Author Topic: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study  (Read 36190 times)

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Offline Yadda

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #45 on: August 18, 2018, 08:23:46 PM »
Finally getting into a few I may have.  Great stuff.  I will be copying all of this for future reference.

Hey Yadda,

Thanks for hanging in there.  Putting together this Type Study has been fun.  Presenting the information has also been fun, and challenging too.  I can honestly say that I had hoped this thread would become a resource people could come back to over and over.  I’m happy to hear that you’ll be saving the information I’ve presented.  I guess my only request is simple.  While I know this is a public forum and the content in this thread is pretty much unrestricted, I’d ask that if you quote it and/or refer to it somewhere in another thread or forum, that you give me a “shout out.”  Thanks in advance. 

Jim C.

Hi Jim,

Happy to oblige.  I don't expect to use it other than for personal reference, but if used otherwise I will definitely give you credit.
You might say I have a tool collecting problem....

Offline Jim C.

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #46 on: August 27, 2018, 05:22:25 PM »
If you’ve been reading along, you probably saw my re-write of the Type 9 Teardrop ratchets, where I combined Types 9A and 9B into one Type with two variations.  Well, for the same reasons described in the updated Type 9 narrative, I also combined what were previously known as Type 10A and Type 10B into one Type, that being Type 10.  Like the Type 9 examples, the Type 10 variations deal exclusively with the manufacturer’s marks, -V- and –VV-.  As I said in the Type 9 narrative, it’s my opinion that the both Type 10 variations, like the Type 9 examples, were being made at the same time possibly at two different facilities or on two different assembly lines in order to meet consumer demand.

The major change from the Type 9 ratchets to the Type 10 ratchets is the elimination of the oil holes.  So, going forward, all 1/2" drive and 3/8" drive Craftsman Teardrop Ratchets were produced without oil holes.  Also recall that I previously mentioned that the 1/4" drive ratchet never changed during the Types 9 and 10 production runs.  While the 1/2" and 3/8" ratchets no longer have an oil hole, the 1/4" retained that feature all the way through Type 13.  As a result, there is no reason to believe that a Type 10, ¼” drive exists.  Here's the Type 10 nomenclature:

Type 10:  1977/’78  - March 1981, TD, NonOH, LL, QR, FA, -V- -VV-, 44975
(represents ½” drive size)

Type 10:  1977/’78  - March 1981, TD, NonOH, LL, QR, FA, -V- -VV-, 43785
(represents 3/8” drive size)

If you go back to the post concerning the Type 4, you’ll see that I went into a little detail concerning the quick release (QR) mechanism.  At that time I discussed the spring-loaded pin that protruded through the socket post when the QR button was pushed.  The pin is clearly visible.  Well, the Type 10 ratchets are the last Teardrop versions to be offered with that visible pin.  All future Types incorporate an internal pin that is concealed inside the socket post.  I’ll bring that feature up when we get to the Type 11 narrative.  In determining the ending date for the Type 10 Teardrop ratchets, I relied on DadsTools research into the patent data.  Looking at that information, he contends that the “blind stud” or what I just referred to as the “an internal pin that is concealed inside the socket post” started showing up on RHFT ratchets in approximately March, 1981.  There’s absolutely no reason to believe that physical mechanisms/parts common to both the Teardrop ratchets and the RHFT ratchets didn’t go through the same changes at or about the same time.  Looking at the RHFT study there was legal maneuvering occurring that required Sears to make a physical change to both families of ratchets in an effort to avoid a law suit from Roberts.  For more detailed information, take a look at the RHFT Type Study, specifically focusing on the Type 7 narrative.  The “enclosed socket post/blind stud” was the answer, resulting in more “Patent Pending” stamps on Type 11 and Type 12  ratchets.

