Author Topic: Hand Planes  (Read 106995 times)

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Offline coolford

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #810 on: August 06, 2018, 01:03:56 PM »
Jim-C-----There were some paint remnants on the lever cap, but in the years since it was made someone else could have done that??  I wanted to restore it mainly for the example of the cast in frog.  Plus, I didn't have a No. 5 Worth.-----Coolford

Offline coolford

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #811 on: August 08, 2018, 02:37:47 PM »
Here are a couple of scraper planes, a Stanley No. 12 on the right and a Stanley No. 12 1/2 on the left.  The No. 12 was part of the 16 planes I bought at auction a few weeks ago.  Now the question, the 12 1/2 has a wood sole on the bottom, was that factory supplied or was that something a user added?  And, what was the purpose of the sole?

Offline lptools

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #812 on: August 08, 2018, 02:56:09 PM »
Hello, Coolford. The 12-1/2 is a Veneer Scraper, and was sold with a Rosewood Handle & Bottom. Manufactured from 1905 to 1943. ( from John Walter's Guide). I am guessing the Rosewood was there to keep the metal sole from damaging the veneer. Regards, Lou

Offline Jim C.

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #813 on: August 08, 2018, 06:56:20 PM »
Hello, Coolford. The 12-1/2 is a Veneer Scraper, and was sold with a Rosewood Handle & Bottom. Manufactured from 1905 to 1943. ( from John Walter's Guide). I am guessing the Rosewood was there to keep the metal sole from damaging the veneer. Regards, Lou

Hey Lou,

Couldn’t have said it better myself!  Great pair of scrapers coolford! 

Jim C.
« Last Edit: August 08, 2018, 07:02:28 PM by Jim C. »

Offline coolford

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #814 on: August 11, 2018, 01:48:43 PM »
Thanks to Bill Houghton I looked through my 900 pounds of planes and parts and came up with a Defiance by Stanley with the cast in frog which doesn't amount to much since it is only two verticals to hold the bottom of the blade and the adjuster and the yoke.  Here are a couple of pictures.

Offline Bill Houghton

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #815 on: August 11, 2018, 02:07:09 PM »
Someone, I think Patrick Leach, said they were called Defiance because the company defied you to do any good planing.  The two examples I have with that minimal bedding for the iron have extremely thin plane irons.  I wouldn't want to use them on much more than pine, and a softer variety at that.

Offline coolford

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #816 on: August 11, 2018, 03:13:05 PM »
I agree, both the blade and the curler are so thin I think heavy planning would warp them.

Offline p_toad

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #817 on: August 12, 2018, 06:29:14 PM »
Picked up a used 75 and a Bailey no. 5 with corrugated sole.   Lots of rust on the Bailey and a chunk out of the blade.   got most of the rust off; still have to re-glue the handle and check on getting a smaller brass brush to wisk away more of the rust that was hiding down inside.  will post pictures later after more cleanup and repair.   I don't consider rust "patina" any more than a broken in two handle to be a good thing.   Think this will clean up to a nice user.  :kiss:

Consider my brass wheel on the buffer (true brass, not one of those plated steel things) one of my best buys ever.  Gets rid of rust without tearing up the finish that's still on there.

Interestingly enough, the pieces parts look almost identical to your IMG 3538, including the studs to which the nuts were attached, etc.  All the same screws and washers.   not quite as pretty as that one from the box, but...   :tongue:
« Last Edit: August 12, 2018, 06:36:55 PM by p_toad »

Offline Jim C.

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #818 on: August 12, 2018, 07:41:58 PM »
Picked up a used 75 and a Bailey no. 5 with corrugated sole.   Lots of rust on the Bailey and a chunk out of the blade.   got most of the rust off; still have to re-glue the handle and check on getting a smaller brass brush to wisk away more of the rust that was hiding down inside.  will post pictures later after more cleanup and repair.   I don't consider rust "patina" any more than a broken in two handle to be a good thing.   Think this will clean up to a nice user.  :kiss:

Consider my brass wheel on the buffer (true brass, not one of those plated steel things) one of my best buys ever.  Gets rid of rust without tearing up the finish that's still on there.

Interestingly enough, the pieces parts look almost identical to your IMG 3538, including the studs to which the nuts were attached, etc.  All the same screws and washers.   not quite as pretty as that one from the box, but...   :tongue:

Hi Peter,

I’m looking forward to seeing your new planes.  That little #75 is a handy plane for cleaning up rabbet joints, particularly going with the grain.  You may recall that I mentioned having to replace a lot of window sash at my house. Well, I used a #75 frequently throughout the project.  It was the right plane for the job.  Simple, accurate and easy to use.

