Author Topic: Ever stop to think,  (Read 2659 times)

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Offline john k

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Ever stop to think,
« on: August 29, 2014, 09:50:00 PM »
In more than one place on this board and several others of like ilk, I have seen the high praise of still owning ones fathers or grandfathers tools.   On another board some time back,  a tool collector was surmising what his grandfather would think of his collection and probably be asking, "What you gonna do with all this stuff?"   I was at my work bench, in my new shop, sawing on a piece of 2x4, trying to make something recognizable and a similar thought came to me today.    My grandfather had a tiny stand alone shop, about six by fifteen feet, with a decent bench in front of a window.   I know my father worked in there some, but at home we never really got a workshop together.   Just a rough old shed with electricity, for the welder and grinder.   Most work was done outside.   I got to thinking what he would think of my building,  with a solid wooden bench, a hanging light over same.    2 tool boxes on wheels within grabbing distance.   Steel shelving behind for a quickly growing collection of stuff, with racks on the wall for screwdrivers and pliers.   What would he think of the pile of hand saws, and hand crank eggbeater drills.  Seems I have accumulated way more than he ever had, and am I using it all wisely?   Should I clean out, dispose of everything but one of each?   Or keep collecting because it makes me happy, and having the right tool is a very comfortable spot to be in.   Woodworking, mechanicing, blacksmithing, welding, general fabrication  takes a lot of stuff and the space to keep it in.    I have 2 tools that belonged to my grandfather, and can point them out easily.   I have most of my fathers things, including a 1947 Craftsman wrench set,  jacks, and for sure a double bit axe.   His wooden machinist tool box sits on the work bench,  and I have a special place for the hammer, he put his intials on when working in a defense plant in WWII.    It all suits me, but sometimes wonder what he would make of all this.   Just thinking.
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Offline Chillylulu

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Re: Ever stop to think,
« Reply #1 on: August 29, 2014, 11:13:34 PM »
You answered your own question, and, as one T Jefferson said somewhere "right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness"

And you said "...keep collecting because it makes me happy, and having the right tool is a very comfortable spot to be in."

Its your right and any good father, as yours is, I am sure, wants happiness more than all else for his children.

If what you were doing was getting to the point of being unhealthy,  you wouldn't be asking such questions!

Chilly

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Re: Ever stop to think,
« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2014, 06:22:44 AM »
Agreed that my father would wonder why I have so many old tools, but would be happy that I use them whenever possible. He was never one to chase after the newest thing on the market.
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Offline Branson

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Re: Ever stop to think,
« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2014, 07:31:32 AM »
> Or keep collecting because it makes me happy, and having the right tool is a very comfortable spot to be in.

Seems to me that our fathers, grandfathers, and great grandfathers would have been very comfortable at
having the right tool, too.   When you need the right tool,  that tool saves time and patience.  I think our
forebears would appreciate that, and enjoy our appreciation of those of their tools that are still with
us.  Seems to me all this is, if nothing else, a monument to their lives and work.

Offline Chillylulu

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Re: Ever stop to think,
« Reply #4 on: September 05, 2014, 12:13:10 AM »
> Or keep collecting because it makes me happy, and having the right tool is a very comfortable spot to be in.

Seems to me that our fathers, grandfathers, and great grandfathers would have been very comfortable at
having the right tool, too.   When you need the right tool,  that tool saves time and patience.  I think our
forebears would appreciate that, and enjoy our appreciation of those of their tools that are still with
us.  Seems to me all this is, if nothing else, a monument to their lives and work.
I agree so much. And what I heard was about our forefathers posterity. We are their legacy, their heritage. The tools are wonderful, interesting, occasionally frustrating and, ultimately, completely full of possibility. When we see tools, apart from their features, their look, their "line and form," we see possibility.

Tools are more than just present now, they are also what we do, and create, with them. Sometimes, often when we are young, we see a particular tool we think "If I just had this or that I could really make something." And we do. We create the stuff of our lives. We build homes, careers, and families. Our forefathers might never have concieved of some of the stuff in our lives. On the other hand, they would find comfort in much of what surrounds us. Even as we are comfortable with, and seek out, the stuff of their  lives. We have more in common with them than we think.

Consequently, as the heritage of our forefathers, and ultimately as our legacy to our posterity, we, as users of tools, are the best monuments to the past as well as to the future.

 :cool:

Chilly
« Last Edit: September 05, 2014, 12:16:00 AM by Chillylulu »

Offline bear_man

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Re: Ever stop to think,
« Reply #5 on: September 05, 2014, 12:29:58 AM »
Amen, Chilly!