Tool Talk

Wrench Forum => Wrench Forum => Topic started by: lzenglish on June 12, 2011, 07:06:43 AM

Title: Early Willams "S" Wrench
Post by: lzenglish on June 12, 2011, 07:06:43 AM
I found this Willams "S" wrench yesterday. It is marked #863H, and is 1/2", & 9/16". I could not find this particular model number on A.A., or in my short google search, but I believe they first used the mark in 1919?

Wayne
Title: Re: Early Willams "S" Wrench
Post by: strik9 on June 12, 2011, 07:33:30 AM
That is a tool post wrench (as opposed to a mechanic's wrench) probably used to adjust a machine in some sort of factory.  The square cut ends are for square posts of parts fixed to the lathe tools or whatever used them.  A WAG  on my part but I have seen them on really old woodworking machines in a place I had worked.
Title: Re: Early Willams "S" Wrench
Post by: rusty on June 12, 2011, 07:50:26 AM

I suspect, but can not prove, that that pattern is a bit older than that. Williams bought the drop forge plant in Chicago from Whitman & Barnes in 1902. W&B wrenches do not have that ribbed pattern, but Union s-wrenches do, and match Willliams almost exactly. Later S-wrenches look like W&B S-wrenches with no ribs....

I don't have evry many samples to compare tho : (

>That is a tool post wrench

Yes and no, many early machines were assembled with square head bolts and nuts, a square end wrench would also be common for Ag machinery...
Title: Re: Early Willams "S" Wrench
Post by: strik9 on June 12, 2011, 09:18:25 AM
Rusty = the tool history oracle.  I wish I knew half of what you do, or at least half of where to look for the info!!!   (you can put that in your avatar area too, and should.)

I love these old relic wrenches for their diverse forms and appearances.  I actually prefer getting the worn and bashed ones to repair and possibly use rather than wreck a perfect example by using it.  These old relics really do vary in steel quality that much.
Title: Re: Early Willams "S" Wrench
Post by: eddie hudson on June 12, 2011, 09:56:02 AM
I found this Willams "S" wrench yesterday. It is marked #863H, and is 1/2", & 9/16". I could not find this particular model number on A.A., or in my short google search, but I believe they first used the mark in 1919?

Wayne

I believe they started using the Brooklyn oval logo in 1914 to designate tools made in Brooklyn and not in the new plant in Buffalo. Your wrench has the older logo which they used before 1914.
Title: Re: Early Willams "S" Wrench
Post by: lzenglish on June 12, 2011, 12:10:38 PM
Thanks for all the comments and info. guys.

Wayne