them, but not a single one that has this mechanism (batman pawl).  Mine are all tic-toc.............that's what makes this one special.

How's the back drag compared to the tic-toc Penen's version?

I don't know George.  Local Plomb collector I do a lot of trading with sent me the pics.  Hoping he'll give it up in trade during his next visit to my shop.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: zphenx86t on February 10, 2016, 11:09:42 AM
Are there replacement gears available or interchangeable for the Indestro 6272 3/8" ratchet. I have a nice one but a couple teeth are gone. Any help would be appreciated
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on March 27, 2016, 09:38:43 PM
Are there replacement gears available or interchangeable for the Indestro 6272 3/8" ratchet. I have a nice one but a couple teeth are gone. Any help would be appreciated

Though I have seen a kit or two on ebay, really the only option is finding a donor rat with a bad handle and swap out the gear assembly.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on June 03, 2016, 08:24:38 PM
Looks like we're zeroing in on 50,000 views for this thread. Cool biz - and thanks for looking! :grin:
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Northwoods on June 06, 2016, 07:02:32 AM
Don't see my Superratchet B-52 here. I understand they are rather unusual. Can one of you guys show us how they work?
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on June 06, 2016, 08:14:58 PM
Don't see my Superratchet B-52 here. I understand they are rather unusual. Can one of you guys show us how they work?

Post a pic of yours and we'll see what we can do.

P.S. Found the pic in your other thread. Looks like the tri-wing selector comes off with the center machine screw, then the flat cover unscrews by tapping it off using the three holes. If you had an adjustable spanner tool with small enough pins it might be easier. Also soak it in JAFE juice for a week just to loosen things up first.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Papaw on June 06, 2016, 09:32:26 PM
Some new members may not know about JAFE Juice. Jafe- a member here and on several other forums touts it as his special blend. It might be best shown by reading this- http://www.thegaragegazette.com/index.php?topic=17509.0 (http://www.thegaragegazette.com/index.php?topic=17509.0)
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Northwoods on June 06, 2016, 10:11:27 PM
Don't see my Superratchet B-52 here. I understand they are rather unusual. Can one of you guys show us how they work?

Post a pic of yours and we'll see what we can do.

P.S. Found the pic in your other thread. Looks like the tri-wing selector comes off with the center machine screw, then the flat cover unscrews by tapping it off using the three holes. If you had an adjustable spanner tool with small enough pins it might be easier. Also soak it in JAFE juice for a week just to loosen things up first.

Sorry.  I should have mentioned that mine does not have the screw. Mine is second generation.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: RedVise on August 13, 2016, 02:22:24 PM
Help !!  Searched the thread, might have missed it, but anyone familiar with this Billings ?

Seems like it must disassemble via the hole at the top , right ?
If so, I am going to have to soak it for a while, it is not moving at all.
Seems not to have been touched in a long time.

 Brian

Pics are not great but you get the idea.   and Win 10 is lousy...
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on August 13, 2016, 08:17:12 PM
RedVise, me thinks (big SWAG here) that your ratchet has a water wheel type of gear system. That little flat bump on the one side of the head is right where an external set screw would normally be with a spring and pin behind it. Maybe you could snake a thin piece of spring steel down through the hole in the top and prevent the pin from popping into a gear groove and then it might slide out?

Sort of like this:
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: RedVise on August 13, 2016, 08:55:46 PM
Yep, looks very similar, but there is not  a externally accessed  set screw, or opening at all.
So (my SWAG) is that there is a spring and pin, but they are loaded from the center, and the ratchet mechanism is then  inserted in the center  and a set screw is used from the top (somehow). Ta Da !!

No patent number to use either...



Brian
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: kwoswalt99 on August 14, 2016, 06:30:13 PM
I see no gearless models here... I want to know how the Cornwell gearless works!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: RedVise on August 18, 2016, 06:34:36 AM
. Maybe you could snake a thin piece of spring steel down through the hole in the top and prevent the pin from popping into a gear groove and then it might slide out?

I have got the ratchet mechanism freed up, who hoo 10teeth !!
Have tried depressing the pin, no success.
Will keep shooting the lube to it and trying to push done on the pin.

