Author Topic: Hand Planes  (Read 143963 times)

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Offline gibsontool

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1050 on: September 02, 2019, 04:33:35 PM »
I'd love to see more pics of his collection.

Offline Jimmy Joiner

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1051 on: September 02, 2019, 10:39:10 PM »
That’s two of his six Axe cabinets,
Blacksmith Corner
And his colonial mock up hut, displaying his cross cuts and pit saws.
I’m impressed...

Jimmy




Offline Yadda

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1052 on: September 03, 2019, 04:57:26 AM »
I agree, impressive!
You might say I have a tool collecting problem....

Offline gibsontool

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1053 on: September 09, 2019, 12:15:13 PM »
Awesome pictures. Thanks Jimmy.

Offline Jim C.

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1054 on: September 11, 2019, 11:25:58 AM »
On occasion, for whatever reason, I’ll go back through the thread and re-read old posts.  Sometimes I do that in preparation for a post I’m working on, plan to add in the future, or to correct mistakes.  Well, although I was done writing about the Stanley #193A fiberboard plane, I’m still fooling around with it out in my shop.  A few days ago I decided to try cutting a circle with it.  Don’t’ worry, I’m not going to demonstrate that procedure here, but in the process of setting up the plane, I realized that I had made some mistakes in the prior post on page 70, reply 1041.

At first I thought I’d just leave it alone, but it bugged me enough to feel the need to make some corrections to my prior statements, particularly in that reply.  I guess it’s just my OCD tendencies kicking into overdrive.  Anyway, in reply 1041, I mentioned having received a small paper envelope with one of the two planes I bought in an effort to make one complete example to present in the thread.  I mentioned that the envelope likely held small parts or cutters.  Looking back, that doesn’t make sense.  Sharp cutters in a paper envelope?  No way.  I will say, Stanley was pretty good about using the right packaging for their planes and associated parts/cutters and providing the appropriate hardware necessary to operate them.  After a little more research, I did find a photo online (at Handplane Central) that clearly depicts the #193 cutters in their own little box, and not a paper envelope.  (See the first photo below)  So what about that little (empty) envelope that came with one of my #193 planes?  I know it held small parts or HARDWARE!!!

So, let me go back to cutting a circle with the #193.  As I was reading the manual (see second photo), it clearly says, “Fasten the Circular Attachment to the Plane bottom by means of two screws which fit in the arm holes.”   ………  SCREWS!?  What screws?  The manual further instructs the user to make a wooden bar and attach it to the circular attachment with “wood screws.”  ……  MORE SCREWS  ……. that were also not included with either plane I bought!  After doing more research online, I came across one photo (on Jim Bode tools) of a Stanley #193 plane with screws and washers attached to its side for what I would guess were there to mount the circular attachment on the side plane, just like the instructions say to do.  See them on the side if the plane in the third photo?

In an effort to at least give you an idea of what was included in that little envelope, I tracked down some non-original hardware.  The screws that mount the circular attachment to the plane are ¼ - 28 x ½” with appropriately sized washers.  The wood screws that seem to best fit the countersunk holes on the circular attachment are #8 x 3/8”.  I'm guessing the screws and washers were originally in the envelope from the factory.  I would also venture to guess that all the screw heads were slotted and not Phillips, etc.  As a matter of fact, I don't think Stanley ever used anything but slotted head screws on any of their planes.  I'll bet you're all relieved to know that...... :embarrassed:

So there you have it.  I learned A LOT about the Stanley #193 during this series of posts.  Sorry to bore you with the minutia, but for my own sanity, I had to get the correct information into writing.  Thanks for hanging in there on this one.

Jim C.         
« Last Edit: September 11, 2019, 06:53:30 PM by Jim C. »
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Offline lptools

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1055 on: September 11, 2019, 11:38:43 AM »
Hello, Jim. Thanks for sharing. Good job identifying the screw sizes, although not rare, not many suppliers stock a 1/4-28 x 1/2" slotted screw. Regards, Lou
Member of PHARTS-  Perfect Handle Admiration, Restoration and Torturing Society

Offline Jim C.

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1056 on: September 11, 2019, 02:29:34 PM »
Hey Lou,

You’re right about that.  Those 1/4 - 28 x 1/2” slotted head screws were a little harder to find than I initially thought they would be.   I’ll admit that I wasn’t happy to find out that after buying two #193 planes, I was still missing a few Stanley factory original parts, even if the parts were just simple screws.  I think the original Stanley machine screws were flat on top of their heads (like bench plane frog screws) versus rounded like the replacements I found.  Like I said, I learned a lot on this one.

Jim C.
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Offline lptools

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1057 on: September 11, 2019, 04:49:39 PM »
Hello, Jim. Could you send a photo of what the original screw heads look like? We have a pretty good supplier here, I will check to see if they have a slotted pan head, or, a slotted fillister ( did I spell that correctly? )  head screw. Regards, Lou
Member of PHARTS-  Perfect Handle Admiration, Restoration and Torturing Society

Offline Jim C.

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1058 on: September 11, 2019, 06:30:52 PM »
Lou,

The Stanley original screw depicted below is EXACTLY what I think the screw should look like. 

Jim C.
« Last Edit: September 11, 2019, 06:33:09 PM by Jim C. »
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Offline lptools

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1059 on: September 12, 2019, 03:59:55 AM »
Hello, Jim. Thanks for the photo, I will send you a PM. Regards, Lou
Member of PHARTS-  Perfect Handle Admiration, Restoration and Torturing Society

Offline p_toad

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1060 on: September 12, 2019, 06:20:37 PM »
it's not a stanley, bailey, or anything else i ever heard of...
only got a couple of shots of it and they're not very good.
appears to be fairly well made.

Offline Jim C.

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1061 on: September 13, 2019, 05:19:09 AM »
Hi Peter,

Very cool find!  I’m not familiar with Rugol planes. It’s particularly nice that you got the box with it.  I think it’s sometimes hard to come across lesser known brands in original packaging, so it’s a pretty unique.  Did you try it out?  How does it cut?

Jim C.
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Offline p_toad

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1062 on: September 13, 2019, 05:27:31 PM »
No, i haven't tried it yet.   Still have some more cleaning of rust and dirt (actually not TOO bad).   Noted it has cast iron frog and seems to be fairly well fitted (except the loose tote).   Screws are all in good shape and i'll try to get more pictures.   yes, pictures before i bought it...didn't want to have it go to a bad home and lucky the guy there found the box it came in (most boxes seem to get pitched   :tongue: ).

Offline Jimmy Joiner

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #1063 on: September 14, 2019, 02:47:47 PM »
Nice find Peter! Looks well made like Jim said. When would you date it? Between the wars?
Jimmy