Author Topic: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study  (Read 26618 times)

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Offline Chillylulu

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #135 on: June 21, 2019, 09:44:40 PM »
Jim,

My first guess about the stamped pawls was that they were to differentiate the 32 vs 40 teeth when first made. After they went to a single tooth count they would stop needing the stamp.

But I changed my opinion as I read down. Why only 1 in 5 for 1/2" ratchets?  It makes sense if you consider how many Craftsman ratcgets needed rebuilding.  I wiukd guess that  most of those found were not used by pro mechanics.

Your guess seems the best explanation so far, IMHO.

Chilly

Online Jim C.

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #136 on: July 28, 2019, 01:31:20 PM »
Hey Chilly,

Sorry I missed this post from a month ago!  I promise I wasn’t blowing you off.  I just missed it..... Anyway, I really tried to come up with theories as to why some gears and pawls are stamped with tooth counts and others are not.  I considered a few but kept coming back to “repair kits.”  The trouble with being the sole evaluator is that there’s no “devil’s advocate.”  The repair kit theory seems like the best one to ME.  I could be right or I could be wrong.  It’s never bad to have another idea or theory come from an outside observer or two.  You could be right as well.  Unless we find a known repair kit from that time period, the real answer may always be just speculation.  Thanks for weighing in!

Jim C.
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Online Jim C.

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #137 on: September 29, 2019, 02:06:36 PM »
Back on page 9, reply 128, we got into a discussion about tooth counts pertaining to Type 1, 1/2" and 3/8" drive ratchets.  Recall that early versions of the Type 1, 1/2" drive, were outfitted with 40 tooth gears, while later versions of the Type 1, 1/2" drive, came with 32 tooth gears.  The Type 1, 3/8" drive ratchets were initially produced with a 32 tooth gear and then later with a 24 tooth gear.  Also recall back in reply 128 a discussion about tooth counts having been physically stamped on gears and pawls of various Type 1, 1/2" and 3/8" drive examples.  I floated the idea that those gears and pawls stamped with tooth counts could have possibly come from ratchet repair kits.  It's certainly trivial, and some of you might be thinking, "Who cares?" but I'd like to know the answer just the same.

As a result, I'm always on the lookout for Type 1, 1/2" and 3/8" drive ratchets.  I figure the more examples I see and dissect the greater my odds are of making some conclusive determinations.  The trouble is that Type 1 ratchets are somewhat scarce, and when they do show up, they're a little bit expensive.  So, I set a dollar limit and if I can get one for that amount or less, I'll buy it if possible.  As always, storage space is tight and how many Type 1 ratchets do I need?  Not to mention the monetary expense associated with acquiring them.  So, some I just have to pass on.  Anyway, I recently found another Type 1, 1/2" drive with a 40 tooth gear.  You might recall that I only had one back when I posted reply 128 and neither its pawl or gear had a "40" tooth count stamp.  My objective for buying the ratchet depicted below was to take it apart and check its gear and pawl for a "40" stamp.  Well, I got the ratchet, took it apart..... and found nothing.  No tooth count stamp on the pawl or gear.  A little disappointing for sure, but I'll keep looking for more examples.

Jim C.     
« Last Edit: October 07, 2019, 07:13:43 PM by Jim C. »
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Offline Downwindtracker2

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #138 on: December 10, 2019, 10:34:44 AM »
Great study, finding the differences is always interesting. Of course, I didn't find mine. I think it's a type 8. I would have bought it around that time frame. Here is the kicker, it doesn't have any patient dates, or even patient pending. I bought it at Simpson-Sears in Richmond,  B.C. Canada. It has just FORGED IN USA -V- 43785. rather lightly stamped I might add.

Online Jim C.

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #139 on: December 10, 2019, 12:12:38 PM »
Great study, finding the differences is always interesting. Of course, I didn't find mine. I think it's a type 8. I would have bought it around that time frame. Here is the kicker, it doesn't have any patient dates, or even patient pending. I bought it at Simpson-Sears in Richmond,  B.C. Canada. It has just FORGED IN USA -V- 43785. rather lightly stamped I might add.

Sounds like it could be a Type 9A or Type 10A depending on whether or not your ratchet has an oil port/hole or not.  Type 9A has the oil hole.  The Type 10A does not.

Jim C.
« Last Edit: December 10, 2019, 12:19:28 PM by Jim C. »
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Offline Downwindtracker2

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #140 on: December 10, 2019, 01:09:57 PM »
Thanks Jim. The stamp is what is what I found so odd, very light, the Craftsman face side has no lines , like your #8. It could be a Canadian export model ? I do have a fleamarket find #9A, it has lines and the shorter Craftsman. I also have another fleamarket find, a #12.

 I once had fun trying to date a American Stanley #4 hand plane, a 1949 . Because it was a transitional type, some of one, some of another, I was able to get a year fix. Canadian pre-war were much easier, they had the month and year stamped on them.


Online Jim C.

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #141 on: December 10, 2019, 05:22:21 PM »
Can you post a few pictures of the ratchet?  Let’s see what you’re talking about.

Jim C.
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Offline Downwindtracker2

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #142 on: December 10, 2019, 06:44:50 PM »
These is doubly embarrassing, one, while I have good skill set, computers aren't in it. Second, looking closely at #8 , I don't think it's #8, certainly not #9.  Your photo of the 3/8 #8 without the lines threw me. However,the Craftsman is 2.16" long compared to the 1.73" of what I think is a #9A. Which makes me think, they never intended to stamp the lines.  Both have oil holes and model #s . Trying to think back which car I worked on with it. In 1971 I bought a new SIMCA 1204, I'm pretty sure I worked on the preceding SIMCA 1000 with it, that car was a bit tool prone. My lack of driving skills didn't help. 

