Author Topic: Hand Planes  (Read 133074 times)

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Offline Jim C.

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #900 on: February 16, 2019, 05:41:47 PM »
Hi coolford,

Thanks stopping by the thread!  You know, as soon as I saw that Shelton block plane, it almost immediately reminded me of the Stanley #118.  Go way back to page 13, reply #182, and let me know what you think.  Have you tried the plane? 

Jim C.
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Offline coolford

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #901 on: March 09, 2019, 02:22:26 PM »
Jim-C----Finally got around to making a comparison of the Shelton and Stanley 118.  The Stanley is i/8" shorter than the Shelton and the blade angle is slightly less.  The blade adjustments are different and the body (thickness) of the Stanley is greater.  The clamp of the Stanley is about 1/2" longer than the Shelton.  In the pictures the Shelton is always at the top.

Offline Jim C.

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #902 on: March 10, 2019, 03:27:24 PM »
Hi coolford,

Nice comparison between the two planes.  I’m not entirely sure, but I’d guess that the Shelton version is a knockoff of the Stanley #118.  What I did notice is that your Stanley #118 has a maroon colored finish.  That’s very likely original to the plane.  The maroon color came late in that plane’s production.  Probably during the late 1970s or early 1980s.

Jim C.
« Last Edit: March 10, 2019, 03:29:49 PM by Jim C. »
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Online Northwoods

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #903 on: March 10, 2019, 06:17:53 PM »
A very nice example of a Stanley No. 1 went for $750 today at this tool auction:

http://www.wischroppauctions.com/property_detail.asp?AuctionID=345
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Offline Jim C.

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #904 on: March 11, 2019, 05:29:58 AM »
Northwoods,

I’m not sure of the plane’s condition, but assuming it’s in what I would say is “collector quality” shape, prices are down from where they were several years ago.  Honestly, I’ve noticed that collectible planes, like the #1 for instance, across the board, aren’t selling for the same prices they used to sell for.  I can say that while I accumulated my collection for the love of collecting, without too much concern for its future value, my kids don’t necessarily have the same affinity for hand planes!  Someday, they may realize the monetary loss between what I paid for them and what they actually sell them for.  The very best examples seem to hold their value for the most part, but any planes below mint condition don’t seem to be as valuable as they were a decade or so ago.  Going forward, I’m aware of the changes in values and that hand planes are generally a bad investment.  That being said, I’m still a collector for the love of collecting without too much regard for what may or may not happen.

Jim C.
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Online Northwoods

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #905 on: March 11, 2019, 06:12:23 AM »
Northwoods,

I’m not sure of the plane’s condition, but assuming it’s in what I would say is “collector quality” shape, prices are down from where they were several years ago.  Honestly, I’ve noticed that collectible planes, like the #1 for instance, across the board, aren’t selling for the same prices they used to sell for.  I can say that while I accumulated my collection for the love of collecting, without too much concern for its future value, my kids don’t necessarily have the same affinity for hand planes!  Someday, they may realize the monetary loss between what I paid for them and what they actually sell them for.  The very best examples seem to hold their value for the most part, but any planes below mint condition don’t seem to be as valuable as they were a decade or so ago.  Going forward, I’m aware of the changes in values and that hand planes are generally a bad investment.  That being said, I’m still a collector for the love of collecting without too much regard for what may or may not happen.


I hear you.  For example, who is going to want to collect Hopalong Cassidy paraphernalia ten years from now?  As far as tools go, I am more likely to be drawn to first half 20th century ratchet/socket sets, but that No. 1 was really pretty.



Jim C.
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Offline lptools

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #906 on: March 11, 2019, 02:51:10 PM »
Hello, I had placed a bid over the phone for that No. 1, but did not win. Good thing I wasn't able to bid higher, or I would have kept going!!!Regards, Lou
Member of PHARTS-  Perfect Handle Admiration, Restoration and Torturing Society

Offline coolford

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #907 on: March 11, 2019, 04:31:16 PM »
Lets face it, this is not a hobby where you are going to sell out and make a mint.  I take the position that as long as I can afford to buy tools I will and not worry what the prices are going to be when I kick the bucket.  As I look over my collection, some are up and some are down, so what, I still like them all.

