Author Topic: Hand Planes  (Read 152559 times)

0 Members and 4 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline gibsontool

  • Contributor
  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1279
Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1050 on: September 02, 2019, 04:33:35 PM »
I'd love to see more pics of his collection.

Offline Jimmy Joiner

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 57
Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1051 on: September 02, 2019, 10:39:10 PM »
That’s two of his six Axe cabinets,
Blacksmith Corner
And his colonial mock up hut, displaying his cross cuts and pit saws.
I’m impressed...

Jimmy




Offline Yadda

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1215
Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1052 on: September 03, 2019, 04:57:26 AM »
I agree, impressive!
You might say I have a tool collecting problem....

Offline gibsontool

  • Contributor
  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1279
Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1053 on: September 09, 2019, 12:15:13 PM »
Awesome pictures. Thanks Jimmy.

Offline Jim C.

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 870
Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1054 on: September 11, 2019, 11:25:58 AM »
On occasion, for whatever reason, I’ll go back through the thread and re-read old posts.  Sometimes I do that in preparation for a post I’m working on, plan to add in the future, or to correct mistakes.  Well, although I was done writing about the Stanley #193A fiberboard plane, I’m still fooling around with it out in my shop.  A few days ago I decided to try cutting a circle with it.  Don’t’ worry, I’m not going to demonstrate that procedure here, but in the process of setting up the plane, I realized that I had made some mistakes in the prior post on page 70, reply 1041.

At first I thought I’d just leave it alone, but it bugged me enough to feel the need to make some corrections to my prior statements, particularly in that reply.  I guess it’s just my OCD tendencies kicking into overdrive.  Anyway, in reply 1041, I mentioned having received a small paper envelope with one of the two planes I bought in an effort to make one complete example to present in the thread.  I mentioned that the envelope likely held small parts or cutters.  Looking back, that doesn’t make sense.  Sharp cutters in a paper envelope?  No way.  I will say, Stanley was pretty good about using the right packaging for their planes and associated parts/cutters and providing the appropriate hardware necessary to operate them.  After a little more research, I did find a photo online (at Handplane Central) that clearly depicts the #193 cutters in their own little box, and not a paper envelope.  (See the first photo below)  So what about that little (empty) envelope that came with one of my #193 planes?  I know it held small parts or HARDWARE!!!

So, let me go back to cutting a circle with the #193.  As I was reading the manual (see second photo), it clearly says, “Fasten the Circular Attachment to the Plane bottom by means of two screws which fit in the arm holes.”   ………  SCREWS!?  What screws?  The manual further instructs the user to make a wooden bar and attach it to the circular attachment with “wood screws.”  ……  MORE SCREWS  ……. that were also not included with either plane I bought!  After doing more research online, I came across one photo (on Jim Bode tools) of a Stanley #193 plane with screws and washers attached to its side for what I would guess were there to mount the circular attachment on the side plane, just like the instructions say to do.  See them on the side if the plane in the third photo?

In an effort to at least give you an idea of what was included in that little envelope, I tracked down some non-original hardware.  The screws that mount the circular attachment to the plane are ¼ - 28 x ½” with appropriately sized washers.  The wood screws that seem to best fit the countersunk holes on the circular attachment are #8 x 3/8”.  I'm guessing the screws and washers were originally in the envelope from the factory.  I would also venture to guess that all the screw heads were slotted and not Phillips, etc.  As a matter of fact, I don't think Stanley ever used anything but slotted head screws on any of their planes.  I'll bet you're all relieved to know that...... :embarrassed:

So there you have it.  I learned A LOT about the Stanley #193 during this series of posts.  Sorry to bore you with the minutia, but for my own sanity, I had to get the correct information into writing.  Thanks for hanging in there on this one.

Jim C.         
« Last Edit: September 11, 2019, 06:53:30 PM by Jim C. »
Our Go-To Type Study Member

Offline lptools

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1992
Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1055 on: September 11, 2019, 11:38:43 AM »
Hello, Jim. Thanks for sharing. Good job identifying the screw sizes, although not rare, not many suppliers stock a 1/4-28 x 1/2" slotted screw. Regards, Lou
Member of PHARTS-  Perfect Handle Admiration, Restoration and Torturing Society

Offline Jim C.

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 870
Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1056 on: September 11, 2019, 02:29:34 PM »
Hey Lou,

You’re right about that.  Those 1/4 - 28 x 1/2” slotted head screws were a little harder to find than I initially thought they would be.   I’ll admit that I wasn’t happy to find out that after buying two #193 planes, I was still missing a few Stanley factory original parts, even if the parts were just simple screws.  I think the original Stanley machine screws were flat on top of their heads (like bench plane frog screws) versus rounded like the replacements I found.  Like I said, I learned a lot on this one.

Jim C.
Our Go-To Type Study Member

Offline lptools

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1992
Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1057 on: September 11, 2019, 04:49:39 PM »
Hello, Jim. Could you send a photo of what the original screw heads look like? We have a pretty good supplier here, I will check to see if they have a slotted pan head, or, a slotted fillister ( did I spell that correctly? )  head screw. Regards, Lou
Member of PHARTS-  Perfect Handle Admiration, Restoration and Torturing Society

Offline Jim C.

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 870
Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1058 on: September 11, 2019, 06:30:52 PM »
Lou,

The Stanley original screw depicted below is EXACTLY what I think the screw should look like. 

