Author Topic: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study  (Read 15872 times)

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Offline Spartan-C

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #15 on: August 01, 2018, 11:23:14 AM »
Jim,

I'll take some pictures tonight and post, along with the tooth counts for each too.

Ken
Ken

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #16 on: August 01, 2018, 01:35:15 PM »
Jim- I bet these don't fit in your Type Study ! :grin:
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Offline lauver

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #17 on: August 01, 2018, 02:25:55 PM »

If Merkava is around,,,he knows a lot about this ratchet.

mrchuck,

Are you sure about this?  I think you may have Merkava confused with somebody else. 

If I remember correctly, Merk hated Crafty tools, and was instead a big Fan-Boy of Cornwell ratchets, other tools, and tool boxes.

At least that is the way I remember things...
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Offline Yadda

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #18 on: August 01, 2018, 03:20:15 PM »
Jim- I bet these don't fit in your Type Study ! :grin:

Very pretty !
You might say I have a tool collecting problem....

Online lptools

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #19 on: August 01, 2018, 04:15:59 PM »
Perfect!!!!!!
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Offline Jim C.

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #20 on: August 01, 2018, 05:58:47 PM »
Jim- I bet these don't fit in your Type Study ! :grin:

Hey Papaw,

I can absolutely assure you that there will be nothing anywhere near as cool as those ratchets in the Type Study.  Those ratchets are works of art!  The rest of the Type Study is gonna be boring compared to those.  What’s the story behind them? 

Jim C.

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #21 on: August 01, 2018, 06:16:41 PM »
These ratchets were made from Craftsman ratchets and H D Smith Perfect Handle screwdrivers by my friend Brian Jordan of thunder_forge@cox.net in Arizona. He goes by 64longstep here on Tool Talk.
The wood used for the scales is Red Cedar from a large tree downed by Hurricane Ike.

Brian made me several tools using Perfect Handle tools as a base with new handles.
 
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Offline Jim C.

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #22 on: August 02, 2018, 07:13:02 PM »
Papaw,

Your friend does fantastic work!  He did a real nice job of taking a few common ratchets and turning them into working art.  If he’s looking for more donor ratchets, I might have a few around the shop.

Jim C.
« Last Edit: August 02, 2018, 07:15:51 PM by Jim C. »
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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #23 on: August 02, 2018, 08:00:51 PM »
He hasn't been around lately, and I think he has slowed down a lot on knife making and forging. I have other things he had made for me. I once sent him a bunch of old files which he used to make knives.
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Offline Jim C.

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #24 on: August 03, 2018, 05:47:33 AM »
Wow!!!!  That guy is super talented!
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Offline Spartan-C

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #25 on: August 03, 2018, 02:59:58 PM »

Hi Spartan-C,

Thanks for checking in.  I'd like to see your dad's ratchet.  Can you post a photo or two?  I'd also be interested in knowing how many teeth it has. 40? or 32?  As for your 1980s ratchets, well, I plan to cover them through 1993, so we'll get to them.

Jim C.

Sorry, I'm late posting, been a busy week for me.  Here are a few pictures of my dad's 1/2" drive ratchet made around 1959.  It is a 32 tooth ratchet.  I'll get pictures of the other ratchets I have from my 1980 set and a couple others picked up along the way. (Sorry for the crappy pictures. If you need higher resolution pics, PM me with your email and I'll be glad to send.)

Ken
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Offline Spartan-C

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #26 on: August 03, 2018, 03:03:54 PM »
This don't really fit in with ratchets, but had to post.  It is a socket that did not make a full hit during the forging operation.  Kind of neat.  It's the only Craftsman tool I have ever received that should have been kicked out by inspection.
Ken

Offline Jim C.

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #27 on: August 04, 2018, 04:11:57 AM »
A few years ago, when I got seriously interested in buying some older Sears/Craftsman =V= era tools, a Type Study of any sort was not even remotely a thought.  After buying a couple ratchets and noticing differences between them, I started to wonder which ones were the oldest and when they were made.  And so the quest began.  While I was still not thinking about putting together an official Type Study, I was interested in when various ratchets were offered by Sears.  What I found was that it's most certainly an inexact science, and trying to put just this one segment of Craftsman ratchets into chronological order was a little tricky.  Some detective work was necessary.  While I hope the information I present is accurate, don't take it as the absolute last word on Craftsman Teardrop Ratchets.  Going forward from here, things get a little dicey to say the least.  So if you think I messed up, put things out of order, contradicted myself, or have something wrong, don't be afraid to jump in sooner than later.  If I need to make corrections, I will.  I want this Type Study to be accurate.  So, don't be afraid to ask questions.  If you make your case, I'll make the changes.       

