Author Topic: New on here -Vintage Tools - would like to know what they are and how I can sell  (Read 382 times)

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Offline kblount

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I have vintage tools and would like to know what they are and how I can sell and find out how much they are worth.    They came from my late husbands grandfather who started a company doing Vaudeville scenery I believe in the 1800's.    His father also was in the scenic industry doing Broadway shows as well as the first CBS show and many other tv shows.  I believe these were passed down from his grandfather in the late 1800's.   

Thank you.

Offline p_toad

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Looks like a couple of ratcheting/spiral drive screwdrivers, a pair of tin snips, a nail puller, a ???, a plane.   Bottom row looks like maybe a set of   number punches, a sharpening stone, a knife, and above the knife...a nice folding handle drawknife.


Not sure without more info on what they're really worth, but there are lots of smart folks here who might be able to tell you more.

the ??? may be rests for a lathe.

Offline Lewill2

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The pieces between the nail puller and the wood plane look to be 3 different types of tool rests for a wood lathe.

Offline Bill Houghton

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I hate to disappoint about value, but most hand tools are not worth a lot on the market.

Depending on the age of the plane, if you cleaned it up, sharpened the iron, and marketed it well on, say, WoodNet (https://www.forums.woodnet.net/), you might get $40 for it; but that depends on the age and condition, and whether you know enough to clean it up and sharpen it.

The folding drawknife might have some value (again, in the $40 range); depends on its maker.

The value of the sharpening stone will depend on what kind it is.  If it's an Arkansas stone, could have some value (again, Woodnet); if it's a more common aluminum oxide stone, maybe a dollar or two.

The other stuff, maybe $1 to $5.

Is there no one in your family - if not you and your immediate family, a nephew, niece, cousin? - who might want them?  The emotional value of tools passed down in the family goes far, far beyond the dollar value.

Offline kwoswalt99

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I hate to disappoint about value, but most hand tools are not worth a lot on the market.

Depending on the age of the plane, if you cleaned it up, sharpened the iron, and marketed it well on, say, WoodNet (https://www.forums.woodnet.net/), you might get $40 for it; but that depends on the age and condition, and whether you know enough to clean it up and sharpen it.

The folding drawknife might have some value (again, in the $40 range); depends on its maker.

The value of the sharpening stone will depend on what kind it is.  If it's an Arkansas stone, could have some value (again, Woodnet); if it's a more common aluminum oxide stone, maybe a dollar or two.

The other stuff, maybe $1 to $5.

Is there no one in your family - if not you and your immediate family, a nephew, niece, cousin? - who might want them?  The emotional value of tools passed down in the family goes far, far beyond the dollar value.

Wow where do you sell your tools at, I can't get $5 for hand planes lol.

Offline Papaw

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I agree with this- "The emotional value of tools passed down in the family goes far, far beyond the dollar value."

On another note, I question the idea that those tools all came from the 1880s.
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Offline wvtools

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Is there a name on the plane?

The knife might be worth 15-20.

I usually get 20-25 for nail pullers, but it looks like the top handle may be chipped, which drops it a lot.

The number stamps sets always go for around 20.00 if complete (9 stamps from 0 to 9; the 9 is used as a 9 and a 6).

If the Yankee screwdrivers are No. 131 (spring loaded), you may get 15 for those.  That item in particular has large regional value differences.

Offline international3414

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is that a Belgian Coticule stone,i know its not but if it was?

Offline Bill Houghton

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I hate to disappoint about value, but most hand tools are not worth a lot on the market.

Depending on the age of the plane, if you cleaned it up, sharpened the iron, and marketed it well on, say, WoodNet (https://www.forums.woodnet.net/), you might get $40 for it; but that depends on the age and condition, and whether you know enough to clean it up and sharpen it.

The folding drawknife might have some value (again, in the $40 range); depends on its maker.

The value of the sharpening stone will depend on what kind it is.  If it's an Arkansas stone, could have some value (again, Woodnet); if it's a more common aluminum oxide stone, maybe a dollar or two.

The other stuff, maybe $1 to $5.

Is there no one in your family - if not you and your immediate family, a nephew, niece, cousin? - who might want them?  The emotional value of tools passed down in the family goes far, far beyond the dollar value.

Wow where do you sell your tools at, I can't get $5 for hand planes lol.
I periodically post a plane on WoodNet (linky above), and can get $35-40 for a clean, straight, sharpened No. 4 or 5 of the right period (Sweetheart and later up to World War II).  But that requires that I spend time cleaning it up, sharpening the iron, measuring the flatness of the sole, etc.  A plane with a sole out of flat won't sell for that; a plane with a defect of any sort won't sell for that.  I'll probably have an hour or two into the preparation of the plane and another 30-45 minutes boxing it up when it sells, which means I'm earning McDonald's "would you like fries with that?" money, one reason I'm moving away from bothering to sell stuff.  Too many projects I'm not getting to when I sell a tool.

Now, if I find a pristine Stanley No. 1...
« Last Edit: February 23, 2018, 11:22:16 AM by Bill Houghton »

Online EVILDR235

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I have found out over the years tools with makers names, logos and ID numbers bring better money than plain tools.


The Green Rabbit.

Offline Papaw

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Perhaps not this poster, but too many times we see someone post looking for info , but never posting again.


Maybe they don't get the answer they want and just leave ?
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Offline bill300d

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And it's not only here, I see it elsewhere.
A person who could really read human minds would be privileged to gaze on some correct imitations of chaos.