Author Topic: wrenches  (Read 2956 times)

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Offline 1930

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wrenches
« on: May 30, 2011, 04:17:16 AM »
Can someone tell me what they know about the cutouts on these wrenches, when did manuf. start using the type on the right, I am assuming it was to grip the hardware better but I am assuming also that there was a specific time preiod when it was introduced.
Also just to clarify, I know Rusty has touched on this, I am under the impression that to make these wrenches the process started out with a flat sheet of steel and a big press just slammed down on it and cut it out like a cookie cutter would dough but lets say prior to the mid thirties or so did they have the capability to cut out a hundred with one punch or were they done individually?
Sorry about the hard to see pict, my eyes are not as old as some of you and I have a tough time seeing them. This is the largest I am allowed
« Last Edit: May 30, 2011, 04:24:31 AM by 1930 »
Always looking for what interests me, anything early Dodge Brothers/Graham Brothers trucks ( pre 1932 or so ) and slant six / Super six parts.

Offline 1930

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Re: wrenches
« Reply #1 on: May 30, 2011, 07:05:51 PM »
Pict. not clear enough????
Always looking for what interests me, anything early Dodge Brothers/Graham Brothers trucks ( pre 1932 or so ) and slant six / Super six parts.

Offline Papaw

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Re: wrenches
« Reply #2 on: May 30, 2011, 07:21:08 PM »
Nothing wrong with the pictures, just no answers.
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Offline rusty

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Re: wrenches
« Reply #3 on: May 30, 2011, 07:27:34 PM »
>prior to the mid thirties or so did they have the capability to cut out a hundred with one punch or were they done individually?

They had the capability, in 1900 Bethleham steel was running a 14,000 TON press driven by a 15,000 Horsepower triple cylinder steam engine. They were squashing entire Ingots right out of the furnace.

But they wouldn't have done it that way. To stamp something you need to suppore the underside of the die, it has to extend a fair way beyond the thing you are stamping out. trying top stamp out more than one thing at a time wasted enormous amounts of metal. so you just stamp one at a time really really fast. (think 200/minute)

Incidently, sheet metal for production comes in rolls, like paper. You can get it from a slitting mill in narrow widths, like, say, the length of a wrench..

As an aside, I'm in Rhode Island, we used to be the place where everyone's silverware was made. Spoons and forks  are made with the very same stamping machines...
(And I believe Mossberg was partly responsible for that fact, he was closely tied into the jewelry industry and textile industry in addidtion to making cheap wrenches)
« Last Edit: May 30, 2011, 07:29:15 PM by rusty »
Just a weathered light rust/WD40 mix patina.

Offline rusty

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Re: wrenches
« Reply #4 on: May 30, 2011, 08:02:03 PM »

This machine is about the right vintage, tho only a baby, too small to make wrenches...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jv8Uj2JO70I

(Video is somewhat annoying, but it's hard to find old machines)
Just a weathered light rust/WD40 mix patina.

Offline 1930

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Re: wrenches
« Reply #5 on: May 31, 2011, 06:19:44 AM »
Thanks Rusty, good man
Always looking for what interests me, anything early Dodge Brothers/Graham Brothers trucks ( pre 1932 or so ) and slant six / Super six parts.

Offline Wrenchmensch

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Re: wrenches
« Reply #6 on: May 31, 2011, 07:51:34 PM »
The phrase "cutout" is also often used to describe malleable cast iron wrenches which were molded with a cutout appearance.  Such cutouts delineated the manufacturers' names or the brand name. ABF (A. B. Farquhar Co.) and P & O (Parlin & Orendorff Co.) cutout wrenches advertised the manufacturer's name, Iron Age cutout wrenches advertised the Glenloch Company's brand name.

Alternate names for flat steel wrenches are"die cut" or "stamped".

Offline 1930

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Re: wrenches
« Reply #7 on: June 01, 2011, 02:54:11 PM »
Yes, I like those wrenches, dont know anything about them though enough to buy a bunch of planet jrs only to find out later they werent worth ( or barely were worth ) the money I had spent. Im gonna stick to what I know from now on, and that aint much. Keep it simple
Always looking for what interests me, anything early Dodge Brothers/Graham Brothers trucks ( pre 1932 or so ) and slant six / Super six parts.

Offline rusty

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Re: wrenches
« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2011, 02:56:26 PM »

I thought *everybody* owned a Planet Jr wrench, at least, there seem to be enough of them out there for everyone to own at least one....
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Offline 1930

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Re: wrenches
« Reply #9 on: June 01, 2011, 04:56:15 PM »
Try 3
Always looking for what interests me, anything early Dodge Brothers/Graham Brothers trucks ( pre 1932 or so ) and slant six / Super six parts.

Offline Wrenchmensch

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Re: wrenches
« Reply #10 on: June 04, 2011, 03:04:54 PM »
There are at least, in my experience so far, 5 commonly found Planet Jr. wrenches out there for us garden variety Middle Atlantic collectors (which I am). There is a small, medium, and large cutout, a medium and a large solid wrench.  Pictures of these rascals are shown below with a 12" ruler (for those who appreciate metrics).  Guys who started early, like the Schulz's and Marvin Wulwebber, or who published useful wrench books like Pete Rathbone's History of Old Time Farm Implement Companies and the Wrenches they issued including Buggy, Silo, Cream Separator, Windmill, and Gas Engine Companies, know of many more Planet Jr. wrenches. This fact is kind of discouraging to some of us, but then we must realize there are more wrenches out there than we can ever collect, and some of those are Planet Jrs.