Jim C.   
« Last Edit: July 27, 2020, 07:52:55 PM by Jim C. »
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Offline p_toad

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #47 on: August 30, 2018, 08:06:01 AM »
i just saw one of those "flattop" A's when i was putting stuff out at the local Restore the other day, but didn't have time to make other notes about which it was.   Guess I'll have to take a closer look on Saturday.   :huh:

Offline Chillylulu

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #48 on: August 31, 2018, 09:31:12 AM »
I ran into a friend at an estate sale today, and he showed me what he called "some little funny-looking 3/8" Craftsman ratchet thing".
This is what came out of a plastic bucket in the back of his pickup.

https://www.google.com/search?q=craftsman+3/8+v+series+speed+spinner+ratchet&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=doLkxiQm9ApDaM%253A%252CnhBRmUnqW_XclM%252C_&usg=AFrqEzc86fiIc4n1vBhzaoTor5-EIHJkaA&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjtzvizrtTcAhVMR6wKHeRmD3AQ9QEwAnoECAEQCA#imgrc=doLkxiQm9ApDaM:

I immediately began to drool.  Offered him a price for it (he had sold me tools before) but he turned me down flat and refused to make a counteroffer, all the while saying he wanted to sell it.  He is not a ratchet guy.

I feel it is hopeless.

Sooooooo frustrating.

Hey Northwoods,

Hang in there, eventually you'll find a good one.  I looked for a while before I found the right one for my collection.  Shortly thereafter, I found a second one in slightly better condition.  They're out there.  Be patient and keep hunting!

Jim C.

I figure mine cost $1.68. 

When Jim first mentioned collecting v series craftsman tools I thought it was a pretty good idea. My thought was slightly different, I decided to go for the whole 1960 catalog (the catalog that covered 1962, when I was born. )

I lucked into an online estate auction that had a set of craftsman mechanics tools. I was surprised when I got the whole kit for $100.00.  The shipping was another $200.00.

I counted everything, but tools like allen wrench sets and 1/4" socket sets, etc. only got counted as 1 item. Dividing $300 by my count gave me around $1.68, as I remember it.

Mine is in great shape, no owners marks, plastic on the handle is clean and bright.  I don't think it was very useful,  it was only offered in one catalog.

But it sure is a pretty tool.

Chilly
« Last Edit: August 31, 2018, 09:38:54 AM by Chillylulu »

Offline p_toad

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #49 on: September 02, 2018, 09:53:14 PM »
These two followed me home the other day.   One is a Craftsman.

Offline Jim C.

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #50 on: September 03, 2018, 12:46:47 PM »
Okay, so let’s keep this Type Study moving.  There are a few things to mention regarding the Type 11 Craftsman Teardrop Ratchets.  First, you may have noticed that the ¼” drive has returned.  The last change to the ¼” drive occurred back at Type 9 and did not change until Type 11.  Also take a close look at the socket posts on all three sizes.  You should notice that the protruding pin is no longer present and the quick release (QR) mechanism is totally enclosed within the socket post itself.  My initial reaction to the enclosed socket post lead me to think it was a step taken to keep crud out of the QR mechanism and prevent jamming/malfunctions.  I also thought the design change may have been the reason the model/part numbers changed on all three drive sizes and the small letter “patent pending” stamp returned to the handle. It seemed like a reasonable assessment, however, as I stated earlier, changes were made to both Teardrop and RHFT ratchets as a result of some legal wrangling engaged in by Sears to avoid a suit from QR inventor, Pete Roberts.  Again, more on this can be found in the RHFT study.

The Type 11 ratchets will be that last time the model numbers change…… that is for the ½” and 3/8” drive sizes.  The ¼” drive will have one more model number change at Type 14.  Also, the Type 9 ratchets were the last to have oil holes…… again that is for the ½” and 3/8” drive sizes.  Notice how the ¼” drive below still has the oil hole while that particular feature was eliminated from the ½” and 3/8” drives at Type 10.  The ¼” drive will retain the oil hole feature through Type 13.

The Type 11 ratchets depicted below were not available for very long.  Based on what I’ve seen in terms of their availability, I’d say they are less common than several of the other Types from the 1980s and early 1990s.  The same goes for the Type 12 ratchets that I’ll feature next.  Here’s my benchmark.  After a little digging into some old family records, I was able to determine that during August, 1983, my dad bought me a set of Craftsman tools.  The set came with all three ratchet drive sizes (1/2”, 3/8”, ¼”).  Those ratchets, which I still have and use frequently, are what I have classified as Type 13 versions.  Although my Type 13 ratchets may have been produced and were probably available at Sears stores prior to August, 1983, it’s the earliest date I can point to in terms of knowing for sure that Type 13 ratchets were in circulation.  Also, without having taken an official count over the last three years, it’s still my impression that I see a lot more Type 13 ratchets in all three drive sizes, than I see of Type 11 and Type 12 ratchets.  Here are the Type 11 nomenclature lines:

