Author Topic: Craftsman torque  (Read 578 times)

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Offline Dubdoc

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Craftsman torque
« on: May 22, 2020, 01:33:42 PM »
I've had this Craftsman torque wrench hanging on the wall for a loooooong time now. It's gotta go. Are they worth anything or does it go into the scrap bin?



Offline Northwoods

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Re: Craftsman torque
« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2020, 07:31:00 PM »
Take it with you when you next go to a swap meet.
The ORIGINAL Northwoods.

Online coolford

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Re: Craftsman torque
« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2020, 05:40:36 AM »
Most like that sell for $8.00 to $12.00.  Still a usable tool if you don't have any other torque wrench.

Offline Bill Houghton

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Re: Craftsman torque
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2020, 09:10:14 AM »
I'd be a touch amazed if you can get anything like $8 for it.  I see them at estate sales for anywhere from $1 to $5.

There was a time when beam-type torque wrenches were what you had unless you were a professional mechanic.  They're not expensive, and they're not hard to adjust to zero ("calibrate").  But other designs work better when you're torquing a fastener that's upside down in a constricted space or in other awkward situations, and, as the prices came down on those, people, including me, migrated to the better designs.  I think I still have one or two beam-type wrenches, including the first torque wrench I ever bought, back when we first started torquing the fasteners on the wooden cart wheels; but only for nostalgia.

Offline d42jeep

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Re: Craftsman torque
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2020, 11:10:46 PM »
Here are a couple that I’ve picked up. They were very reasonably priced.
-Don Houghton
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Offline Jim C.

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Re: Craftsman torque
« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2020, 05:27:32 AM »
Nice Don!  Those are in mint condition.  I’m pretty sure my dad had (has) one of those.

Jim C.
« Last Edit: May 24, 2020, 05:29:45 AM by Jim C. »
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Offline papadan

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Re: Craftsman torque
« Reply #6 on: May 24, 2020, 11:21:25 AM »
I still have the one my girlfriend bought me in 1974.
VWs to D10s, I've fixed em.
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Offline Bill Houghton

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Re: Craftsman torque
« Reply #7 on: May 24, 2020, 01:49:28 PM »
I still have the one my girlfriend bought me in 1974.
She obviously knew the old saying, "The way to the heart of a certain type of man is to buy him tools."

Do you still have the girlfriend?

Offline Downwindtracker2

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Re: Craftsman torque
« Reply #8 on: May 25, 2020, 10:00:56 PM »
The spring click ones can go out, causing all sorts of grief. A beam type doesn't so can be used to check them. I don't know what happened to my '70s Craftsman, but I pickup one just for that reason.

Offline Todd F.

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Re: Craftsman torque
« Reply #9 on: June 21, 2020, 07:55:00 AM »
Those Beam types are great for things like after you tighten down on the crush washer in a rear end and you want to check the running drag torque on the pinion. You can’t do that with a “click” type torque wrench.
Todd F.
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