You already know how useful a #5 jack can be.  I’m anxious to see your restoration.  It’s gotta be a labor of love.  There’s a lot of #5 planes out there in the wild, and finding one that doesn’t need some elbow grease would probably be easier.  I think it’s great that you’re giving an old tool a new life.  Those often become the workers/users you’ll treasure the most.  Good call on choosing the brass brush.  I hate rust too.  I’ve had some pretty good luck removing it with Evapo-rust.  Careful repairing that tote.  You’ll only get one shot at it.  I usually practice clamping the two pieces prior to using glue, that way I can make sure everything lines up perfectly and I’m using the right clamp.  Once the glue is applied, the clock is ticking, the glue is drying (and filling the pores).  Practice makes perfect.  If you get it right, the crack will be almost invisible.  Once the glued parts have set overnight in the clamp, I remove the clamp and run one, or two holes if possible, up past the repaired joint.  Tap a dowel into the hole(s) with a little glue for added strength and that handle will hold up to normal use for a long time.  Good luck.  Post a few photos when you’re done!

Jim C.
« Last Edit: August 12, 2018, 08:06:07 PM by Jim C. »

Offline p_toad

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #819 on: August 13, 2018, 01:07:26 PM »
Thanks Jim.   I worked on it some yesterday but had to set it aside.   Break in handle is not pretty, but seems to fit together well and i may have to try that with the dowel(s).   There are two screws that hold the tote in place.

The 75 has a circular stamp on it from some maker, but it's faint/worn enough i can't really make it out.   Doesn't look like one of the two-line Stanley stamps.

Offline mikeswrenches

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #820 on: August 14, 2018, 08:58:15 AM »
Peter,
As others have pointed out, gluing totes can be a giant PITA. Quite a while ago I made a jig for doing this that takes a little of the pain away. If you have a band saw it’s quick and simple, doing it by hand not so much.
I won’t be home for awhile or I would post a picture. So I’ll see if I can describe it.

I used a scrap piece of oak but it really doesn’t matter what the wood is. The thickness should be about what the thickness of the tote is. Take an unbroken tote(as a patternj and put the bottom of it along the edge of the  block you’re using for your jig. Use a pencil to trace around the tote. Don’t try and get this exactly the size of your pattern. The only part that needs to be reasonably accurate is across the top.

Cut out the shape on your weapon of choice, and discard the piece you cut out. Try your pattern in the jig and see how it fits. The sides shouldn’t hit, but you should be able to push it up against the top of the jig.

You should now be able to put a clamp on the bottom of the tote and the top of the jig. Since you’re clamping at a 90 degree angle, you can put as much pressure as you want on the two or three broken tote pieces. You did use a block with the top and bottom sides parallel...didn’t you?

Obviously,with clearance around all sides of your broken tote, we need to close that up so the tote stays put when the clamp is applied. I cut several small wedges to put in the gaps between the jig and the broken tote pieces to hold everything in position. Don’t forget to put a piece of waxed paper under the glue joint. You don’t want it stuck to your bench.

This sounds more complicated than it really is. Getting the jig made takes the most time.

Another method is to stick a dowel in the hole to keep everything in alignment. This requires that you have a dowel of the exact size and that it is properly waxed..or else you’re going to learn how to drill a long hole at a very precise angle.
Good Luck,

Mike


Offline Bill Houghton

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #821 on: August 14, 2018, 09:07:37 AM »
I've found those plastic-bodied trigger clamps, the kind now sold by Irwin, good, especially those with soft jaw covers.  The body and jaw covers, together, flex enough to allow for the difference in angle between the top and bottom of the tote; and the jaw covers are grippy.

Offline p_toad

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #822 on: August 14, 2018, 09:17:49 AM »
Thanks for the tips on the repair.   I haven't tried anything with it yet and probably won't get to it today...  i'll post pictures at some future point.

Offline Jim C.

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #823 on: August 14, 2018, 10:22:42 AM »
FANTASTIC comments!!!!!  Mike, I’d love to see that jig.  I think enough of us have come across planes with broken totes, that having a jig like that would really come in handy.  If you get a chance, would you please post a few photos?  Thanks in advance.

Jim C.

Offline lptools

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #824 on: August 14, 2018, 12:56:00 PM »
Hello, Guys. I usually try to glue the totes back together , on the plane body. I use the nut and bolt as the clamp, and blue tape to keep everything in line. ( works better with the 5 & up sizes that have the screw on the bottom) .I like the idea of blocks to keep the sides parallel, I will try some Starboard blocks that I have, works great for glue pads, I have yet to have anything stick to the stuff. Of course this only works with clean breaks, for the really tough ones, I send them to my brother-in-law:-) Mike, I would also like to the the jig that you use. Regards, Lou