Author Topic: Hand Planes  (Read 148265 times)

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Offline Jim C.

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1035 on: August 28, 2019, 06:21:05 PM »
Hey Lou,

I was referring to the standard #4 1/2.

Jim C.
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Offline Jim C.

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1036 on: August 29, 2019, 12:39:14 PM »
Just a little while back, we started talking about fiberboard planes.  At the time, I had zero experience with them as a hand plane collector other than the knowledge that they existed.  Prior to our conversation here in the thread, I hadn’t even picked one up.  Decades of collecting and using planes and I knew nothing about the Stanley #193.  With just a little searching around, I tracked down a pretty good early example with most of its parts.  I know what you’re thinking, “Jim’s always telling us to buy complete examples of planes, particularly when they include lots of parts.  Chasing parts is no fun and can be expensive.”  Okay, I broke the rule.  That being said, I had a little trouble determining what parts were included with the three versions of the plane, those being the #193, #193A and #193B.  When I bought the first plane (I ended up buying two) I was confident that all the parts were present and accounted for.  Well they were if I had purchased the #193 version of the plane (and still one cutter was missing).  Anyway, I eventually tracked down another version of the plane, the #193A, and pretty much collected all the parts necessary to present all three versions of the Stanley fiberboard plane. 

What I determined was that the #193 included everything necessary for using the six re-useable cutters.  The #193A included everything needed to use both re-useable cutters as well as the disposable razor blade cutters. And, it performed the most functions, to include cutting circles in fiberboard.  Finally, the #193B was a stripped down model that only used disposable razor blade cutters and did not include a fence assembly.  It was capable of making partial depth slit cuts, through-and-through cuts and “V” grooves (all with the assistance of a strait edge). The other thing to notice about the #193B is the fact that it included one re-useable blade and four disposable razor blade cutters.  That re-useable cutter is thinner gauge steel than the other five re-useable cutters included with the #193 and #193A.  It’s only as thick as the disposable razor blade cutters.  Just something to think about if you come across one of these planes and you’re thinking about it for your collection.

Although I searched through my “go to” reference materials and online sources, there doesn’t seem to be too much information about these planes.  What I did find was incomplete information and some conflicting information.  Using an earlier instruction manual I found online, and a later version that came with my #193A, I think I got everything figured out in terms of what parts came with what versions of the plane.  What I also learned was that older examples of the plane were outfitted with traditional rosewood knobs and totes and were attached to the main body casting with typical threaded rods and brass barrel nuts.  Later examples of the plane used stained hardwood knobs and totes that were attached to the main body casting with slotted head screws.  Take note of the last two photos below.  See how the light colored hardwood is visible on the bottoms of the one knob and tote set?  Other than that, none of the other parts differed in visual appearance and function between earlier and later examples.  All three versions of the #193 overlapped each other in terms of years in production.

Stanley #193:   1933 – 1943

Stanley #193A:   1936 – 1952

Stanley #193B:   1940 – 1958

So there you have it.  It’s probably a lot more than you’ll ever need to know about the Stanley #193 fiberboard plane.  And now that you’ve seen what versions of the plane included what parts, there’s no excuse for buying one that’s incomplete!!!  Do your homework. 

Jim C.   
« Last Edit: September 01, 2019, 04:37:17 AM by Jim C. »
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Offline coolford

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1037 on: August 29, 2019, 01:10:10 PM »
Jim-C----Thanks for the info on your 193A if I ever come across one I will at least know what I am looking at.

Now, I think its time to stir up this forum.  I was looking at a sorry cheap plane that was part of my 21 planes for $7.50.  Rusty, one with a pressed steel frog, no name on the iron and sides that were not finished and just cast and painted.  However, it was all there and the painted side gave me an idea.  So, here is what it looks like now.  I didn't paint the sole or the iron and after sharpening the iron I tried using it and found that it certainly didn't measure up to a #4 Stanley.  How do you like it???

Online Yadda

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1038 on: August 29, 2019, 02:07:50 PM »
Salute!
You might say I have a tool collecting problem....

Offline lptools

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1039 on: August 29, 2019, 02:24:01 PM »
Nicely done!!!!
Member of PHARTS-  Perfect Handle Admiration, Restoration and Torturing Society

Offline Bill Houghton

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1040 on: August 29, 2019, 03:38:11 PM »
Well...you didn't add much value...but you didn't take much away, either, since it has about zero value.  No, that's not true: you added some nice entertainment value.  And, if you move it along, someone will think it was originally painted that way!

