Tool Talk

Blacksmith and Metal Working Forum => Blacksmith and Metalworking Forum => Topic started by: lazyassforge on June 01, 2011, 07:42:57 AM

Title: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: lazyassforge on June 01, 2011, 07:42:57 AM
Papaw asked if I could re-post the power hammer rebuild thread that was lost in the melt down.

This is the frame of a hammer which has sat in the back of my shop for 7 or 8 years. The hammer is in VERY rough shape, I would have not bought it except I wanted another hammer and the man who owned it insisted I buy this one too or he would not sell me the other hammer!

First Pic.: To start off, the dovetail where the bottom die goes in the hammer frame was broken off. I could have welded it back together but the repair would always be suspect. So I took the frame to Sid Suedmeier in Nebraska and had him cut off the old dovetail and cut a new dovetail so a sow block (later model little giants came from the factory with sow blocks)

Second and third pic.: After a couple of road trips to Nebraska, I got home with the frame with the sow block installed! You can see where they cut the frame and recut a new dovetail in the frame to install the sowblock.
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: lzenglish on June 01, 2011, 08:09:11 AM
That is a nice looking machine! Are there different hammer heads used for different applications for it?

Wayne
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: Nolatoolguy on June 01, 2011, 06:01:59 PM
Looking good.

Thanks for rebuilding the thread.
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: Fatboy on June 02, 2011, 03:17:08 PM
Looking good.

Thanks for rebuilding the thread.

Me Too! Thank you, I really liked this thread. You do remarkable work and I enjoy watching it.
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: lazyassforge on June 02, 2011, 06:49:57 PM
Oh, by the way, this hammer was covered with dirt rust and oil! I had taken a wire wheel on a 4-1/2" grinder and cleaned the frame when I tore it down a few years ago.

Pic 1: The first thing that needeed to be done was to get the pivot shaft for the foot treadle freed up. The years sitting in the dirt and crud in the blacksmith shop had caused the shaft to "grow" together with the frame. In preparation for getting it out, I ran a 1/2"-13 die across the threads to clean them up and make them fit "modern" nuts. Then I drilled a hole through the frame and into the shaft a little. This will allow me to get oil into the center of the shaft and hole.

Pic 2: I gathered up a "coupling nut"(long nut) with a bolt screwed half way through. This will be screwed on the end of the stud to give a place to hammer on without mushrooming the end of the shaft. also a short, heavy tube large enough to clear the body of the shaft and a couple heavy washers and a 1/2" standard nut.

Pic 3: We put the pieces together on the shaft and tighten the nut as tight as we dare! Then spray liberal amounts of penetrating oil at both ends of the shaft and in the drilled hole.

Pic 4: Heat the frame with the torch till it shows some red color in the shade. Tighten the nut on the end to put pressure on the shaft and hit the bolt w/coupling nut with the hammer. Spray more oil. Repeat. I heated this one up several times and then let it cool overnight and repeated the sequence the next night. Luckily it came out with just a couple of cycles!

Pic 5: Getting the shaft out of the frame was the main objective, saving the shaft was just a bonus!

Pic 6: I tapped the hole drilled earlier so I could put a grease zerk to keep the pivot lubricated.

Pic 7: First step finished!
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: 64longstep/Brian on June 04, 2011, 02:18:41 AM
I would love to be a fly on the wall of your shop and watch you at work…
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: lazyassforge on June 13, 2011, 03:44:14 AM
The babbit bearings in the frame need to be replaced.

Pic. #1 I put a block under the end of the frame to prop it up in preparation of melting the old babbit out.

Pic.#2 This is what the old babbit bearing looked like.

Pic. #3 Melting the old bearings out. I save the old bearings and remelt them to pour the new bearings.

Pic #4 When the factory poured the original bearings, they used leather shims. I cut mine in a diamond shape.

Pic #5 Shims set in place. They will be adjusted to keep the "dummy" shaft centered and square in the frame.

Pic#6 Checking the dummy shaft for squareness to the ram guides. I use a dummy shaft because the shaft for the hammer has a flywheel and pulleys on it making it difficult to use.
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: lazyassforge on June 13, 2011, 04:00:09 AM
Pic#1 I use locking collars on the shaft for dams to stop the babbit from running out the ends of the cavity.

Pic#2 We use damming compound to seal the locking collars to the frame. Roll the damming putty between your hands to make a slim "rope". Put it between the frame and the collar and push the collar in place squishing the compound out. The chain is used with a rubber tarp strap to hold the shaft in place while pouring the babbit.

Pic#3 The set up I use to melt the babbit. Notice the scrap babbit!

Pic#4 The frame must be heated to 350-400 degrees. When a oily rag smokes when wiped across the frame it is about right! If the frame is not heated, the babbit will "freeze" and make cold joints and incomplete fill in the bearing.

Pic#5 Pouring the babbit. Watch for the babit to leak out of the cavity if you missed getting it all sealed up! The molten babbit runs like water.
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: bc_z on June 16, 2011, 03:29:20 PM
WOW!

excellent tutorial on replacing/pouring new babbit.  Great rebuild.

bc_z
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: lazyassforge on June 17, 2011, 08:07:36 PM
Picture #1. After pouring the bottom half of the bearing I pulled the dummy shaft so the excess babbit can be filed off to leave the mating surface flat for the shims.