Brian
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: kwoswalt99 on June 14, 2017, 06:56:56 PM
....
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Twertsy on June 21, 2017, 01:31:10 AM
....

"Technically" not gearless.  I believe I counted ~250 or so clicks in mine.  I haven't had the cajones to try and use it in a hi-torque situation yet.........wonder how strong it is?
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: kwoswalt99 on June 21, 2017, 06:36:18 PM
....

"Technically" not gearless.  I believe I counted ~250 or so clicks in mine.  I haven't had the cajones to try and use it in a hi-torque situation yet.........wonder how strong it is?

Mine is not very strong at all, but it's worn out though.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on June 28, 2017, 08:18:32 PM
Cool!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: smokey on August 23, 2017, 01:19:23 PM
Hi all,
I have two older ratchets that I would like to fix. Do any of you have for sale or know where I could buy repair kits for a New Britain 54 3/8drive flexi head ratchet and another repair kit for a MAC XR8-P ratchet. If anyone has these for sale could you please quote the price including shipping to Malta? I have already contacted MAC in Europe and they do not a repair kit for this ratchet anymore. Thanks in advance.
Glen
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Twertsy on October 10, 2017, 05:24:30 AM
....

"Technically" not gearless.  I believe I counted ~250 or so clicks in mine.  I haven't had the cajones to try and use it in a hi-torque situation yet.........wonder how strong it is?

Mine is not very strong at all, but it's worn out though.
I'm betting most are worn out.  I have 3/8, 1/2 and 3/4 drive versions and I'd really like to try them but I'm a bit leery of either breaking the ratchet or my hand.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on November 29, 2017, 08:05:46 PM
You know, kwos, the more I look at your ratchet internals the more I see coaster brake parts on a bicycle rear hub. Forward = spins free. Back pedal = a set of tangs push the brake wedges out and rub on the inside of the hub.
Since yours are worn (and thus slipping under load), I'm wondering if you couldn't arc weld some small blobs onto the outer edge of those parts and then grind them smooth - but not totally down to the original steel. That extra couple thousandths of a inch my be enough to fully lock it when used. Maybe? IDK
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bill300d on November 29, 2017, 08:35:50 PM
How about cutting some slight groves across those wedges with a file so they bite better.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Northwoods on September 12, 2018, 06:42:00 AM
Anyone over here (Bonneyman  ==  Twertsy) know anything about this wards ratchet?  Who made it for Wards and when?
d42jeep traded one to Twertsy some time back.


http://www.papawswrench.com/vboard/index.php?topic=23923.msg137422#msg137422

Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Twertsy on November 13, 2018, 01:35:46 AM
Anyone over here (Bonneyman  ==  Twertsy) know anything about this wards ratchet?  Who made it for Wards and when?
d42jeep traded one to Twertsy some time back.


http://www.papawswrench.com/vboard/index.php?topic=23923.msg137422#msg137422


Apologies for the massive delay!  I believe it's Truth if I recall.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on November 13, 2018, 08:32:47 AM
Yeah, sorry about the delay. Been real busy with too many projects and honey-do items.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: d42jeep on November 13, 2018, 01:09:10 PM
Here are all the pictures I have left of that set and ratchet. The sockets were a mix of Ward Master and Truth but looked very similar except for the markings.
-Don
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: lauver on December 03, 2018, 07:22:15 PM
Gang,

I recently acquired a nice little Fleet 1260-1, 3/8-drive round head ratchet that may be of interest to some of you.  It has a 45-tooth ring gear and a single see-saw pawl in the ratchet core.  This ratchet was made and sold between ~ mid-1950's and mid-1960's.

Here's a few photo's:

Assembled complete,

(https://i366.photobucket.com/albums/oo109/lauver_photos/Fleet%201260-1%20Ratchet3_zpsbhc6wjoc.jpg) (https://s366.photobucket.com/user/lauver_photos/media/Fleet%201260-1%20Ratchet3_zpsbhc6wjoc.jpg.html)

Ratchet core and components disassembled,
(http://i366.photobucket.com/albums/oo109/lauver_photos/Fleet%201260-1%20Ratchet2_zpsqw8humub.jpg) (http://s366.photobucket.com/user/lauver_photos/media/Fleet%201260-1%20Ratchet2_zpsqw8humub.jpg.html)