Type 11:  March 1981 – 1982 (+/-), Small Letter Pat. Pending, TD, NonOH, LL, QR, FA, -V-, 44985
(represents ½” drive size)

Type 11:  March 1981 – 1982 (+/-), Small Letter Pat. Pending, TD, NonOH, LL, QR, FA, -V-, 43784
(represents 3/8” drive size)

Type 11:  March 1981 – 1982 (+/-), Small Letter Pat. Pending, TD, OH, LL, QR, FA, -V-, 43185
(represents ¼” drive size)

Notice that my ending date for all three drive sizes is “1982 (+/-)”  I qualified the ending date with (+/-) because I don’t really know for sure when the Type 11 ratchets came to an end.  Like I said earlier, the Type 11 and Type 12 examples are not as common as the Type 13 ratchets.  I can only say that the Type 11 and Type 12 ratchets had a combined lifespan that ran between March, 1981, and approximately August, 1983.  That’s a little over two years give or take.  It’s for those reasons that DadsTools supports combining the Type 11 and Type 12 ratchets into one Type with two “Patent Pending” variations.  While I have a lot of respect for his opinion, I decided to keep the Type 11 and Type 12 ratchets separate even though it forces me to be a little less precise when it comes to their respective timelines.  It goes back to the most basic goal of creating this Type Study….. I want anyone to be able to look at their ratchet, scroll though the Type pictures, find their ratchet and determine when the ratchet was manufactured/available.  When you look at the stamps on the handles of the Type 11 and Type 12 ratchets, even though they both display the same information, they look significantly different from each other.  I think they’d be easier to find if kept separate.

Jim C.
« Last Edit: July 27, 2020, 08:00:59 PM by Jim C. »
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Offline Jim C.

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #51 on: September 25, 2018, 12:38:10 PM »
Okay, here we are at Type 12.  As I noted in the Type 11 narrative, there aren’t any major changes between the Type 11 ratchets (with the microscopic printing on the handles) and the Type 12 version (with the larger, easier to read printing on the handles).  Since the printing and model numbers are bigger, I like to refer to the Type 12 ratchets as the “Large Letter Pat. Pending” version.  The model numbers on all three drive sizes remained the same, as seen on the previously featured Type 11 ratchets.  Also notice that the ¼” drive still retains the oil hole (OH) feature.  I don’t really like variations within Types mostly because I believe lumping multiple ratchets together with different handle stamps might make them harder to find.  When there’s an opportunity to separate them, I’ll do it.  Although I did eventually go into the details of the inner workings and mechanisms of some ratchets, the initial evaluation points were purely external and cosmetic in nature.  The handle stamps on the Type 11 and Type 12 ratchets differ enough to separate them.  As I also stated in the Type 11 narrative, a timeline can be assigned to the Type 11 and Type 12 ratchets but with a little less precision.  Even still, they’re probably not too far off the mark.  Here are the nomenclature lines:

Type 12: 1982 (+/-) – August 1983, Lrg. Letter Pat. Pend., TD, NonOH, LL, QR, FA, -V-, 44985
(represents ½” drive size)

Type 12: 1982 (+/-) – August 1983, Lrg. Letter Pat. Pend., TD, NonOH, LL, QR. FA, -V-, 43784
(represents 3/8” drive size)

Type 12: 1981 (+/-) – August 1983, Large Letter Pat. Pending, TD, OH, LL, QR, FA, -V-, 43185
(represents ¼” drive size)

Jim C.
« Last Edit: July 27, 2020, 07:50:54 AM by Jim C. »
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Offline p_toad

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #52 on: September 25, 2018, 03:56:23 PM »
"Okay, sorry for the delay"

No need to apologize.   Thank you for continuing this series.   :smiley:

I looked at that old Craftsman I had pictured before and it has the oil "hole" (really appears to be a spring loaded bearing in a hole?).    Also had a gander at an old Penens (?) i had sitting there.   Need to clean it up a bit and get pictures.