Picture #2. I don't know who that old, fat man is! I, er, he is filing the excess babbit off.

Picture #3. The dummy shaft re installed. The plates are temporary shims are used while pouring to give room to put the gasket material shims when the bearings are set up. As the bearings wear, shims are removed to keep the bearing clearance correct.

Picture #4. The top cap bolted in position with the temporary shims in place.

Picture #5. Good help makes the job go better! My wife putting on the daming compound.

Picture #6. Damming compound in place. This bearing is ready to pour!
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: lazyassforge on June 17, 2011, 08:18:23 PM
Picture #1. Pre heating the top cap before pouring the babbit.

Picture #2. Pouring the top cap bearing through the oil reservoir.

Picture #3. This is the oil cavity on the top cap filled with babbit.

Picture #4. The cap removed and ready to rasp the excess babbit off the mating surfaces.

Picture #5. Using a torch to melt the excess babbit out of the oil reservoir.

Picture # 6. Oil hole cleaned out through the cap so bearings can be oiled. Someone had drilled an extra hole in this cap sometime in the past.
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: lazyassforge on June 23, 2011, 08:54:17 PM
Picture #1. Next part of the project. This is the main shaft with the flywheel/crank and clutch spider on the shaft and the clutch pulley next to it. The babbit bearing is worn enough that there is slack between the clutch pulley and the spider. The slack will cause the clutch to "grab" as it engages.

Picture #2. This is the old clutch with the old bearing in place.

Picture #3. Using a weed burner to burn off the old grease and melt out the old babbit bearing out of the clutch pulley.

Picture #4. Using the wire wheel mounted in an air powered die grinder to remove the remaining rust and grease.

Picture #5. This is my fixture for pouring the bearing in the clutch pulleys. The mandrel has a slight taper so when it is time to remove it, you can use a press to get it started out and the taper will let it come easily. I used tape on the outside of the mandrel as an experiment to get it to release easier. I have used spray graphite and acetylene soot in the past for a release with varying sucess.

Picture #6. We put daming compound on the bottom of the clutch pulley to seal it to the fixture.
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: lazyassforge on June 23, 2011, 09:07:09 PM
Picture #1. Bolting the clutch pulley to the pouring fixture. The mandrel is centered in the pulley by measuring with a tape measure. Bolting it down keeps it from moving off center or "floating" up and letting the babbit escape out from under the clutch.

Picture #2. Pre-heating the clutch pulley and fixture so the babbit will flow and not "freeze" when it contacts the pulley.

Picture #3. Pouring the babbit.

Picture #4. Oops! Someone had drilled some holes between the bore on the pulley and the groove where the clutch actuating ring rides. The babbit hit those holes and ran like water! Have to tear it all down and clean up, re-group and do it all again! (With the holes plugged!)

Picture #5. Repour!

Picture #6. Well, I got sloppy and spilled some babbit so the cavity didn't totally fill!
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: lazyassforge on June 23, 2011, 09:17:32 PM
Picture #1. I used some small scraps of babbit and the torch to remelt the top area of the bearing and blend the babbit together to fill the top of the bearing.

Picture #2. The cutch pulley removed from the fixture. The mandrel still needs to be pressed out of the babbit. (no, the tape didn't work very well to release the babbit)

Picture #3. The babbit bearing is bored out to size (a couple thousanths clearance from the spider) and the clutch friction area cleaned up while still in the chuck so both areas run concentric with each other.

Picture #4. Checking the fit on the spider.

Picture #5. Clutch/shaft assembly in place!
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: Papaw on June 24, 2011, 05:26:48 AM
Short of being a video, this is the best step-by-step rebuild I nave ever had the pleasure to witness. Even when you make a mistake, you show us!
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: lazyassforge on June 25, 2011, 04:12:49 AM
Picture #1. Painting the hammer sure makes it look better!

Picture #2. This is the old toggle arms with the crosshead and crank pittman. pretty well used up!

Picture #3. See the wear on the holes. Sometime in the past someone had brazed the holes to repair them. I plan on welding the holes shut. I will have to grind away all the old brass to clean steel so the brass won't mess up the weld.

Picture #4. The holes all welded closed.

Picture #5. The welds ground flush.

Picture #6. This is the fixture I use to drill the new holes in the toggle arms. I was shown this way of holding the toggle arms by Sid Sudemier from Nebraska.
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: lazyassforge on June 25, 2011, 08:50:28 AM
Picture #1. The arm setting on the fixture. The spring seat is the only machined part on the toggle arm so I square the spring seat to the fixture.

Picture #2. And then put small tack welds on each end to hold the arm in position.

Picture #3. After laying out the hole locations I use the drill press to drill the holes.

Picture #4. With the holes drilled, I just grind the tack welds off and knock the arm loose from the fixture.

Picture #5. To drill the crosshead I just level the crosshead and tack it in place on the fixture plate.