Ratchet core & body disassembled,
(https://i366.photobucket.com/albums/oo109/lauver_photos/Fleet%201260-1%20Ratchet1_zpsxki7bbrg.jpg) (https://s366.photobucket.com/user/lauver_photos/media/Fleet%201260-1%20Ratchet1_zpsxki7bbrg.jpg.html)

Let me know if you have any questions or comments.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: d42jeep on December 10, 2018, 06:24:10 AM
I had picked up a S-K 1/2” drive ratchet with a broken drive side at an estate sale a couple of weeks ago. My tool collecting buddy Jason told me that if I emailed S-K customer service and gave them the part number they would send a free repair kit and that is exactly what happened. Here are a few before and after pictures.
-Don
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on March 04, 2019, 08:46:25 AM
Have had this ratchet awhile but didn't take it apart for pics till last weekend.

A JET 3/8" fine tooth. Comfy handle for a polished hourglass-style, 60 teeth, sliding pawl. Think FACOM, S-K TUFF 1, or the newer Asian Craftsman tri-wing round head.
Selector switch is a knurled ring on the back. Not the easiest to flip, but on the other hand it wouldn't be easy to accidentally reverse it. Actually like this ratchet as it has a very small gear head. Might find a use in tight restricted areas.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on March 04, 2019, 08:50:04 AM
I had picked up a S-K 1/2” drive ratchet with a broken drive side at an estate sale a couple of weeks ago. My tool collecting buddy Jason told me that if I emailed S-K customer service and gave them the part number they would send a free repair kit and that is exactly what happened. Here are a few before and after pictures.
-Don

Your middle picture shows the difference of construction with the drive gears perfectly, Don.   :smiley:
The older one is totally disassembleable - the new one is not. About the only advantage is if someone is selling the vintage tool and you find the newer style drive gear in it you can tell right off.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Northwoods on March 04, 2019, 04:41:13 PM
these are Craftsman 1/2,3/8 and 1/4-drive ratchets with a "V"-shaped shifter, stamped with the "Craftsman" double-line logo on the raised panel, with "Forged in U.S.A." and a "V" code on the reverse panel.

1/2" overall length is 10.3 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.
3/8" overall length is 6.8 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.
1/4" overall length is 5.2 inches, and the finish is chrome plating.

The ratchet head is fitted with an oil hole closed by a steel ball
Although not marked with a patent notice, the design of the V-shaped shifter is described by patent #D185,651, issued to R.M. Vose in 1959 with assignment to Moore Drop Forging.


(http://i.imgur.com/Yiv5iWR.jpg)
(http://i.imgur.com/TtaUgPJ.jpg)


At least the PO didn't store the big boy rat in a water bucket, but he certainly did not KEEP RATCHET WELL OILED.

(http://i.imgur.com/kacEkAP.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/DoFEsRb.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/wwSfLQC.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/iAmt3ah.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/Kqp7Scv.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/bhfFKaE.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/o0pcpml.jpg)

thank you for watching
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on March 05, 2019, 05:02:31 PM
Nice triple play!  :grin:
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: lptools on March 05, 2019, 05:22:43 PM
Wow!!! Nice tools, and great job of cleaning them up!! Regards, Lou
Title: Kobalt "gearless" ratchet
Post by: bonneyman on April 30, 2019, 04:40:12 PM
First new ratchet in awhile. A Kobalt "gearless" racthet in 3/8". Typical Taiwanese-handle, very big round head - even bigger than the Bonney (which I thought was massive!)

Still trying to figure how this thing functions. Apparently when torque is applied in the desired direction the hex shape of the center drive pushed the 6 roller bearing out, producing an interference fit which "jams" the mechanism for movement. Releasing the torque allows the rollers to retract back into the inner ring, allowing for freewheel. How the direction changing knob switches the inner mechanism remains a mystery. Very smooth, seems like it would take high forces easily. Plus it's quick release!
About the only down side is the placement of the two retainer flat coil springs. they are not interchangeable. Apparently the mechanism requires a certain amount of free-play to operate, and the flat springs appear to be different thicknesses. Switching them messes up the fine play adjustment. As does too much light grease.  :shocked:

So if you need a ratchet with minimal arc swing (and the big head isn't an issue) I'd say this tool would work.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Northwoods on April 30, 2019, 05:46:19 PM
Bog did it 90 years ago--with only four roller bearings.  Those clever Americans!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on May 04, 2019, 04:07:40 PM
Gang,

I recently acquired a nice little Fleet 1260-1, 3/8-drive round head ratchet that may be of interest to some of you.  It has a 45-tooth ring gear and a single see-saw pawl in the ratchet core.  This ratchet was made and sold between ~ mid-1950's and mid-1960's.