Offline Jim C.

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1041 on: August 29, 2019, 03:55:14 PM »
It’s clearly time to close the loop on the Stanley #193 fiberboard plane.  Earlier I mentioned getting an operations manual.  It's in rough shape but it's still legible and does provide enough information to effectively and efficiently use the tool.  What I found interesting was the advertisement within the manual itself for some other tools to include the #194 fiberboard beveler and the #195 hardboard beveler.  Leave it to Stanley to make the most of an opportunity to sell more tools!  The plane also included an envelope that I suspect held the blades.  I've seen similar "parts envelopes" in boxes with other Stanley plane models with multiple little parts, cutters, etc.  (See page 71, reply 1054, for more on this little paper envelope.) Finally, the #193A I tracked down came in its original box.  While it's somewhat tattered, I guess it's better than no box at all.

Jim C.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2019, 11:37:49 AM by Jim C. »
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Offline p_toad

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1042 on: August 29, 2019, 06:06:20 PM »
Thanks for the extra info on the 193.   I had never seen one before that one came into the Restore.   Hope none of the extra stuff came in when i wasn't there...   :tongue:

Offline Jim C.

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1043 on: August 30, 2019, 06:18:02 PM »
Thanks Peter!  It was an educational series of posts for me as well.  I literally started from scratch with the #193.  Up until a week or so ago, I didn’t have one and I had no clue how to use one. In the end, my Stanley collection is another step closer to complete, and I learned a thing or two about an old tool, even though it’s mostly obsolete.  The #193 is a real contraption, but I must admit, it was kind of fun to use.  It sort of reminded me of using a plow plane, like a #50 for instance.  Now that I’ve tried it out, I only wish there was some reason to use it on a future project.  I just can’t imagine what that project would be.

Jim C.
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Offline Jimmy Joiner

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1044 on: August 30, 2019, 10:51:47 PM »
Great information Jim C! Very interesting I haven’t seen one here.
Jimmy

Offline Jim C.

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1045 on: August 31, 2019, 09:51:20 AM »
Great information Jim C! Very interesting I haven’t seen one here.
Jimmy

Thanks Jimmy,

The Stanley #193 turned out to be a fun plane to feature in the thread.  I’m glad you got something out of the posts.  I guess I’m not totally surprised that you haven’t run across one.  Since the plane is so specialized and was designed to cut a material that’s essentially no longer available and hasn’t been for decades, it’s mostly a forgotten tool.  Unlike many old planes from decades ago that are still applicable to woodworking today, the #193 had its time and that was it.  Couple that with all its parts, cutters, etc., the #193 is a tough one to find completely intact. The individual parts themselves look so strange and unique, trying to identify them without some background knowledge might be difficult.  Anyway, thanks for keeping up with the posts!  Stay tuned......

Jim C.
« Last Edit: August 31, 2019, 11:16:25 AM by Jim C. »
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Offline Jimmy Joiner

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1046 on: September 02, 2019, 02:18:31 AM »
My friends plane collection, he is mainly into Axes and also like farm machinery, looks like a couple of full hours of fun and beers at his house soon!

Jimmy

Offline Jim C.

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1047 on: September 02, 2019, 06:39:28 AM »
Wow, wow, wow!!!  What a collection! I studied that picture for a while and picked out several very nice planes.  A #62, #130, compass planes, routers, rabbets, and a full compliment of bench planes!  That’s an outstanding collection!  Thanks for the picture.  When you go visit your friend, take a few more pictures of his planes!  Looks like a heck of a “man cave” too.

Jim C.   
« Last Edit: September 02, 2019, 06:44:59 AM by Jim C. »
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Online Yadda

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1048 on: September 02, 2019, 07:35:45 AM »
Wow, wow, wow!!!  What a collection! I studied that picture for a while and picked out several very nice planes.  A #62, #130, compass planes, routers, rabbets, and a full compliment of bench planes!  That’s an outstanding collection!  Thanks for the picture.  When you go visit your friend, take a few more pictures of his planes!  Looks like a heck of a “man cave” too.

Jim C.

+1, more pics warranted.  I definitely want close up pics of the stuff he considers important in the wall case behind the table.
You might say I have a tool collecting problem....

Offline Jimmy Joiner

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1049 on: September 02, 2019, 01:40:32 PM »
Ha ha just you wait to see this blokes collections, if you think his plane collection is good, which in his words are “just a sideline for fun collection’. I can’t wait, I’ve been working on and off with him for five years now and have just found out regarding his man cave.

Jimmy