Three years ago, when I started to publish my first shot at a Type Study, Dr. Domm was working on his Craftsman ratchet videos.  Not long after I posted what I thought were Type 1 ratchets, he contacted me and alerted me to the fact that I had mixed Type 1 and a second Type (that would eventually become Type 3 in this Type Study) together.  After considering his comments I concluded that he was right.  While the Type 2 ratchets are easily identified by their "V" shaped directional lever (VL), the Type 1 and Type 3 ratchets are somewhat similar in appearance to the untrained eye (like mine was at the time).  It was sobering because at the time I had barely published Type 1 and already, I had a major error.  That was the down side.  The up side was that I was made aware of another Type..... the Type 3 for purposes of this Type Study.  The Type 3 is significant because it was offered for a relatively short period of time, right before and during the initial introduction of the "Quick Release" (QR) function we're all so familiar with.  Based on my review of the 1967, 1968 and 1969 Sears and/or Craftsman tool catalogs, it seems clear that Sears offered both a quick release (QR) version and a non-quick release (NonQR) version at the same time between ‘67 and ‘69.  The NonQR ratchets cost a little less than their QR version counterparts.  Recall in the Type 2 discussion above, I mentioned that the 1/4" drive may have been offered up to about 1968.  As a result, the 1/4" drive Type 3 ratchet may have been in production for less time than its 1/2" and 3/8" Type 3 siblings.  That being said, while any of the Type 3 sizes are relatively scarce, I found that the 3/8" version is next to impossible to find.  I don't know why or if that's even true.  It was just my experience.  I see the 1/2" and the 1/4" now and then, but not the 3/8".  Anyway, I believe the ratchets depicted below are the last NonQR ratchets offered by Sears between 1967 and 1969.  The 1970 catalog makes no mention of the NonQR ratchets.  Going forward, all Sears/Craftsman ratchets were outfitted with the QR mechanism.  Like I said earlier, trying to put a date range on some of the individual Types in this study is mostly an educated guess at best.  Here's the Type 3 nomenclature:

Type 3:  1967 - 1969, TD, OH, LL, NonQR, PA, =V=, Non#
(represents 3/8", 1/2" drive sizes)

Type 3: 1968 - 1969, TD, OH, LL, NonQR, PA, =V=, Non#
(represents 1/4" drive size)

Early on, I had a little trouble identifying the differences between a Type 1 and Type 3 ratchet.  The four photos in the following post illustrate those differences for identification purposes.  In the first and second photos, the Type 1 is on the left and the Type 3 is on the right.  Notice the difference in shapes between the directional levers?  See how the Type 1 lever has a domed appearance while the Type 3 is more flat?  Also notice the casting difference immediately below and around the lever itself.  The Type 1 affords significantly less room to get a pair of needle nose pliers around the protrusions of the lever retention spring, while the Type 3 allows much more clearance.  For the record, taking apart Type 1 ratchets for purposes of servicing them and then re-assembling them requires a little patience.  The tolerances are really precise.  Don't say I didn't warn you!!  In the second photo, take notice how the socket post on the Type 1 is finished in chrome, while the Type 3 socket post is finished in black oxide.  In the third and fourth photos, the Type 1 handle is on top and the Type 3 is on the bottom.  See the subtle difference in the shapes of the raised panels?  Notice how the ends of the Type 1 raised panels are oval shaped while the ends on the Type 3 are more squared off in appearance?  Well there you have it.  Now you're an expert in identifying the external differences between a Type 1 and Type 3 Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet.  Please stay tuned for Type 4 . . . it's the game changer.

Jim C. 
« Last Edit: March 31, 2019, 04:37:39 AM by Jim C. »
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Offline Jim C.

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #28 on: August 04, 2018, 04:12:30 AM »
These photos depict the external differences between the Type 1 and Type 3 ratchets.  In the first two photos, the Type 1 ratchet is on the left, and Type 3 is on the right.  In the third and fourth photos, Type 1 is on top and Type 3 is on the bottom.

Jim C.
« Last Edit: August 04, 2018, 08:45:40 AM by Jim C. »
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Offline Jim C.

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #29 on: August 04, 2018, 04:23:13 AM »

Hi Spartan-C,

Thanks for checking in.  I'd like to see your dad's ratchet.  Can you post a photo or two?  I'd also be interested in knowing how many teeth it has. 40? or 32?  As for your 1980s ratchets, well, I plan to cover them through 1993, so we'll get to them.

Jim C.

Hi Spartan,

Thanks for adding the photos of your dad's ratchet.  That's clearly a Type 2.  I've noticed that a lot of the older Types are still out there working.  Although some of the more recent Sears/Craftsman ratchets aren't looked upon with favor by many, I still say they're not bad tools, particularly for the DIYer crowd.  Some the older ratchets, like yours, are absolute "tanks."  They just keep going!  Thanks for the post.

Jim C.

Sorry, I'm late posting, been a busy week for me.  Here are a few pictures of my dad's 1/2" drive ratchet made around 1959.  It is a 32 tooth ratchet.  I'll get pictures of the other ratchets I have from my 1980 set and a couple others picked up along the way. (Sorry for the crappy pictures. If you need higher resolution pics, PM me with your email and I'll be glad to send.)

Ken
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