Author Topic: Laying track  (Read 1473 times)

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Offline johnsironsanctuary

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Laying track
« on: October 19, 2011, 01:08:11 PM »
This one is for Stoney.

http://www.wimp.com/traintrack/
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Offline Papaw

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Re: Laying track
« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2011, 01:51:07 PM »
Every time I see that video, I watch it to the end! fantastic.
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Offline kxxr

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Re: Laying track
« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2011, 03:54:56 PM »
  Years ago, I had experience at each of those jobs the old fashioned way at one time or another; on steel gangs, tie gangs and on section crews. There was automation for many of the various jobs then (late 70s), but I have never seen an 'all in one operation' like that. Awesome!! The closest operation I have seen would be the laying of ribbon rail onto an already prepared bed. The work train would run on temporary rails and the ribbon rail would thread through giant bobbins onto the bed. After it had passed, the crew would move in, remove the spikes from the temporary rail and roll it out and then pry the ribbon rail into place and spike it down and anchor it. That is a pretty impressive operation also but still way more hand labor than what is required in the video. You wouldn't believe that those long strings of rail are so flexible, just like giant licorice ropes, if you haven't seen it. You don't want to be standing in the wrong place if an end gets away and wants to straighten itself out. If it doesn't cut you in half, it will definitely knock you out of the park.
  I am surprised to see the crew on film without hard hats and safety glasses. With all the injury lawsuits the railroads endure, that was a big no-no back then and probably still is. We'd have been run off on the spot. They would have big safety campaigns from time to time and everyone would be compliant for a few months before getting lax again. Then, the safety meetings would start again.
  Thanks for sharing the video. It's great to see the automation but I am pretty certain that the old way of doing things is alive and well on the 'back roads'.

Offline Stoney

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Re: Laying track
« Reply #3 on: October 19, 2011, 04:43:09 PM »
Thanks Johnsironsanctuary that was great and Kxxr I know if you went lax on safety at Southern Bell you would no longer be there and Railroad work is so much more dangerous.  Give me a day or two to load and I'll post a folder of Norfolk Southern replacing the rails on the Huntsville to Chattanooga main and a CSX crew replacing ties at Cowan.
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Offline Papaw

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Re: Laying track
« Reply #4 on: October 19, 2011, 07:15:45 PM »
I think that video is from Europe somewhere.
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Offline johnsironsanctuary

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Re: Laying track
« Reply #5 on: October 19, 2011, 09:00:57 PM »
My friend Don says that when he was on a track crew in the 50's, the section foreman would stand 150 to 200 feet from a new rail being laid and could see pluses or minuses of gauge in a straight rail to 1/16 of an inch. Amazing! He said he got to stand behind the foreman one time and you really can see it clearly.
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