Here's a few photo's:

Assembled complete,

(https://i366.photobucket.com/albums/oo109/lauver_photos/Fleet%201260-1%20Ratchet3_zpsbhc6wjoc.jpg) (https://s366.photobucket.com/user/lauver_photos/media/Fleet%201260-1%20Ratchet3_zpsbhc6wjoc.jpg.html)

Ratchet core and components disassembled,
(http://i366.photobucket.com/albums/oo109/lauver_photos/Fleet%201260-1%20Ratchet2_zpsqw8humub.jpg) (http://s366.photobucket.com/user/lauver_photos/media/Fleet%201260-1%20Ratchet2_zpsqw8humub.jpg.html)

Ratchet core & body disassembled,
(https://i366.photobucket.com/albums/oo109/lauver_photos/Fleet%201260-1%20Ratchet1_zpsxki7bbrg.jpg) (https://s366.photobucket.com/user/lauver_photos/media/Fleet%201260-1%20Ratchet1_zpsxki7bbrg.jpg.html)

Let me know if you have any questions or comments.

Just found a TruTest 1/4" with the fork selector/roll pin pawl. Not the smoothest mechanism out there but usable.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Flotsam on August 01, 2019, 06:54:39 PM
Gang,

I recently acquired a nice little Fleet 1260-1, 3/8-drive round head ratchet that may be of interest to some of you.  It has a 45-tooth ring gear and a single see-saw pawl in the ratchet core.  This ratchet was made and sold between ~ mid-1950's and mid-1960's.

Here's a few photo's:

Assembled complete,

(https://i366.photobucket.com/albums/oo109/lauver_photos/Fleet%201260-1%20Ratchet3_zpsbhc6wjoc.jpg) (https://s366.photobucket.com/user/lauver_photos/media/Fleet%201260-1%20Ratchet3_zpsbhc6wjoc.jpg.html)

Ratchet core and components disassembled,
(http://i366.photobucket.com/albums/oo109/lauver_photos/Fleet%201260-1%20Ratchet2_zpsqw8humub.jpg) (http://s366.photobucket.com/user/lauver_photos/media/Fleet%201260-1%20Ratchet2_zpsqw8humub.jpg.html)

Ratchet core & body disassembled,
(https://i366.photobucket.com/albums/oo109/lauver_photos/Fleet%201260-1%20Ratchet1_zpsxki7bbrg.jpg) (https://s366.photobucket.com/user/lauver_photos/media/Fleet%201260-1%20Ratchet1_zpsxki7bbrg.jpg.html)

Let me know if you have any questions or comments.

This is very interesting.   I recently acquired a Tru-Test T1060-1.   the  1/4 in equivalent made by  Proto Challenger.   I have managed to take the ratchet apart by removing the retaining ring. 

 So my ratchet  is missing  the spring and does not work.  No i know i didn't lose it.   There was no spring action within the ratchet prior to taking it apart.     So I am trying to find a spring of the correct size  and also find out where that spring goes?     Any help you can provide would be appreciated.     I really would like to fix it by finding a spring rather than the whole ratchet capsule.

thanks in advance.

Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Papaw on August 01, 2019, 07:11:25 PM
Try springs from Bic lighters, or ball point pens.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Flotsam on August 01, 2019, 07:31:51 PM
Thanks I will try a spring from there.  My question is where does the spring go?

From looking at it, it is not apparent where the spring would sit
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on August 04, 2019, 02:27:34 PM
Thanks I will try a spring from there.  My question is where does the spring go?

