Author Topic: I can't get the hang of it.  (Read 3489 times)

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Offline OilyRascal

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I can't get the hang of it.
« on: December 19, 2013, 04:27:39 PM »
I learned today where this expression originated; apparently a term that comes from re-handling (an axe?), also known as "hanging".
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Offline Branson

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Re: I can't get the hang of it.
« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2013, 10:52:46 AM »
Got to get the right "hang" for the bit -- the geometry of the relation between the edge, the depth of the bit, and the handle.  Varies from ax to ax, and specific use.  Like a shipwright's ax has a different hang from a felling ax or a broad ax.

Offline OilyRascal

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Re: I can't get the hang of it.
« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2013, 11:19:22 AM »
Just so I'm clear, to get the "hang" is the process of refining the end of the handle such that it fits correctly in the bit (depth, width, geometry of the hole, etc)?
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Offline Branson

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Re: I can't get the hang of it.
« Reply #3 on: December 21, 2013, 08:42:31 AM »
Just so I'm clear, to get the "hang" is the process of refining the end of the handle such that it fits correctly in the bit (depth, width, geometry of the hole, etc)?

Mmmm...   Maybe it's just me, but the geometry of the hole doesn't much enter the picture.  To me, that's just fitting.  Getting the hang is about putting the handle in the right position to get the most efficient work out of the edge.  For a shipwright's ax, that means that the handle sweeps up from the edge of the bit in a long curve that is something like four or five inches above the bit.  Utterly useless in a felling ax.  Does that make sense? 

Offline Papaw

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Re: I can't get the hang of it.
« Reply #4 on: December 21, 2013, 09:01:16 AM »
I thought part of it would be whether it was for a right hander or left hander.
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Offline keykeeper

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Re: I can't get the hang of it.
« Reply #5 on: December 21, 2013, 09:05:18 AM »
Someone told me once that on axes, the proper handle length was easily calculated by standing the edge on end, then when the center of the bit is hitting the edge of a hard surface the angle from the eye back would give you an approximate length. If that makes sense. Maybe that is what it means.

Basically... center of bit, the handle eye, and the unknown forms a triangle. The long side from eye to x(end of handle) being the length.

I know, confusing. I need more coffee to think straighter this morning..
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Offline Branson

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Re: I can't get the hang of it.
« Reply #6 on: December 22, 2013, 10:38:46 AM »
I thought part of it would be whether it was for a right hander or left hander.

Actually, it's more often talked about in dealing with single bit felling axes.

Offline Branson

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Re: I can't get the hang of it.
« Reply #7 on: December 22, 2013, 10:42:04 AM »
Someone told me once that on axes, the proper handle length was easily calculated by standing the edge on end, then when the center of the bit is hitting the edge of a hard surface the angle from the eye back would give you an approximate length. If that makes sense. Maybe that is what it means.

Basically... center of bit, the handle eye, and the unknown forms a triangle. The long side from eye to x(end of handle) being the length.


Length is more a matter of fit to the comfortable use of the individual -- the angle remains the same as the hypotenuse remains the same regardless of its length. 

It's the angle of the handle to the center of the edge that matters.

Offline rusty

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Re: I can't get the hang of it.
« Reply #8 on: December 22, 2013, 12:44:09 PM »
>Actually, it's more often talked about in dealing with single bit felling axes.
>It's the angle of the handle to the center of the edge that matters.

Related issues, because the center of mass is offset from the handle hole on a single bit axe, or for that matter, any tool where the tool is mostly on one side of the head. If the offset of the handle does not match the offset of the mass in the head, the head will 'kick' the handle back in your hand on impact, uncomfortable, and wastefull of swing energy....
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Offline scottg

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Re: I can't get the hang of it.
« Reply #9 on: December 22, 2013, 01:51:00 PM »
 
 Axes generally wear fastest at the top of the edge. I mean, if you are going to miss and hit a rock with any ax, where is the most likely place to hit it? At the top of the edge of course. Every really old heavily used ax you see (or most of them anyway) are badly worn at the top.
  So a rock solid handle mounting, and then reshaping the ax to match, is more important than the couple of degrees you may be able to change the handle mounting.

  If hanging an ax doesn't really mean shaping the edge? Well it should. 

  The center of the edge is not really the most powerful place to strike. Most axes are ground for it, but its not the true best.
 The lowest part of the edge you can accurately hit has the most power behind it, by far.

 When hewing with a broad hatchet that has a reasonably straight edge, this is superbly apparent. You take the deepest bites at the bottom, clean the waste with the middle, and feather trim it with the top of the edge.
  After a few hours serious hewing, nobody needs to tell you this.
 

 In many places it just means gaining the necessary skill to excel at whatever you are doing. But we all knew that.  \
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Offline rusty

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Re: I can't get the hang of it.
« Reply #10 on: December 22, 2013, 02:21:44 PM »
> it just means gaining the necessary skill to excel

Oh...if only I had a video of the first time I tried to cut down a tree with an axe...you would all be laughing hysterically....
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Offline amertrac

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Re: I can't get the hang of it.
« Reply #11 on: January 06, 2014, 08:48:14 AM »
I thought part of it would be whether it was for a right hander or left hander.
I have both left and right broad axes and they are HANGING on the wall  bob w.
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Offline tucker

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Re: I can't get the hang of it.
« Reply #12 on: January 06, 2014, 01:13:31 PM »
good for you bobw,they will disappear up there own arses soon.
brian

Offline bear_man

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Re: I can't get the hang of it.
« Reply #13 on: June 17, 2014, 01:36:15 AM »
At least you haven't planted geraniums in them.  Yet.   *he grins*