Online Jim C.

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #143 on: May 18, 2020, 06:24:00 AM »
While there’s not always a lot more to post in this thread, when I find something new, I’ll be sure to keep the information up to date.  Anyway, I recently picked up a set (1/2”, 3/8” and 1/4”) of Type 1 ratchets.  These ratchets aren’t overly common, but every once in a while I come across one for the right price.  Because the Type 1 had a few variations that were discussed earlier in the thread, I seem to gravitate to them and try to acquire them when possible.  After a few years, I now have several examples in all three sizes.  So, every time I get a ratchet, I take it apart, clean it, lubricate it and then reassemble it.  As for the three Type 1 ratchets I just got, the routine was the same.  I started with the 1/2”, then the 3/8” and last but not least, the 1/4”.  When I disassembled the 1/2” and 3/8” ratchets, I didn’t note anything unusual.  When I got to the 1/4” model I didn’t initially notice that its pawl was “bat wing” shaped.  It wasn’t until I started to reassemble it that I noticed that the pawl was not rounded on the bottom.  If you’ve ever taken apart a Type 1, then you know that those rounded bottom pawls are tricky in terms of getting them back into the head of the ratchet.  So as I was putting the bat wing pawl back into ratchet, it dawned on me that it went in without any trouble.  It was then that I noticed its shape was different.  It was a bat wing, which by its design is easier to re-install.

The bat wing pawl was used in Type 2 and later Craftsman teardrop ratchets.  To the best of my knowledge, the rounded pawls were only characteristic to the Type 1 ratchets.  Well, that’s not entirely true.  It appears that user friendly design changes were being made as early as the Type 1 ratchets.  After finding the bat wing pawl, I took a look at a few of my other Type 1, 1/4” drive ratchets.  To my surprise, I already had another one with the bat wing pawl that I hadn’t noticed when I previously took it apart.  If you look at the photo below, the ratchets on the ends have the bat wing pawls, while the two in the middle have the rounded pawls.  I think it’s safe to say that examples with the rounded pawls came earlier in the Type 1 production.  The other thing I noticed was that the tabs on the ends of the directional lever retention springs were significantly longer on the ratchets with the rounded pawls. (See the second photo.)  Those ratchets fitted with the bat wing pawls were much shorter.  I’d have to look at more examples, but that might be an external telltale in determining if the ratchet has the rounded or bat wing pawl prior to disassembling it.

Now you’re probably wondering if the same can be said of the 1/2” and 3/8” Type 1 ratchets.  Well, after checking more than a dozen 1/2” and 3/8” versions in total, I didn’t find a single bat wing pawl.  Maybe I need to look at more examples, or the bat wing pawl was only fitted to the 1/4” version.  For now, I don’t really know.

Jim C.

« Last Edit: May 25, 2020, 07:09:08 PM by Jim C. »
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Online Jim C.

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Re: Craftsman Teardrop Ratchet (1956-1993) Type Study
« Reply #144 on: May 26, 2020, 05:34:15 AM »
Following up on my last post regarding Type 1 tooth counts, pawls and retention ring spring tabs, I decided to take a look at the Type 1, 1/2” and 3/8” drive ratchets.  Recall from the last post that when the early rounded pawl was dropped in favor of the bat wing pawl, it seemed that the tabs on the directional lever retention spring got shorter. Not a big deal, but a possible telltale in determining if the ratchet is an early production (rounded pawl) or later production (bat wing pawl) version of the Type 1, 1/4” drive.  Also recall that none of the 1/2” drive or 3/8” drive Type 1 ratchets in my collection had the bat wing pawl.  That doesn’t mean they don’t exist, I just haven’t seen one.

Early production 1/2” drive ratchets had 40 teeth and what I noticed were extremely long socket post retention ring spring tabs.  If you take a look at the first photo below, notice the Type 1 early production 40 tooth ratchets are highlighted with blue and the later production 1/2” drive 32 tooth examples are highlighted with red.  Take a close look at the second and third photos. If you compare them, see how much longer the tabs are on the 40 tooth ratchets as compared to those on the 32 tooth versions?  The fourth photo compares the two side by side. See the difference? 

The fifth and sixth photos compare the 3/8” drive Type 1 ratchets.  The early production Type 1, 32 tooth ratchets are highlighted with green and the later production Type 1, 24 tooth ratchets are highlighted with yellow.  Once again, there’s a clear difference between the length of the tabs on the retention springs when comparing the early and later production examples.  It appears that once the Type 1, 1/2” and 3/8” tooth counts were reduced, the tabs on the retention springs were shortened.  I know, I’m picking fly sh*t out of pepper.  I guess I like the details.  For easy identification purposes however, I’d say that unaltered factory original Type 1 ratchets can be determined to be early production or later production based on the length of the retention ring spring tabs.  Having looked at nearly twenty Type 1 examples between all three drive sizes, there appears to a consistent pattern.  On the 1/4” drive, long tabs equal early production with a rounded pawl while short tabs equal later production with a bat wing pawl.  On the 1/2” and 3/8” drive ratchets, long tabs equal an early production 40 tooth gear and a 32 tooth gear respectively, while shorter tabs equal a later production 32 tooth gear and a 24 tooth gear respectively.  You’re probably wondering how you got by all this time without that amazing information.   :shocked:


Jim C.
« Last Edit: May 26, 2020, 12:03:48 PM by Jim C. »
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