From looking at it, it is not apparent where the spring would sit

If I recall correctly, it's a "floating" spring. It's not really held in but where it's at it can't really go anywhere, and lends it's spring tension to keeping things where you set it - by tension only. If need be I can take my little Tru-Test apart and try to get better pics.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Flotsam on August 04, 2019, 03:49:31 PM
wow  thank you.    My only guess is that its in the area  behind  the pawl.    I got mine apart   but  guessing the sequence for reassembly is   
1.  pin that the  pawl rotates around
2.  Direction selector  (but there must be some trick to it)
It seems like selector must be installed while pawl is completely in wrong  direction and then must be rotated in.
3.  So the spring seems like it must be behind pawl when it is in the right direction
4. Drop ratchet "capsule"  back in  w spacer on one side
5.  Put back the retaining spring

Correct me if you think i have this wrong
I need to get the appropriate grease for this.

thanks again
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on August 04, 2019, 08:39:30 PM
I'd use SuperLube synthetic grease in there. Don't go hogwild with it, though.

Let me pop my 1/4" drive Tru-Test rat apart tomorrow and refamiliarize myself with it.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Flotsam on August 05, 2019, 03:29:21 AM
thanks that would be most appreciated
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on August 13, 2019, 04:14:35 PM
Gang,

I recently acquired a nice little Fleet 1260-1, 3/8-drive round head ratchet that may be of interest to some of you.  It has a 45-tooth ring gear and a single see-saw pawl in the ratchet core.  This ratchet was made and sold between ~ mid-1950's and mid-1960's.


Ratchet core and components disassembled,
(http://i366.photobucket.com/albums/oo109/lauver_photos/Fleet%201260-1%20Ratchet2_zpsqw8humub.jpg) (http://s366.photobucket.com/user/lauver_photos/media/Fleet%201260-1%20Ratchet2_zpsqw8humub.jpg.html)



The pin on the side of the pawl goes into the slot of the direction knob. The spring goes in that slot, underneath the pin.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on August 17, 2019, 09:47:01 AM
A new-to-me ratchet. 1/4" no brand. Just Chromium-Vanadium Japan. Normally I just breeze past these foreign jobbies, but this one had a fairly small head yet large for a quarter drive crisp knurled handle. It turned, so handed over a $1 for it.
disassembled and cleaned/lubed. 41 teeth, single see-saw mechanism. Reminiscent of an S-K. (Think I recall Japan copied an S-K design or two).
Anyway, the head is not quite as compact as the MATCO comfort handle but the knurled handle is longer and thicker than most I have. Fits nicly in the hand, nice selector design, too!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on December 02, 2019, 03:09:59 PM
Snagged a Powkraft 3/8"er today. Frozen solid with hard black gunk, but some elbow grease and acetone cleaned it up.
41 teeth, single see-saw pawl design (Similar to the S-K round head).  But with a flat coiled spring retainer like the Thorsen round head.
These have a strong following: I can see why - nice and compact head and handle with comfy polymer grip.

https://patents.google.com/patent/USD199149
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: d42jeep on December 02, 2019, 03:41:28 PM
Nice job. I find the selector on these kind of unusual.
-Don
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on December 03, 2019, 01:24:17 PM
Another ratchet today: Older Williams B-52
Dual see-saw pawls similar to what Bonney did with their -xxxK ratchets in the 60's. Very fine and light action, dual pawls effectively double the tooth count without sacrificing strength (I think S-K finally read the tea leaves with this and incorporated it into their new 90 tooth DT kits).
https://patents.google.com/patent/US2772763
The handle shape is unmistakeable - it has a round knurled handle but the steel flattens and widens as it nears the head which has got to increase the overall strength. So, it's the best of both worlds in my book. I have a 1/2"er that I'm trying to get working - this 3/8" will be a welcome addition to the mix of tools I own.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on December 07, 2019, 02:30:42 PM
One of the ergonomic comfort grip MATCO ratchets. After the wife saw a pic of a triple play of these, she said the handles looked like coke soda bottles. So that is their name for me now: the MATCO coke bottle handles!

Single see-saw pawl, 45 teeth head. Normally don't like smooth ratchets (the EASCO branded ergo rats are a rare exception), but the shape of this one - though ergo and full polish - tends to get larger toward the end. Making it less likely to let your hand slide off. Very small diameter head, handle is not as short as other 1/4"ers. Thus it's a good balance for me. Small where it needs to be, not so small elsewhere. Would love to get a full family of these.
P.S. I guess Wright still offers the style even though MATCO doesn't.