Offline Jim C.

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #53 on: September 26, 2018, 01:26:34 PM »
We have arrived at Type 13.  We’re almost to the end of this thing for a third time.  Everyone still with me?  Before I get into the particulars of the Type 13 ratchets, I want to say that the three ratchets depicted below are my everyday, go to, ratchets.  Back in the early 1980s, right around 1982 or 1983, I started getting interested in old cars.  I didn’t have any tools to speak of, and found myself borrowing them from my uncle, who was a hardcore “car guy.”   Anyway, my dad took up my interest and bought me a set of Craftsman tools.  The set came with the three ratchets shown below.  Since then, I’ve restored and/or tinkered with several old cars, and numerous old woodworking machines, not to mention having engaged in countless DIYer projects around the house using those three ratchets.  I find myself using the 3/8" drive the most.  They’ve held up beautifully, and at the same time, I’ve been careful with them too.  I use a breaker bar routinely and when I’m working over concrete, I spread quilted movers blankets on the floor.  I’ve dropped these ratchets more than once, but the thick blankets have protected them.  Several years ago I stripped the gear on my ½” drive applying too much torque on a carriage bolt nut.  It was a job for a breaker bar, but I was too lazy to walk back up to the garage to get one.  Lesson learned.

The Type 13 ratchets are very common, leading me to think they were offered for several years, starting at least as early as 1983 and running to about 1986, give or take.  Notice the ¼” drive still has that oil hole feature.  One minor detail that was added to all three drive sizes, starting with the Type 13 ratchets was that little “nub” at the twelve o’clock position on the directional lever.  I have no idea why that’s there, but all original Type 13 and Type 14 ratchets, in all three drive sizes, have it.  (See last photo below)  Originally equipped Type 12 and earlier versions did not have that nub.  Here are the nomenclature lines:

Type 13:  1983  – 1986, TD, NonOH, LL, QR, FA, -V-, 44985
(represents ½” drive size)

Type 13:  1983 – 1986, TD, NonOH, LL, QR, FA, -V-, 43784
(represents 3/8” drive size)

Type 13:  1983 – 1986, TD, OH, LL, QR, FA, -V-, 43185
(represents ¼” drive size)

Jim C.

« Last Edit: July 24, 2020, 08:54:53 PM by Jim C. »
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Offline p_toad

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #54 on: September 26, 2018, 04:11:11 PM »
super.   thank you.   that oil hole in the picture is exactly what mine looks like (i never really LOOKED at that before).   Is there a proper way to oil these?

Offline lptools

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #55 on: September 26, 2018, 04:20:31 PM »
Hello, Jim. Great job on the Type Study!!!! I can see why those are your "go to" ratchets. Regards, Lou
Member of PHARTS-  Perfect Handle Admiration, Restoration and Torturing Society

Offline Jim C.

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #56 on: September 26, 2018, 07:06:03 PM »
super.   thank you.   that oil hole in the picture is exactly what mine looks like (i never really LOOKED at that before).   Is there a proper way to oil these?

Hi Peter,

Those oil ports are spring loaded ball bearings, just like you said earlier.  I don’t personally think they’re very functional.  The trick is to push the ball bearing down with something, maybe a pick, and while it’s depressed, get a few drops of oil in there.  It’s tedious, and I think these Craftsman Teardrop ratchets function a lot better with a lubricant that’s a little thicker, like Super Lube.  That requires disassembly.  It would be difficult to get any sort of grease, or similar substance, into that hole/port.

Jim C.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2018, 07:18:56 PM by Jim C. »
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Offline p_toad

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #57 on: September 27, 2018, 10:41:45 PM »
"It would be difficult to get any sort of grease"

Hmmm...   might have to look at one of those little grease guns they make for chainsaw bars... 

Offline p_toad

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #58 on: September 28, 2018, 05:03:13 PM »
Ah, i know i can take it apart and get to the guts.  (putting things back together; well that's another ballgame).   :grin:

Offline p_toad

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #59 on: September 29, 2018, 06:51:39 PM »
Thank you for the kind offer.   I don't think i really need one to practice on  :tongue: so when i get back out there i can play with it some and get it cleaned up before i dunk it in lithium (no fibre axle grease for me   :grin:).