Author Topic: Large pipe die sizes  (Read 89 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline CLamb

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
Large pipe die sizes
« on: November 26, 2017, 03:35:43 PM »
I'm looking to get 2 1/2" dies for my Ridgid 4P threader. I see dies for other threaders, such as Toledo, going for much lower prices. I'm wondering if direct substitution or substitution with shims is possible. I don't want to try precision machining the dies. However, I can't seem to find the dimensions of the various manufacturers dies anywhere online. Does anyone know of a source? Just for the record the Ridgid 4P dies are ~621.5mils parallel to the threads and ~747.9mils perpendicular to the threads.

Offline p_toad

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 216
Re: Large pipe die sizes
« Reply #1 on: November 26, 2017, 03:48:42 PM »
Welcome to the TT forum.   Sorry i can't answer you question, but maybe someone out there knows.   :huh:

Offline Papaw

  • Owner/Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9133
  • Alvin, Texas
    • Papawswrench
Re: Large pipe die sizes
« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2017, 06:33:43 PM »
I welcome you also, and also have no answers for you. I bet someone will come along soon that knows.
Member of PHARTS - Perfect Handle Admiration, Restoration and Torturing Society
 
 Photobucket - http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v439/papao55/

Online bill300d

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 894
Re: Large pipe die sizes
« Reply #3 on: November 26, 2017, 06:59:28 PM »
I am of no help either except to welcome you.
A person who could really read human minds would be privileged to gaze on some correct imitations of chaos.

Offline Chillylulu

  • CONTRIBUTOR
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1416
Re: Large pipe die sizes
« Reply #4 on: December 07, 2017, 10:28:48 AM »
2½" -8" have the same threads.  8TPI, tapered at 3/4"/ft  (or 1/16"/inch)

Those threaders use one size of dies and cut 2½", 3", 3½", and 4" pipe threads.

We still run into 3½" pipe.

We would use them on the pipe clamped in a pipe vise.  The power was supplied through a bar about 6' long with 2 u-joints, with the other end in a 300 machine.

Old fitters would talk about being careful because if the bar with the u-joints  bound up it would flip the power machine, the vise with the pipe or both. The mayhem would stop when the set-up had flipped far enough away to pull the cord. 

Now all the power machines have foot pedal switches.

Chilly