I've included a pic of the MATCO next to the EASCO ergo to show the differences and advantages.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on December 07, 2019, 02:44:54 PM
Another ratchet I snagged a few months ago and apparently never posted pics.
A Wright open gear in 1/2".  Different form the other popular open gear ratchet (Thorsen) in that the Wright has a ergo handle, and all one has to do to remove the gear in undo an allen screw buried in the gear. No pin punching required. Though there's no gear cover and it is dimensionally larger than the Thorsen. Overall it's very nice!
Pictured next to a Thorsen for comparison.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on December 07, 2019, 02:59:41 PM
I decided to update the thread with some pertinent info.

Whenever possible, I've included the patent for the design. This will be an on-going process as there's lots of research and looking up to do. I hope that helps explain and show the details.

If anyone knows of or finds a patent not listed, PM me and I'll find the documentation and post it in the appropriate place. Thanks!
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: lptools on December 07, 2019, 03:54:48 PM
Hello, bonneyman. Thanks for posting!! I have always liked the look of the open gear ratchets. Didn't Indestro have a similar design? How about we rename your post "Inside a rat-chat"  :grin:
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on December 07, 2019, 04:06:33 PM
Hello, bonneyman. Thanks for posting!! I have always liked the look of the open gear ratchets. Didn't Indestro have a similar design? How about we rename your post "Inside a rat-chat"  :grin:

I do believe Duro/Indestro had an open gear design. Sadly, none have crossed my work bench, so, I can't say anything about them.

Rat-chat - lol
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: lptools on December 07, 2019, 04:20:06 PM
Hello. bonneyman. I must have been thinking of these . The 2 at top are Indestro Select 6470, the one at the very top is missing the cover, my mistake. The one at bottom is a 3250 Indestro Super. All 3 are 1/2" drive. Regards, Lou
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on December 07, 2019, 09:14:59 PM
I have a nice pair of Duro rats that I'm sure are tic-toc pawls. The patent number is on the handle, and both the 1/4" female and 3/8" female ratchet bodies are the same - only the drive gear is different. Bulletproof design, occasional oiling and these rats last forever - and it's verifiable as so many of these great old tools are still out there!

http://www.datamp.org/patents/search/advance.php?pn=1902878&id=10709&set=438
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on December 07, 2019, 09:20:30 PM
Somebody stop me...

I think I found the patent for this beast: http://www.datamp.org/patents/search/advance.php?pn=2097594&id=28136&set=92
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on December 08, 2019, 02:51:39 PM
Hello. bonneyman. I must have been thinking of these . The 2 at top are Indestro Select 6470, the one at the very top is missing the cover, my mistake. The one at bottom is a 3250 Indestro Super. All 3 are 1/2" drive. Regards, Lou

Yes Lou, those are the Indestro open gears I've seen. I think the terms "Select" and "Super" are indicative of different eras of manufacture.
How is the handle feel when you apply alot of force? Doesn't seem to ergonomic.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: lptools on December 08, 2019, 05:26:28 PM
Hello, Bonneyman. i have never used these!!! The end of the handle is a good fit for my hand, I will have to try one out. Regards, Lou
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: bonneyman on December 09, 2019, 07:57:14 AM
Hello, Bonneyman. i have never used these!!! The end of the handle is a good fit for my hand, I will have to try one out. Regards, Lou

Lou, they are bullet proof tools. Low tooth count as compared to other designs, but they will eat nails as far as toughness is concerned.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: wvginseng on January 29, 2020, 06:49:27 PM
I have some interesting ratchets like truth and some other ratchets but for some reason my good camera will not take a photo small enough to load onto this website. Thanks to everyone that has posted these photos, I have enjoyed them.
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: p_toad on January 29, 2020, 06:53:03 PM
Take the photo...load it onto your computer (assumes you have one), use Irfanview or a similar free program to downsize it (I make mine around 250k) and then you can load it here.   
Title: Re: Inside a ratchet: How they work
Post by: Papaw on January 29, 2020, 08:36:59 PM
Look in the picture forum and you will see how to do it.