Author Topic: Collecting Antidote?  (Read 615 times)

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Offline turnnut

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Re: Collecting Antidote?
« Reply #15 on: June 05, 2017, 08:44:32 AM »
  I plead the 5th !

Offline Chillylulu

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Re: Collecting Antidote?
« Reply #16 on: June 13, 2017, 10:00:01 AM »
I'd bet most of us could say that our shops are full of sh-tuff. Now if you ask the wife about my shop she leaves off the uff.
Took me a second to get that. And that's my wife's favorite cuss word!  I've veen working hard as my broken body will let me. Im determined to high grade and be more selective. Always been more of a hoarder, but I'm going to sell off/ trade off the non-special tools and the duplicates. If I do that and move a few kilns down into the basement, I'll have room to make things again.

Chilly
 (determined to spring clean, even if it takes me through next winter)

Offline Bill Houghton

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Re: Collecting Antidote?
« Reply #17 on: June 13, 2017, 11:56:55 AM »
Chilly,

Pottery kilns?  Wood-drying kilns?

Offline p_toad

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Re: Collecting Antidote?
« Reply #18 on: June 13, 2017, 02:20:28 PM »
Chilly,

Pottery kilns?  Wood-drying kilns?

Glass kilns?   Steel kilns?   Inquiring minds want to know.   :smiley:

Offline Chillylulu

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Re: Collecting Antidote?
« Reply #19 on: June 18, 2017, 11:01:53 PM »
Mostly glass, but they work for tempering/ annealing. 3 commercial glass kilns.

Glass kilns tend to be shorter, with elements in the lid and sides.  More even heating, but they dont have to get as hot as ceeamic kilns. Most art glass is pretty well molten just above 1600º.  But at any point where it softens it becomes a matter of heat/time.  At 1250º it takes a certain amount of time to get some effect. At 1450º you can get to the same point a lot quicker.

My largest kiln is 25" x 48" but is only 13.5" deep. Its big enough to make a sink in.

I also have the remains of a tall ceramic kiln that one of the schools was getting rid of.  Someone cut the cord off the controller,  but everything still works. I'm breaking it down for its parts. Fire brick cab be used for a small foundry.   I also use fire bricks for gold/sikver smithing. It is soft and you can cut it to hold irregularly shaped pieces to solder. Additionally,  I like to line the area behind my annealing pan.

We've also got a refractory lined hot box that my son used when making bows. And a small kiln - old school with just two switches to control the heating elements.  Its pretty much an annealing kiln.

Chilly