Jim C.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2019, 06:33:09 PM by Jim C. »
Our Go-To Type Study Member

Offline lptools

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1992
Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1059 on: September 12, 2019, 03:59:55 AM »
Hello, Jim. Thanks for the photo, I will send you a PM. Regards, Lou
Member of PHARTS-  Perfect Handle Admiration, Restoration and Torturing Society

Offline p_toad

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 716
Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1060 on: September 12, 2019, 06:20:37 PM »
it's not a stanley, bailey, or anything else i ever heard of...
only got a couple of shots of it and they're not very good.
appears to be fairly well made.

Offline Jim C.

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 870
Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1061 on: September 13, 2019, 05:19:09 AM »
Hi Peter,

Very cool find!  I’m not familiar with Rugol planes. It’s particularly nice that you got the box with it.  I think it’s sometimes hard to come across lesser known brands in original packaging, so it’s a pretty unique.  Did you try it out?  How does it cut?

Jim C.
Our Go-To Type Study Member

Offline p_toad

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 716
Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1062 on: September 13, 2019, 05:27:31 PM »
No, i haven't tried it yet.   Still have some more cleaning of rust and dirt (actually not TOO bad).   Noted it has cast iron frog and seems to be fairly well fitted (except the loose tote).   Screws are all in good shape and i'll try to get more pictures.   yes, pictures before i bought it...didn't want to have it go to a bad home and lucky the guy there found the box it came in (most boxes seem to get pitched   :tongue: ).

Offline Jimmy Joiner

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 57
Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1063 on: September 14, 2019, 02:47:47 PM »
Nice find Peter! Looks well made like Jim said. When would you date it? Between the wars?
Jimmy

Offline Jim C.

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 870
Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1064 on: September 21, 2019, 04:22:42 PM »
A little while back, I finally found myself in a position to do a lot more woodworking.  I had a few projects on hold from some time back.  I’d get them started with good intentions but get sidetracked for a multitude of reasons I’m sure we can all relate to in one way or another.  I’d spend an hour or two here and there working on a project and then not touch it for a couple weeks, or months…….. or years. Somewhere in there, I had to replace most of the window sash in my house so the machines became dedicated to that project.  Along the way, the shop got over cluttered with stuff and going out there wasn’t fun anymore.  It was kind of a shame, because it’s a nice little space that was originally designed to accommodate a small woodworking hobby.  Well, the window project came to an end, I have time now, and I got motivated to get my shop back in order.  Time to start enjoying woodworking again. 

Many, many years ago, I made an island and stools for my kitchen.  It was one of my first big woodworking projects that I started and finished in my shop.  If you need a refresher, go back to page 8, reply 116.  Recall that the island top and stool seats were made from walnut that I sourced from a single tree in Michigan.  From that same tree came a large branch that had a curve to it.  When the tree was being cut up, I asked for a section of that branch, right where the curve started heading upward.  It’s basically a slab of walnut that I’ve been hanging onto for at least twenty years or so.  I always saw it as a foyer bench or possibly a plant stand situated in a floor to ceiling bay window.  With some ideas and design help from my wife, it looks like the slab will be incorporated into a coffee table in the living room.  While that will be its primary function, it will also have the versatility to convert into the foyer bench or bay window plant stand if desired.

So how does this relate to hand planes?  Well, the whole project involves hand planes.  If you recall, back on page 67, reply 1001, we discussed using a bench hook to fit tenons with a rabbet throated block plane.  Remember?  The stretcher used in the bench hook demonstration was a part of this same coffee table project and will connect one set of legs.  Another identical stretcher will connect another set of legs.  But how to connect the two sets of legs to each other?  Well, the simple answer is a center stretcher that will run the length of the table…… but remember, the walnut slab has a curve to it.  That adds a dimension of interest to the finished piece and some extra complexity to the construction process.  I ended up laminating four strips of wood together in a plywood press that mimicked the curve of the branch.  (You can see the plywood press in the background.) While that doesn’t deal specifically with hand planes, detailing that stretcher, that is, easing the sharp edges does!  Any time I can reasonably use a plane to do a job, I’ll use the plane.  In this instance, I wanted to lightly break the edges of the three stretchers with a block plane.  The short straight stretchers were simple with to do with any (preferably low angle) block plane.  I went with my “go to” Lie-Nielsen #60 ½.

Tackling the curved stretcher presented a different challenge.  On the convex side, the L-N #60 ½ was up to the task by simply canting the plane’s sole as I pushed it along to follow the curve while keeping the cutting iron in contact with the work piece.  On the first try, I occasionally lost contact between the plane’s cutter and the wood.  I’d pick up where I lost contact and finish the cut.  By the fourth and final pass, I made good cutting contact from start to finish and ended up with a nice finished surface free of a sharp edge.  Unfortunately, the concave arc was a bit too curved to allow me to use a flat-bottomed block plane like the L-N #60 ½.  What I needed was a plane with a shorter sole that was also curved.  Okay, is anyone thinking about the Stanley #100 ½ for this job?  It was the perfect answer.  (For more on the Stanley #100 ½ please refer back to page 19, reply 270.)  By also canting the sole of the plane as I pushed it along the concave arc, I was able to slice off “dental floss” like shavings for a subtle break on the edge, again leaving it smooth to the touch.

Now, you might be thinking that I could have eased the edges of the stretchers with some fine grit sandpaper.  Well, I could have and it might have been less involved and faster too.  But I think sandpaper tends to dull the surface of wood, while a sharp plane iron leaves a crisp, bright finish.  Sandpaper definitely has its place out in the shop, but any time I can reasonably use a hand plane………  you know what I’m saying.

Jim C.                   
« Last Edit: September 21, 2019, 04:59:41 PM by Jim C. »
Our Go-To Type Study Member