Author Topic: Are these home made?  (Read 1970 times)

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Offline skipskip

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Are these home made?
« on: June 07, 2015, 04:01:03 PM »
Neat hammers

phenolic handles?


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Offline Papaw

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Re: Are these home made?
« Reply #1 on: June 07, 2015, 04:39:35 PM »
If homemade, it is a very good job.
Are you sure the handles are phenolic? Could they be denim micarta?
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Offline skipskip

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Re: Are these home made?
« Reply #2 on: June 07, 2015, 06:59:26 PM »
If homemade, it is a very good job.
Are you sure the handles are phenolic? Could they be denim micarta?

there's always that ONE guy who has to ask the question...

denim micarta, what the heck is that?

used as insulating material, or for heat resistance?

or to make pants?
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Offline Aunt Phil

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Re: Are these home made?
« Reply #3 on: June 07, 2015, 07:56:54 PM »
If homemade, it is a very good job.
Are you sure the handles are phenolic? Could they be denim micarta?

there's always that ONE guy who has to ask the question...

denim micarta, what the heck is that?

used as insulating material, or for heat resistance?

or to make pants?

It's a ripoff of the Formica company's Registered trade marked out the wazoo product line.  Micarta  is the name of the phenolic hard plastic that Formica is based on.   Micarta sort of went industrial while Formica took the homeowner and commercial countertop market.  Formica outwore everyone else trying to produce a phenolic top material because they buried their color layer 3 layers deep in clear plastic, and patented that part of the deal so nobody else could copy it.

Denim Micarta was very popular because it employed stacks of resin soaked denim to give the final product more strength.  It's also pure hell to machine because it eats cutters.
It's been largely replaced by fiberglass today, although phenolic caster wheels are still being produced in a US factory. 
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