Picture #6. Using a hand drill to open the oil holes back up.
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: Nolatoolguy on June 26, 2011, 12:20:58 PM
Looking good. Love watching the progress you are making!
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: lazyassforge on July 04, 2011, 03:09:14 PM
Picture #1. Next up is the broken ram guide. At some time in the past the ram was broken and re welded. Some time after that, there must have been a really good crash because the whole top half was broken from the guide. I think it would be impossible to run the hammer with the guide broken like this. The guide shows more wear than I have ever seen on a guide!

Picture #2. This is comparing a good guide with the broken guide.

Picture #3. I machined a new center piece for the guide out of 4140 steel and cut a couple of filler pieces out of mild steel. Sid from little giant has used A36 angle iron and found that the metal would gall between the ram and the ram guide. Hopefully the 4140 will not have this problem!

Picture #4. The repair pieces clamped to a steel plate to align the parts.

Picture #5. I tacked the pieces on one side and then flipped them to tack the other side.

Picture #6. While welding I flipped the parts back and forth, welding on one side and then the other to equalize the stresses from the welding. After welding the parts I used the flypress to straighten the slight bow left in the parts.
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: lazyassforge on July 04, 2011, 03:22:04 PM
Picture #1. The ram guide had been repaired sometime in the past. There was a band welded around the guide. I decided to use a band saw to remove the band because I thought that using the cutting torch I would gouge the guide. I should not have worried, when it was welded, they had undercut the welds so bad that some of the gouges were about 3/16" deep! I used up an old bandsaw blade I had held on to for no reason!

Picture #2. I then cut the center section out of the old guide. There is extra material left on the halves so I can align the center section.

Picture #3. I bolted the ram guide halves in place on the hammer frame with spacers to allow room for the adjusting shims.

Picture #4. I Put the ram in place to help align the center section.

Picture #5. Using the ram to align the center section while I mark for the final cuts on the guide halves.

Picture #6. The ram guide halves marked for the final cuts.
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: lazyassforge on July 04, 2011, 06:47:37 PM
Picture #1. The new center tacked in place on the ram guide after a final trim and some grinding for clearance.

Picture #2. I cut a template for marking the profile of the ram guide by using the ram guide on one of the other hammers for a pattern.

Picture #3. The corners still needed a little more filler. Here it is tacked into place.

Picture #4. Here is the ram guide welded up and the excess trimmed off.

Picture #5. The guide still needs to be adjusted, It is too open at the top. I used the clamps to pull it back but it keeps springing back out!

Picture #6. A little heat in the right spot will let the metal give and stay where you pull it to. However, it is not an exact science!

Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: lazyassforge on July 04, 2011, 06:51:17 PM
Picture #1. When I went too far, I had to use a bolt to jack the guide back out a little!

Picture #2. The ram guide painted and in place. I may still have to do a little adjustment when I get the hammer running but it is real close for now!
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: m_fumich on July 05, 2011, 05:38:02 PM
Too bad the original thread was lost. There was much more descriptive detail in the original thread. I'd love to see this whole process in book form. I could read this kind of stuff for hours.
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: lazyassforge on July 06, 2011, 04:57:17 AM
Yes, I agree the new thread isn't as "filled out" as the original. There was more give and take and side discussions on the original thread. I know I tended to jump around on what I was working on when the original thread was created. Now I am just sifting through a jumble of pictures!

Bill D.
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: Papaw on July 06, 2011, 06:05:19 AM
I hope we are going to be treated to a video of it working!
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: lazyassforge on July 06, 2011, 07:33:47 AM
Papaw,

First, I have got to finish the hammer! I have not actually worked on it in two or three months! I have had a lot of other projects going and the hammer doesn't have a high priority right now!

I did find time to take the grand kids to the Fourth of July parade in town.
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: Papaw on July 06, 2011, 07:41:52 AM
Modernized buckboard? I like it!
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: 64longstep/Brian on December 12, 2011, 11:57:57 PM
Any new updates?
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: lazyassforge on December 14, 2011, 04:33:48 AM
Longstep,

I do have some more pictures of the little giant rebuild so far that need to be posted. I have not worked on the hammer beyond moving it a couple times this summer. As it gets into winter I will get back and finish it but right now my main tractor is backed into the shop needing the front axle rebuilt! The tractor will have to get fixed before I can get back to the hammer.

Bill D.
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: Branson on December 14, 2011, 06:19:09 AM
I am frankly amazed at the work you have done.   Just amazed.
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: Nolatoolguy on January 12, 2014, 05:44:36 PM
I know no one has posted in this thread in a while but I just cant resist.

How is it going, have you got it fully operational yet?
Title: Re: 25 lb. Little Giant power hammer rebuild
Post by: lazyassforge on January 13, 2014, 11:05:58 AM
Nolatoolguy,

Yes, I have finally got the thing running and moved into the blacksmith shop!(about 6 months ago) I finally ran out of excuses and got to work on it. It only took a couple of evenings to do what I had put off for a couple of years! Unfortunately, I didn't get any more pictures of building the motor mount and doing the final adjustments!

Thanks for asking!

Bill D.