Offline Papaw

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #908 on: March 11, 2019, 04:52:23 PM »
Lets face it, this is not a hobby where you are going to sell out and make a mint.  I take the position that as long as I can afford to buy tools I will and not worry what the prices are going to be when I kick the bucket.  As I look over my collection, some are up and some are down, so what, I still like them all.


I am with you !
When I sell something, I just don't tell SWMBO how much I paid for it when I bought it !
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Offline Jim C.

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #909 on: March 15, 2019, 05:38:31 PM »
I'm with you guys as well.  Just keep collecting what you like!  Back a few posts (see reply #904 above), I said something about the value of tools and believing the very best examples tend to hold their value the most.  That's no revelation to anyone.  It only makes sense that a mint condition tool is worth more than one that's been neglected, abused, or simply well used over the years, and that mint condition tools will typically command a higher price as the years pass.  There may be exceptions for extremely scarce tools that are in lesser condition, but then one might be paying more for a tool's rarity.  Anyway, when I started collecting hand planes, I'll admit that I had some trouble distinguishing between a true "collector" quality plane and a nice "user."  The thrill of holding an old plane just got the better of me.   If you were to go back through the thread, you'd probably run across at least a couple of my collecting misadventures particularly as they relate to misjudging the condition of a plane and hence, its monetary value at the time of purchase.  Well, somewhere along the line, after "voluntarily" overpaying for less than top notch examples,  I wrote myself a set of condition guidelines that I've tried to live by.  I was very careful about it and tried to be objective.  When I buy a plane, or one comes my way for whatever reason, I try to fit its physical condition into a certain "framework."  Over the years, I've referred to this framework, and it has in a few instances, brought me back to reality.  I still get excited when I'm holding an old plane that might be unique, rare, etc.   It's easy to get carried away......and possibly overpay.  So once I get me feet back on the ground, I use some written guidelines to critically evaluate the plane's condition.

If you take a look at the photos below, you'll see an old, beat up 3" x 5" index card box.  In that box, I keep relatively detailed records of every plane in my collection.  Each plane has its own card.  I'll discuss that in my next post.  The first card in the box is my condition evaluation framework.  (see 3rd photo below)  I use that card to accurately grade every plane I own, and more importantly, those I'm thinking about adding to my collection.  After reading my condition guidelines, which I created from experience and observation, you may agree or disagree with it partially or in whole.  That's okay.  The point is that I use it as a personal check and balance in an attempt to keep my overall collection at a certain level and to objectively judge a plane's true condition and ultimately its current market value.  In my next post, I'll get a little more into the contents of index card box and its purpose.

Jim C.               
« Last Edit: March 16, 2019, 07:56:14 AM by Jim C. »
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Offline coolford

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #910 on: March 16, 2019, 12:51:46 PM »
Aluminum Stanley tote, now what do I do with it.  For some time I wanted such a tote because, I just wanted one.  Now that I picked up a Stanley No. 5 grooved bottom with a 1910 patent and an aluminum tote should I just leave it on that plane or what??  Stanley never sold a plane with an aluminum tote (according to the book) as it was only provided as a replacement.  This was one of three planes I bought at auction today.

Online Northwoods

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #911 on: March 16, 2019, 01:09:06 PM »
It's an honest replacement; it's part of the No. 5's history.  Keep it.
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Offline Yadda

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #912 on: March 16, 2019, 01:50:27 PM »
It's an honest replacement; it's part of the No. 5's history.  Keep it.

What he said.
You might say I have a tool collecting problem....

Offline coolford

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #913 on: March 16, 2019, 02:45:01 PM »
Okay, you have convinced me, but now I will have to clean up the plane, but then I only paid $10.00 for it.  And, I'm upholding my reputation, that I will buy anything, as I also bought a Shelton double end block plane.  This is similar to the Stanley 130 and also for $10.00 couldn't turn it down.  I have never seen another Shelton double end.

Offline Bill Houghton

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #914 on: March 16, 2019, 03:24:47 PM »
It's an honest replacement; it's part of the No. 5's history.  Keep it.
And you'll never have to glue it back together after you break it in a bout of heavy-duty planing.