Author Topic: Dunlap breast drill  (Read 138 times)

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Offline coolford

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Dunlap breast drill
« on: March 07, 2019, 02:23:57 PM »
Yes, I collect these also, this one was $5.00 in a thrift store and I semi restored it. One of the cheaper Sears tools.

Online Yadda

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Re: Dunlap breast drill
« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2019, 06:13:16 PM »
Nice work! I don't believe I miss those days when drilling a hole meant using a breast drill.
You might say I have a tool collecting problem....

Offline Nasutushenri

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Re: Dunlap breast drill
« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2019, 08:22:40 AM »
Yes, I collect these also, this one was $5.00 in a thrift store and I semi restored it. One of the cheaper Sears tools.

Coolford, nice drill. Glad to see there are collectors of those drills in the U.S.
I also collect these tools.
Can you show a picture of the reverse side of your drill: one or two pinions, single- or two-speed ?

Regards
Henri
Do not mind my bad English.
Member of PHARTS-  Perfect Handle Admiration, Restoration and Torturing Society

Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/100761653@N07/

Offline Bill Houghton

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Re: Dunlap breast drill
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2019, 10:06:12 AM »
Nice work! I don't believe I miss those days when drilling a hole meant using a breast drill.
Or, depending on material and hole size, a brace (with any number of possible attachments like a chain drill), an eggbeater drill, a push drill, a ratcheting drill in conjunction with braces against which it could work (termed, in the early 20th century, an "old man," with the implication that old men stood around a lot and might as well be useful), a joist or corner brace, a T-handle on an auger...what am I forgetting?

That's a nice clean one.  I've somehow acquired several - I think it's four - but never find them useful.  If I need a hole in the size that they're best for making, electrons come to my assistance.  Still, after the zombie apocalypse...

Offline mikeswrenches

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Re: Dunlap breast drill
« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2019, 06:23:16 AM »
I like these drills and their little brothers, hand drills. I like the fact that there are many different models and types. The 2-speed models are of particular intrest due to the many different designs that ultimately do the same job.

Many are quite rare and hard to find. A visit to Randy Roeder's web site below will give you some idea of the different models available from Millers Falls and Goodell-Pratt.

http://oldtoolheaven.com/index.html

There were also some excellent drills made by North Bros.(Yankee), and later Stanley, along with some smaller companies.

I do have a Dunlap hand drill but have never seen a breast drill.

Nice job on the rehab of your Dunlap!

Mike

Offline bonneyman

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Re: Dunlap breast drill
« Reply #5 on: March 09, 2019, 08:31:52 AM »
Still, after the zombie apocalypse...

That's a big 10-4!
Ratchet Guru

Offline coolford

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Re: Dunlap breast drill
« Reply #6 on: March 09, 2019, 01:23:59 PM »
This Dunlap is a two speed.  I have two Dunlap's now, I thought this one was the same as my other one, but it has a different number and the length is longer.  I have some of the less common ones, some in addition to two speeds have ratcheting.  I like the older Millers Falls best with detailed cast iron frames.

Offline Bill Houghton

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Re: Dunlap breast drill
« Reply #7 on: March 09, 2019, 02:06:34 PM »
My favorite eggbeaters, of any size, are the North Bros. Yankee drills, with their ratcheting features:
no ratcheting
ratchet forward
ratchet backward, and, the coolest of all,
double ratchet forward, so that, no matter in which direction you move the handle, the drill turns "forward," that is, to the right as required by most drill bits.  This last one is helpful in restricted spots and also gives you the ability to use your muscles most efficiently for maximum drilling power.

The North Bros. 1545 drill, about the size of the famed Millers Falls No. 2, beats the M-F out the gate and stays ahead all the way to the finish line, in my opinion.